Scientific Supporters of ES Stem Cell Research Fear Future Abuses

first_img“How would you know if a human brain was trapped in a mouse’s body?”  This frightful and intriguing question opened an article in Nature this week.1  More on that in a minute.    Last week, in the Oct. 14 issue,2 a Nature editorial on California’s Stem Cell Proposition 71 stated that “the proposal is less of an unalloyed blessing than it seems.”  Though most professional scientists are eager for funds to test embryonic stem cells, Nature feared that the proposition goes overboard.  It amends the state constitution, threatens a state economy that is near insolvency, and promises it will pay for itself, “But it is not clear that these analyses hold water.”  Worst of all, it prevents oversight by the state legislature, expecting the researchers to police themselves.  Surprisingly, Nature supports government oversight of scientific funding.  The NIH and NSF at the federal level, which operate under the scrutiny of Congress, perform a healthy role: “At these agencies, scientific merit is judged almost entirely by the community itself, but Congress ultimately ensures that the public good is paramount.”  No such policing comes with Prop. 71, however, and the money trail looks too tempting:Proposition 71, in contrast, would introduce a new model for the support of scientific research at the state level that would rely on mere transparency as a guarantee against abuse.  Although public meetings are promised, the oversight committee would consist mainly of people with close ties to the universities, institutes and companies that stand to benefit from the money spent.  Most of the rest are representatives of disease groups.  The committee makes the ultimate funding decisions and will be allowed to modify NIH rules of informed consent and human-subject protection as it sees fit.    The advocacy of such people as the actor Christopher Reeve – whose untimely death this week deprives biomedical research of one of its most forceful and effective lobbyists – has helped to elevate the promise of embryonic-stem-cell research, sometimes to unrealistic levels.  It is up to the people of California whether they want to approve Proposition 71.  But if they do, researchers must strive to ensure that no funds will be abused, and they must give full consideration to a wide array of ethical concerns.  Anything less risks damaging public trust in science.Yet how effective can self-policing by researchers be, when the temptations for grant money, prizes and lucrative pharmaceutical contracts threaten to make ethics take a back seat?  This was the subject of the editorials this week in Nature1 and Science3 about feeble first attempts in Washington to decide what is right or wrong.  The lack of clear guidelines on stem cell research occasioned the question about human brain cells in mice: how would anyone know?  If the researcher feels he has to experiment with chimeras (see BreakPoint commentary) to find a cure, on what basis will the scientific community claim it is unethical, and how could they stop it?    Erika Check wrote about prominent biologists debating such questions just in the last few days at the US National Academies, now that California’s Prop. 71 is already on the ballot and appears poised for an easy win, especially since the state’s popular governor, Arnold Schwarzenegger, has endorsed it along with Michael J. Fox and other celebrities.  Since no clear guidelines exist, and no federal policies have the force of law, the scientists have a free rein to create their own consensus about what is ethical.  The vacuum has allowed some already to charge ahead into areas that are blurring the line between human and animal:Researchers at the meeting agreed on a lot: that the use of human embryonic stem cells to produce a baby should be banned, for example, and that stem-cell researchers should adopt guidelines to reassure the public that their work is ethically sound.  But they differed on how to handle chimaeras, which mix cells and DNA from different species….    Scientists could even construct a mouse whose entire brain was made of human-derived cells….The article quotes Irving Weissman of Stanford who is already creating human-mouse chimeras with private funds.  Weissman claims the “yuck factor” is no reason to ban such research.  The fact that the government so far has not taken the lead in establishing guidelines puts the burden on the scientists themselves, but is this the fox guarding the henhouse?  “That leaves a hole for scientists, who are not sure what the law permits them to do, and lack guidance on their work’s impact on public opinion.”  How, then, can they “reassure the public that their work is ethically sound?”    Speaking for Science,3 Constance Holden provided more details on the meeting of scientists last week in Washington, DC.  The scientists seemed to agree on little more than the need for guidelines.  They admitted that there is no clear distinction between “stem cell research” and “cloning” even among biotech investors, though the public is usually reassured that cloning is bad.  And they could not answer such basic questions as, “what does it mean to accord an early embryo ‘respect’?”  It didn’t help to hear a legal expert confide, “much assisted reproduction is human experimentation in the name of treatment.”  The potential for deceiving a gullible public appears more powerful than ethical concerns, especially from the so-called religious right (see 09/27/2004 headline). EurekAlert reported that the UN is also considering talks about the ethics of therapeutic cloning, as ES stem cell research is called.  Dr. Gerald Schatten (U. of Pittsburgh) argues research first, ethics later as he admits that ES stem cells have no track record: “Will therapeutic cloning create immune matching?  It’s unclear.  At this point, we don’t even know if human embryonic stem cells are safe, let alone effective.  What’s important is that research be allowed to continue so we can find out.”    The bottom line: the race toward this potentially lucrative technology by states and other countries seems to be outpacing concerns about ethics, even though there is no evidence ES stem cells will cure anything (while adult stem cells already have plenty).  Now that they are on the verge of getting their way, the scientists are having one last twinge of conscience before charging full steam ahead.1Erica Check, “Biologists seek consensus on guidelines for stem-cell research,” Nature 431, 885 (21 October 2004); doi:10.1038/431885a.2Editorials: “California dreaming,” Nature 431, 723 (14 October 2004); doi:10.1038/431723a3Constance Holden, “Bioethics: Stem Cell Researchers Mull Ideas for Self-Regulation,” Science, Vol 306, Issue 5696, 586, 22 October 2004, [DOI: 10.1126/science.306.5696.586].If anyone should have a voice in the ethics of stem cell research, it should be Joni Eareckson Tada, the advocate for the disabled who has spent the last 37 years in a wheelchair herself.  She has done far more than the TV celebrities to help the afflicted.  Her organization “Joni and Friends” has supplied over 25,000 wheelchairs to the disabled poor in Africa and other third world countries.  Moreover, she could certainly be expected to look with hope over any therapies that might allow her to walk again.  Yet she remains a staunch opponent of embryonic stem cell research, for good reasons, as explained on the bioethics page of her website JoniAndFrends.org.    Joni has appeared on radio talk shows and TV interviews, such as in a debate last week on Faith Under Fire.  The clarity of her logic is unimpeachable.  Yet it is unlikely that she can overcome the tear-jerking, emotional commercials by celebrity actors that tug at the heartstrings with empty promises that embryonic stem cells might cure your grandmother of Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease, despite no track record and many problems (while adult stem cells are flourishing: for another example, see EurekAlert report this week about skin cells fighting brain tumors).  Meanwhile, beneficiaries of Prop. 71 stand to make a killing on taxpayer funds.  Follow the money trail: why don’t private investors support ES stem cell research?  Yet the taxpayers are going to have to foot the bill for a possible boondoggle that may take decades to show any results– maybe never, while a class of human beings will be created to be destroyed for scientific research (a good time to re-read John Durkin’s letter; see 09/03/2004 headline).  Since California voters never seem to find a bond issue they didn’t like, even when living in a state climbing out of near bankruptcy, the world is staged to see the next chapter in our brave new world opening on November 2.  Maybe the scientists will figure out how to be “ethical” while they’re laughing on the way to the bank.(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

