Les Liaisons Dangereuses Scribe Christopher Hampton Shares His Inspiration, Favorite Lines & More

first_img Christopher Hampton is an award-winning writer, screenwriter, director and producer. He is perhaps most famous for his play Les Liaisons Dangereuses (based on the novel by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos), which won an Olivier Award in 1986. He adapted the play for film and won an Oscar for the screenplay. In addition to Les Liaisons Dangereuses, his many plays include The Talking Cure, White Chameleon, Tales from Hollywood, Treats, Savages and Total Eclipse. Hampton won two Tony Awards for the book and score (he co-wrote the lyrics with Don Black) for Sunset Boulevard, winning Tony Awards in both categories. He has translated a wide range of works including classics by Chekhov, Ibsen and Moliere as well as contemporary plays by Yasmina Reza (Art, God of Carnage) and Florian Zeller (The Father). His long list of screenplays includes The Quiet American, Mary Reilly, Carrington, The Secret Agent and Atonement. As the newest Broadway revival of Les Liaisons Dangereuses readies for its opening night, Hampton took a break from rehearsals to welcome Broadway.com to his hotel, where he chatted about being prolific and his writing process.What time of day do you get your best work done?I usually work in the afternoons, which I think is unusual. I spend the morning looking at yesterday’s work and correcting it and dealing with whatever I have to deal with. Then I generally settle down to write between two and three in the afternoon. I write for four or five hours. Where do you like to write?I can write anywhere. I used to for many years write a lot of my work in hotel rooms, which I found congenial to the process of isolation which you need. But I have various [places]: I have an office with a room where I write; I have a room at home where I can write, and I have a place in the country, which is at the moment proving the most efficient place of all to write. What piece of writing changed your life?What obsesses you as a writer?I don’t know if there is any one thing that you find obsessional as a writer. You need to be obsessional, but I’m generally just obsessional about the particular piece of work that I’m doing at the moment. Maybe that’s significant because one of the things I’ve tried to do all my writing life is to choose a very wide variety of subjects, so I’m not really going down a groove or writing or perfecting the same themes over and over again. I’m looking for something completely different every time I start again. Each time you have to become involved in a different world in a different universe of those characters, so that’s what you get obsessed with. You’ve written such a wide array of mediums and genres, what do you find most gratifying of theater in particular?I think what I love about the theater is that it’s new every night. With movies— when it’s done, it’s an object. Like a book, there’s nothing you can do to it. Whereas plays relate to their time in different ways every time that it’s done. Different actors and discover different facets of the piece. So, it’s always really exciting to go back into the theater with an old play because this lot of actors and this director are going to find something new in it—something that relates to the world that’s now rather than 30 years ago when I wrote the play.Going back in time, what made you decide that Les Liaisons Dangereuses would be something you would adapt for the stage?I loved the book [by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos] when I first read it. I used to reread it; I thought it was just tremendously psychologically acute and informative about sex as well as the society in which those people lived. It’s difficult to write a play from this book because the two characters never meet: they write letters to one another, so I had to really reconfigure the book and reimagine it before I could write it. The difficulty of that process discouraged a lot of theaters. In the end, I wrote the play for the Royal Shakespeare Company because they gave me a blind commission and said I could write what I liked.Which writers have inspired you?What’s the secret to being so prolific? Sitting down every day and writing is the secret to being prolific. There isn’t a secret. Actually, my work rate has increased exponentially as I’ve gotten older. When I started in my twenties, I would write a play and then spend a lot of time thinking about what the next play was going to be and then write that. I would produce a play every couple of years. Now I regularly take on three or four things at once. I find each thing that you’re doing either refreshes or contrasts with whatever else you’re doing. I don’t work on two things at once in the same day, but I can work on something for a day or two and work on something else for a day or two. I find that a very invigorating process. What’s something aspiring playwrights should know, do or see?What I think playwrights should know before they go into the theater is they have to be flexible. You cannot have too rigid an idea how your play is going to be. Good actors will bring to the piece elements that you didn’t even imagine yourself and deepen the whole thing in that way. If you’re too defensive during the rehearsal process, which is a process of experimentation, or if you’re too fixated on what you originally thought, you will lose one of the great treasures of the theater, which is collaborative discovery. I think often young writers have such a vivid idea of what it is they want on the stage, they’re not very open to the interaction of others. On the other hand, in my view, there’s much too much workshopping of plays and bullying of playwrights to follow various templates of success, and that should be resisted.So stick to your vision but don’t insist on the detail until you’ve seen what the actors and directors can do with it. What’s your favorite line in Les Liaisons Dangereuses? Les Liaisons Dangereuses View Comments Related Showscenter_img Christopher Hampton (Photo: Caitlin McNaney) Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 8, 2017last_img read more

