Two bloggers held by Revolutionary Guards could face death penalty

first_img News June 9, 2021 Find out more RSF_en News Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 February 25, 2021 Find out more to go further Follow the news on Iran News Receive email alerts Call for Iranian New Year pardons for Iran’s 21 imprisoned journalistscenter_img Reporters Without Borders is very concerned about serious human rights violations by the Revolutionary Guards against journalists and netizens held in Iranian prisons. Prosecutors may be about to request the death penalty for two bloggers who have been detained since 2008, Vahid Asghari and Hossein Derakhshan.“The serious charges against Asghari and Derakhshan, which are completely groundless, are punishable by the death penalty under Islamic law,” Reporters Without Borders said. “The international community must intervene and demand explanations from President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who is backed by the Revolutionary Guards, and from the judicial authorities, who are abusing the law.”Organised Crime Surveillance CentreEver since its creation by the Revolutionary Guards in March 2009, the Organised Crime Surveillance Centre has played an active role in tracking down and arresting outspoken netizens. Shortly after its creation, the centre announced the dismantling of a “malevolent” online network in March 2009 and the arrests of several website moderators. Their photos and “confessions” were posted on the centre’s website, Gerdab (www.gerdab.ir), a few days later. They reportedly admitted to links with websites that criticised Islam and the government, and to their intention of “misleading” Iranian youth by publicising porn sites. They also confessed to participating in a plot supported by the Americans and Israelis.On 17 June 2009, two days after President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s disputed reelection triggered a wave of street protests, the centre issued a communiqué announcing that it had noted “several cases of websites and personal blogs posting articles inciting disturbances of public order and urging the population to rebel.”“These sites, created with the help of American and Canadian companies, receive the support of media that are protected by the American and British security services such as the BBC, Radio Farda (Free Europe) and Radio Zamaneh,” the statement added, urging website managers to suppress “content that incites the population to riot and spreads threats and rumours.”One of the Revolutionary Guard commanders, Ebrahim Jabari, officially confirmed on 20 May of this year that a “cyber army” had been created to crack down on “destructive” online networks. The “cyber army” has reportedly been responsible for the arrests of hundreds of netizens and attacks on such websites as Twitter and the Radio Zamaneh site.Prison conditions, forced confessionsDetainees have been subjected to long periods of solitary confinement and to torture to obtain confessions that are used in their trials. Asghari, a leading target of the “network dismantling” policy, is one of the victims of such abuses. Aged 24 and an ICT student in India, he was arrested on 11 May 2008 at Tehran airport for possessing several credit cards. He is still awaiting trial more than two years later. He was held in solitary confinement for seven month and was mistreated and tortured to make him confess to organising a pornographic network that blasphemed Islam and criticised the government in order to pervert Iranian youth. And what was Asghari’s crime? Hosting websites, including the sites of government opponents.“I was beaten with a stick for hours and hours while blindfolded and handcuffed,” he wrote in a letter to the president of the 15th chamber of the Revolutionary Court on 17 October 2009. “With a knife against my throat, I was threatened with death and rape. I and my family were insulted. I was forced to make a confession and sign it. They then videoed my confession and broadcast the video with the national television station’s complicity although I was legally presumed to be innocent.”According to article 168 of the constitution, defendants prosecuted on political charges should be given public, jury trials but most of the trials have been held behind closed doors. Their lawyers are often sidelined and denied access to the case files and in some cases defendants were not told they had been tried and condemned. Asghari said in his letter: “I have never seen my lawyer and, even in court, I did not have the right to say hello to him.”Asghari also wrote: “I was alleged to have received money from abroad as a result of Google advertising on the websites I hosted. I was accused of insulting the Shiite Imams and the Prophet because of their content. And I was forced to say that Hossein Derakhshan was an agent of both the Iranian ministry of intelligence and the CIA.”Derakhshan, who has Iranian and Canadian dual nationality, was arrested by Revolutionary Guards on 1 November 2008. He was given a trial without due process and has remained in detention even since awaiting the court’s verdict.A trumped-up charge of “insulting government leaders and Islam’s holy texts” was brought against him although he clearly defended not only the Islamic revolution’s principles but also President Ahmadinejad’s policies in his blog entries. He appears to be a collateral victim of the in-fighting between the Revolutionary Guards and the Iranian intelligence services.Two other bloggers, Kouhyar Goudarzi and Hossien Ronaghi Maleki, are also being held in extremely arduous conditions.“Canada and the rest of the international community must redouble their efforts to get the Iranian authorities to release all of the imprisoned netizens and journalists,” Reporters Without Borders added. Nine netizens and 26 journalists are currently detained in Iran, which is on the Reporters Without Borders list of “Enemies of the Internet.” Help by sharing this information News September 23, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Two bloggers held by Revolutionary Guards could face death penalty March 18, 2021 Find out more Organisation After Hengameh Shahidi’s pardon, RSF asks Supreme Leader to free all imprisoned journalists IranMiddle East – North Africa IranMiddle East – North Africa last_img read more