atdoshop Rhinestones Peacock Feather Bridal Wedding Hair Clip Pin Head Hairpin : Peacock hair accessorie

first_imgThis is very nice can even be worn on ladies jacket good price good delivery. Lovely and sits close to your head. Atdoshop Rhinestones Peacock Feather Bridal Wedding Hair Clip Pin Head HairpinWear as a hair clip or broochPerfect for weddings, proms, formal events or any other special occasionQuantity: 1This specially designed feather hair clip is great as either a hair or apparel accessory. Its bright colors and dazzling rhinestones are sure to make you stand out in a crowdMaterial: Feathers & Rhinestones Just like the picture, very pleased & very cheap, but looks more expensive. Pretty and holds in place well. Pretty and holds in place well. Atdoshop Rhinestones Peacock Feather Bridal Wedding Hair Clip Pin Head Hairpin : Lovely and sits close to your head. Feathers get damaged easily. Don’t know how they do it for the money. Feathers get damaged easily, so be careful with them. Just like the picture, very pleased & very cheap, but looks more expensive. This is very nice can even be worn on ladies jacket good price good delivery. Spectacular colors and perfectly manufactured. The diamantes are incredibly obvious and sparkly much too, it appears to be like its really worth much more than i paid for it. It arrived two months early way too so im properly impressed.Spectacular colors and perfectly manufactured. The diamantes are incredibly obvious and sparkly much too, it appears to be like its really worth much more than i paid for it. It arrived two months early way too so im properly impressed. SummaryReviewer Nathalie DuboisReview Date2017-11-04 14:29:16Reviewed Item Atdoshop Rhinestones Peacock Feather Bridal Wedding Hair Clip Pin Head HairpinRating 5.0 / 5  stars, based on  7  reviewsPrice£5.00last_img read more

