Death drag of ancient ammonite fossil digitized and put online

center_img A death drag is a mark left behind by a creature that recently died and was moved or dragged by another force—in this case, it was an ammonite, a mollusk with a spiral shell that lived in the sea approximately 150 million years ago. It was dragged along the sea floor after it died by the sea current and left behind a very shallow trench. Finding a death drag from a creature millions of years ago is very rare, of course, because it requires a very specific set of circumstances to occur for preservation and discovery. In this case, it was a team of paleontologists digging at a quarry back in the 1990s at a site near the town of Solnhofen in Germany—many other ancient fossils have been found there. The ammonite and its death drag were preserved and were eventually put on display in a museum in Barcelona.The death drag is approximately 8.5 meters long and grows more defined the closer it gets to the ammonite fossil. Prior research has suggested that the sea creature (which was missing its lower jaw, offering proof that it was dead prior to being dragged) was clearly quite buoyant when it began scraping the bottom, due to decomposition gasses inside of its shell—thus, it was just barely touching the bottom and able to leave only grooves at the edges. As time passed, gas seeped from the shell and the creature was dragged more heavily through the sediment, leaving a more defined trench. Prior research also suggested the trench was likely at a depth of 20 to 60 meters and was likely created due to a gentle underwater current.In this new effort, the researchers used a technique called photogrammetry to create digitized imagery of the death drag and the fossil—hundreds of images were made from multiple angles which were all stitched together to create a 3-D model. The result is a model available for download or online in video format. (Phys.org)—A team of workers with members from institutions in the U.K., Germany and Spain has put online a digitized 3-D model of the “death drag” of an ammonite fossil—it is one of the longest ever found for such an ancient creature. They have also written a paper describing both the death drag and fossil and have posted it on the open access site PLOS ONE. The ammonite Subplanites rueppellianus, the producer of the drag mark (MCFO 0492). Credit: PLOS ONE (2017). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0175426 © 2017 Phys.orglast_img read more

Why starch in bananas potatoes may be good for health

first_imgConsuming foods such as bananas, potatoes, grains and legumes that are rich in resistant starch may help check blood sugar, enhance satiety as well as improve gut health, a study has found.Resistant starch is a form of starch that is not digested in the small intestine and is therefore considered a type of dietary fibre.“We know that adequate fibre intake – at least 30 grams per day – is important for achieving a healthy, balanced diet, which reduces the risk of developing a range of chronic diseases,” said Stacey Lockyer, Nutrition Scientist at British Nutrition Foundation, a Britain-based charity.  Also Read – Add new books to your shelfApart from occurring naturally in foods, resistant starch is also produced or modified commercially and incorporated into food products. Unlike the typical starch, resistant starch acts like a type of fibre in the body as it does not get digested in the small intestine, but is is fermented in the large intestine.This dietary fibre then increases the production of short chain fatty acids in the gut, which act as an energy source for the colonic cells, thus improving the gut health and increasing satiety. According to the researchers, there is consistent evidence that consumption of resistant starch can aid blood sugar control. It has also been suggested that resistant starch can support gut health and enhance satiety via increased production of short chain fatty acids.“Whilst findings support positive effects on some markers, further research is needed in most areas to establish whether consuming resistant starch can confer significant benefits that are relevant to the general population. However, this is definitely an exciting area of nutritional research for the future,” Lockyer said.The study was published in the journal Nutrition Bulletin.last_img read more

WCD Minister celebrates Yoga day with pregnant women

first_imgPractising Yoga during pregnancy gives the ability to stay calm and eases most physical problems, said Maneka Sanjay Gandhi, Minister for Women and Child Development, who attended a yoga session with pregnant women in National Institute of Public Cooperation and Child Development(NIPCCD), New Delhi.The Ministry of Women and Child Development celebrated 4th International Day of Yoga through various activities. During the session, Gandhi interacted with the expecting mothers who shared their experiences of practising prenatal yoga. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe Minister performed asanas along with the pregnant women under the guidance of yoga trainer so as to encourage the practice of prenatal yoga. She emphasised the importance of yoga for pregnant women. However, the prenatal yoga must be practised only under qualified instructors, the Minister stressed.She further added that making Yoga an integral part of life has holistic benefits and it can help especially pregnant mothers by giving the ability to stay calm and eases most physical problems during the nine months. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveAfter participating in the prenatal yoga session, the Minister also said that regularly practising prenatal yoga can help in preparing the women’s body for normal delivery. She shared her own daily yoga routine and urged people to perform yoga for staying healthy and happy adding how Pranayama has been found to have exceptional benefits during pregnancyBesides Gandhi, other officials of the Ministry, led by Secretary Rakesh Srivastava also enthusiastically participated in the yoga session.last_img read more