Council told to park plans to remove Abbeyfeale car spaces

first_imgTwitter Linkedin Fianna Fáil TD Niall Collins appointed as Minister of State €1.5 million boost for five County Limerick towns from Rural Regeneration and Development Fund NewsLocal NewsCouncil told to park plans to remove Abbeyfeale car spacesBy Alan Jacques – January 8, 2015 832 TAGSAbbeyfealeCllr Francis FoleyCllr John SheahanCllr Liam GalvinFianna FáilFine GaellimerickLimerick City and County CouncilMunicipal District of Newcastle West Decision to enter Phase 4 of reopening Ireland deferred to August 10 by Alan [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up PROPOSED plans by the Council to remove 70 metres of on street car parking in Abbeyfeale have been described as “excessive” and “crazy” by councillors in the municipal district of Newcastle West.The proposal would involve the removal of the car parking spaces on the southern side of Main Street, opposite the junction with Colbert Terrace.Speaking at this Wednesday’s district meeting, Fine Gael councillor Liam Galvin said that it was imperative that the planning application went through at the site of the former hardware store, which has been derelict for ten years.Cllr Galvin called for an urgent meeting to be arranged on site for councillors and members of the local community with senior executive engineer Robert Gallagher.“I couldn’t support plans to remove 70 metres of parking space. This is the busiest section of the town and small businesses would suffer,” the Abbeyfeale councillor warned.“I don’t see why this planning application couldn’t go ahead without all these spaces being removed,” he said.Fianna Fail councillor Francis Foley fully agreed with Cllr Galvin and said the Council needed to use common sense.“This is a crazy situation. You will end up taking 70 metres now and another 70 metres later on as part of the overall traffic management plan for Abbeyfeale. There are other small businesses adjacent to this site and they need parking for their survival,” said Cllr Foley.Fine Gael councillor John Sheahan suggested that the proposal posed bigger questions about the overall management of Abbeyfeale. Cllr Sheahan also said that some of the money from the €32 million loan to the local authority, which was approved by councillors last October to kickstart the 2030 development, should be used for the betterment of county towns.Sinn Fein councillor Seamus Browne also described the plans to remove 70 metres of car parking space from Abbeyfeale’s main street as “excessive”.“It is important for the town that this application goes forward, but 70 metres is a bit much when there is already an entrance into site with its own parking spaces. We need to look into the future and look at how this will effect other businesses in the area,” said Cllr Browne. New role for Cllr John Sheahan Printcenter_img Previous articleNew Year brings in evictionsNext articleExclusive: Limerick’s John Galvin calls time on career Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Facebook WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Advertisement Email Top Fianna Fáil councillor will reject Green coalition deal Abbeyfeale company getting back to worklast_img read more

Lifford Hospital group says they feel abandoned

first_img WhatsApp Harps come back to win in Waterford Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR AudioHomepage BannerNews Pinterest By News Highland – March 20, 2019 Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Google+ Previous articleLarge turnout encouraged for St Joseph’s Hospital marchNext articleAlmost €80,000 worth of Cannabis seized in West Donegal News Highland The Chair of the Friends of Lifford Hospital claims the hospital is being abandoned in favour of progressing the St Joseph’s Community Hospital project.Lifford, Ramelton and Stranorlar community hospitals had originally campaigned under the banner of Save Our Services.However, Saturday’s protest is being organised by the Save our St Joseph’s Hospital Action Committee.Speaking on the Nine til Noon Show today, Chair of the Friends of Lifford Hospital, John Quinn believes a united approach is needed:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/johnquinn5pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. WhatsApp Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Twitter Lifford Hospital group says they feel abandoned DL Debate – 24/05/21 Pinterest FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 last_img read more

Arteta: Lack of fans creating less pressure for Arsenal

first_imgArsenal boss Mikel Arteta admits that empty stadiums may be helping his team. The Gunners have been impressive in their past few games, especially with their 2-0 win away to Wolverhampton Wanderers. It gives them an outside shot at a Champions League spot, while a Europa League place is in reach. And Arteta thinks empty stadiums mean less pressure, allowing his team to play their natural game. “When they play in front of 80,000 people it is much harder, mostly when they’re on the ball or the ball is coming close to them,” he told reporters.Advertisement Loading… “Others need that extra motivation, extra pressure, extra passion to perform better. read also:Arteta confirms ankle injury for David Luiz “Every player is a bit different.” Asked if his players seemed less rushed against Wolves, Arteta said: “I agree.” Arteta will hope his team can continue that form at home against Leicester City in midweek. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more