Saina, Sindhu enter quarters; Lin Dan, Lee Chong Wei ousted

first_imgBy Amit Kumar Das New Delhi, Mar 31 (PTI) Defending champion Saina Nehwal and two-time World Championship bronze medallist PV Sindhu advanced to the quarterfinals but it turned out to be a dismal day for star shuttlers Lin Dan and Lee Chong Wei, who crashed out of the India Open Super Series here today. Sindhu was a little circumspect during the match and committed a few unforced errors before surpassing Thailand?s Busanan Ongbumrungphan 17-21 21-19 21-16 in a womens singles match that lasted an hour and 16 minutes here. She will next take on Koreas Bae Yeon Ju, who beat Japans Yui Hashimoto 21-16 21-10 in another match. Later in the day, Saina saw off Nitchaon Jindapol of Thailand 21-19 21-14 to set up a clash with Korean fifth seed Sung Ji Hyun. However, the highlight of the day was the stunning losses of two-time silver medallist Lee Chong Wei and five-time World Championship Lin Dan, considered to be the biggest contenders for the Rio Games gold medal. While Koreas Son Wan Ho stunned the six-time All England champion Lin Dan of China, seeded fourth, 21-13 22-20, former World no. 1 Lee, top seed, suffered a 19-21 19-21 loss to Hong Kongs Wei Nan, ranked World No. 14. Two more top 10 players bite the dust in men?s singles at the Siri Fort Sports Complex here. While Xue Song saw off Denmark Jan O Jorgensen, seeded 3rd, 21-18 15-21 21-14 to emerge as the only surviving Chinese in mens singles, Germanys Marc Zwiebler stunned Chinese seventh seed Tian Houwei, who had reached the finals of the All England Championship, 18-21 21-19 23-21 in a thrilling contest in the mens singles. Among other Indians, Rituparna Das sank without trace against fourth seed Ratchanok Intanon of Thailand 9-21 4-21 in just 21 minutes in a womens singles clash. In womens doubles, Mohita Sahdev and Sanjana Santosh defeated compatriot Ch Poornima and Rachita Sahdev 21-16 21-7. They will meet Japanese combo of Naoko Fukuman and Kurumi Yonao. Manu Attri and B Sumeeth Reddy suffered a 19-21 12-21 loss to Chinese Taipeis Chen Hung Ling and Chi-Lin Wang, while Jishnu Sanyal and Shivam Sharma lost 17-21 15-21 to Chinese Taipeis Lee Sheng Mu and Tsai Chia Hsin in another mens doubles match. Indian pair of Gauri Asaji and Karishma Wadkar also suffered an embarrasing 5-21 7-21 loss to top seeds Nitya Krishinda Maheswari and Greysia Polii of Indonesia in womens doubles, while Manu and Ashwini Ponnappa also lost 10-21 17-21 to Chinese pair of Zhang Wen and Jia Yifan. PTI ATK KHS KHSadvertisementlast_img read more

Kristin KreukStarrer Burden of Truth Loses Showrunners

first_imgAdvertisement Noelle Carbone and Adriana Maggs have stepped down from the Entertainment One, ICF Films and Eagle Vision legal drama.The Kristin Kreuk-starrer Burden of Truth has lost its showrunners.Noelle Carbone and Adriana Maggs have stepped down as showrunners on the legal drama that stars Kreuk as a big city lawyer passed over for partnership who returns to her hometown to take on what she thinks is a simple case, only to find herself in a fight for justice for a group of sick girls. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment READ MORE Advertisement Facebook Advertisement Login/Register With: Twitterlast_img

PROPS FROM VANCOUVERFILMED DEADPOOL UP FOR AUCTION NEXT MONTH

first_imgThe mask, which is worn by character Wade Wilson early in the film, is advertised as being screen-used which means it is the actual item featured on screen during filming.As of Monday afternoon, the highest bid for the Deadpool mask was U.S.$50.Other items from the movie include a white hospital uniform complete with costume blood splatter worn by Reynolds during a scene in which his character is tortured in order to trigger a mutant gene, a frying pan used by Reynolds during a fight scene, and the silver boots worn by Josh Brolin’s character Cable.A pair of pants worn by Blind Al (played by Leslie Uggams), a leather vest and long-sleeve shirt worn by Angel Dust (played by Gina Carano), a rubber-coated piece of bent rebar used in a fight between Deadpool and Ajax (played by Ed Skrein), and a compression shirt worn by Reynolds are also up for auction.The Deadpool items are available for preview online at icollector.com.Bids are now being accepted online at icollector.com or by phone at 1-888-761-7767 until the auction goes live at 11 a.m. PT on June 1.The first Deadpool movie filmed in Vancouver in 2015 and included a high-profile closing of the Georgia Street Viaduct over multiple days for a complex fight scene involving flipped cars. The second movie began shooting in B.C. in 2017.By Stephanie IP ~ Vancouver Sun LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment The most recognizable prop for sale from the franchise is perhaps a red Deadpool mask, displayed on and sold with a face cast of Reynolds’ actual face. The cast is made of latex foam and is mounted for display. Advertisement Login/Register With: Fans of the Vancouver-filmed Deadpool franchise can now place their bids on some of the quirkiest props from the film, which was filmed here in Vancouver. The cast of Deadpool is pictured in this 2015 file photo filming a scene on the Georgia Street Viaduct in Vancouver, B.C. ARLEN REDEKOP / PNG Fans of the Vancouver-filmed Deadpool franchise can now place their bids on some of the quirkiest props from the film.L.A.’s Premier Props is hosting an online memorabilia auction on June 1, allowing fans the chance to take home a piece of Hollywood’s biggest titles.Among the approximately 500 items up for sale are a selection of props from the first and second instalments of the Deadpool franchise, both of which star the Vancouver-born Ryan Reynolds and which were filmed here in B.C. Facebook Advertisement Twitter Advertisementlast_img read more