Authorities search for identity of man accused of rape

first_imgAuthorities are asking for the public’s help in identifying a suspect who is accused of raping a woman in Hollywood, Florida.The incident occurred Sunday around 9:00 am along the 5800 block of Hollywood Boulevard.According to the report, the suspect reportedly threatened the woman and forced her into a damaged newer-model, silver Nissan Sentra sedan, while they were in front of a convenience store.The suspect then drove the woman to another location where he sexually battered her.Authorities have released surveillance video of the man walking around and then leaving the convenience store’s parking lot in his car.He is described as a Hispanic male between 30 and 35 years old, standing approximately 5 feet 10 inches, weighing 200 pounds with black hair. He is also said to have tattoos on his chest.He was last seen wearing a dark green shirt with a lizard on the front of it.His vehicle is described as having damage to its front and rear passenger-side doors. The vehicle is also missing its right-rear hubcap.If you have any information about this incident you are asked to call Broward County Crime Stoppers at 954-493-TIPS. Remember, you can always remain anonymous, and you may be eligible for a $3,000 reward.last_img read more

Seager brothers each hit home run but Dodgers win matchup with Mariners

first_img“He only got three (hits). That’s his fault,” Corey Seager said. “We still got the win so I’ll take that for sure.”Both Seager brothers hit home runs in the game, becoming the 10th pair of brothers to hit home runs for different teams in the same game, the first since Felipe and Cesar Crespo in 2001.“For sure, it was a lot of fun. It was a special moment,” Corey Seager said after both he and Kyle were caught on camera suppressing grins as the other brother passed them rounding the bases. “It was one of those things where you can go home and think about it, soak it all in. You try to be in the moment as much as possible. You’re still trying to win a game. But when you get around him, it was hard to not see your brother in your opponent. It was a lot of fun for sure.”Corey Seager’s homer was a three-run shot, the biggest hit in a five-run second inning that put the Dodgers up 6-2 against the sagging Mariners.But every time Ross Stripling gets into the Dodgers’ starting rotation, he turns into the babysitter in an 1980s era horror movie. He hears steps. And they’re coming from inside the house. LOS ANGELES — Little brother always gets his way.Before playing against his older brother, Seattle Mariners third baseman Kyle Seager, in a regular-season game for the first time Monday, Dodgers shortstop Corey Seager said he would be rooting for big brother to get four hits — “and we still win.”Kyle was on base four times, on three hits and a walk. And the Dodgers did win, though it took a five-run seventh-inning comeback to fulfill the younger Seager’s wish with an 11-9 victory over the Mariners.PreviousThe Dodgers’ Joc Pederson #31 catches a fly ball for an out during their game against the Mariners at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Dodgers’ Enrique Hernandez #14 is congratulated by A.J. Pollock #11 after he hit a two run homer in the bottom of the seventh inning during their game against the Mariners at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Mariners’ J.P. Crawford #3 throws to first base for a double play as the Dodgers’ Max Muncy #13 slides into second base in the bottom of the seventh inning during their game at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsThe Dodgers’ Mookie Betts rounds the bases after hitting a homer in the bottom of the first inning during their game against the Mariners at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Dodgers’ Enrique Hernandez #14 is congratulated after he hit a two run homer in the bottom of the seventh inning during their game against the Mariners at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Mariners’ Kyle Seager #15 steals second base as the Dodgers’ Enrique Hernandez #14 goes up for the throw in the top of the seventh inning during their game at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Dodgers’ Joc Pederson #31 slides into home as Mariners catcher Austin Nola #23 prepares tags him for the out in the bottom of the second inning during their game at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Dodger right fielder Joc Pederson #31 makes a leaping catch for the out on a fly ball hit by the Mariners’ Shed Long #4 in the top of the fifth inning during their game at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Dodger pitcher Caleb Ferguson #64 during their game against the Mariners at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Dodgers’ Joc Pederson #31 reacts after Mariners catcher Austin Nola #23 tagged him out at home in the bottom of the second inning during their game at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Mariners’ Shed Long #4 goes after a Dodgers’ Justin Turner #10 foul ball during their game at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Dodgers’ Corey Seager #5 slugs a three run homer in the bottom of the second inning during their game against the Mariners at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Dodgers’ Corey Seager #5 celebrates after hitting a three run homer in the bottom of the second inning during their game against the Mariners at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Dodgers’ Joc Pederson #31 slides into home as Mariners catcher Austin Nola #23 prepares to make the tag for the out in the bottom of the second inning during their game at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Dodgers’ Mookie Betts enters the dugout after hitting a homer in the bottom of the first inning during their game against the Mariners at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Dodgers’ Cody Bellinger #35 catches a fly ball for the out during their game against the Mariners at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Dodger starting pitcher Ross Stripling #68 during their game against the Mariners at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Dodgers’ Justin Turner #10 catches a ground ball and tags second base for the out during their game against the Mariners at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Dodgers’ Max Muncy #13 makes a diving attempt at a ground ball hit by the Mariners’ Kyle Lewis #1 during their game at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Mariners starting pitcher Justin Dunn #35 during their game against the Dodgers at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling #68 looks away after giving up a home run to the Mariners Kyle Seager #15 in the top of the third inning during their game at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Dodger pitcher Ross Stripling #68 reacts after giving up a two run homer to Kyle Lewis #1 in the top of the third inning during their game at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Dodgers’ Mookie Betts rounds the bases after hitting a homer in the bottom of the first inning during their game against the Mariners at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Dodger starting pitcher Ross Stripling #68 during their game against the Mariners at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Dodgers’ Joc Pederson #31 catches a fly ball for an out during their game against the Mariners at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Dodgers’ Enrique Hernandez #14 is congratulated by A.J. Pollock #11 after he hit a two run homer in the bottom of the seventh inning during their game against the Mariners at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)NextShow Caption1 of 24The Dodgers’ Enrique Hernandez #14 is congratulated by A.J. Pollock #11 after he hit a two run homer in the bottom of the seventh inning during their game against the Mariners at Dodger Stadium, Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)ExpandThe win extended the Dodgers’ streak to six consecutive (and the Mariners’ losing streak to the same). Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season Tabbed to replace David Price in the season-opening rotation, Stripling’s always-tenuous hold on a rotation spot has slipped in each of his past four starts. Monday was the worst of the bunch. He faced 17 batters in three innings, retired just nine of them and gave up eight hits including three home runs in a five-run third inning to surrender the Dodgers’ early lead.“These guys are good fastball hitters so I felt I was going to get them out with offspeed through the night,” Stripling said. “But the fastballs that I threw were too much of a strike there. When I know I’m going to get them out with offspeed or at least try to get them out with offspeed, to give them fastballs to hit and do damage there is not the right call.“Really, I felt like I threw the ball well. It’s just that the mistakes I made, they hammered them.”In his first start of the season, Stripling was terrific, flashing a new changeup grip and allowing just one run on four hits in seven innings against the San Francisco Giants.In four starts since then, however, he has allowed 20 runs (15 earned) on 24 hits, eight walks and a hit batter in 18 2/3 innings — a 7.23 ERA and 1.77 WHIP.“Really at the end of the day, I feel like I’m throwing the ball well,” he said. “My velocity is up. If you are into analytics and all that stuff, my numbers are up. I’m throwing the ball maybe as good as I ever have. But the results aren’t necessarily on the mound. So it’s like how do we get those to transfer over to zeroes on the scoreboard?”The Dodgers’ overstuffed starting rotation currently goes six deep with Tony Gonsolin sticking around for another turn Tuesday and Dustin May running to the front of the pack for this year’s National League Rookie of the Year award.An off day Monday, Aug. 24 could bring changes. Alex Wood is also working back from a shoulder injury and could be ready to reclaim a spot in the rotation in another week or so.“Certainly performance matters,” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said, unwilling to be drawn into a discussion of Stripling’s future in the rotation. “You still trust Ross — the work, the preparation, the ability with his pitch mix to continue to make pitches. It’s been a little bit of a rough few starts. But Ross is going to find his way out of it.”The Dodgers were down 8-6 when Corey Seager led off the seventh inning with the family’s fifth hit of the night, a rocket off the glove of shortstop J.P. Crawford for a single. Another single and a walk loaded the bases for A.J. Pollock.Pollock stroked an RBI single into left field and Max Muncy forced in the tying run with a bases-loaded walk. The go-ahead run scored on a double play then Kiké Hernandez cleared the bases with a two-run home run.The five-run seventh gave the Dodgers 45 runs in the seventh inning or later this season to 12 for their opponents.“We’re relentless. We’ve always been that way,” Corey Seager said. “We’ve never given at-bats away. We pass the baton, that next-man mentality. You can’t give them away even when it’s late. It’s almost more important to not give them away when it’s late. That’s a big thing we pride ourselves on and we’ve done that for a long time now.”Related Articles Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more