Artists to take over Limerick park kiosk

first_imgNewsLocal NewsArtists to take over Limerick park kioskBy Editor – November 12, 2014 1313 WhatsApp Carl Doran and Norma Lowney at the People’s Park kioskOVER the coming months, the kiosk at Limerick’s People’s Park will reopen as part of a series of multidisciplinary residencies.As part of the Limerick City of Culture programme, artists were asked to respond to a simple question:  “What would you do if you could have The Park Kiosk for a month?Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The first project in the Park Kiosk from November 17 is ‘Dog Tales’ by Carl Doran and it should prove of special interest to the city’s dog-owners.Carl explained, “I am inviting dog-owners to drop in for a short chat about their dogs. There will be tea and coffee available, a comfortable space for the dog and possibly some doggy treats too!”Carl will then photograph and draw the dog and during his final week in the kiosk he will make artwork for each dog/owner. The project will conclude with presentations, a reception for dogs/owners and a group dog walk.The kiosk has been in its city centre location since the mid-19th century and witnessed 150 years of changes within the city, until the last JR ice pop was sold in the late 1980’s.Each month will offer a new experience, as artists present work made specifically for this iconic building on the southern side of The People’s Park.The kiosk’s interior will be transformed into a green building promoting Limerick as an environmentally friendly and ecologically rich city as part of a project by artist Mary Conroy“I’m very excited about being given the opportunity to work in this little piece of history in the beautiful People’s Park. I’m looking forward to creating something new through a collaborative process”, she said.The artists have all approached the possibility of re-opening the kiosk in different ways. Some see it as a studio, a theatre, community centre and of course a shop. Each month the kiosk, its history and how it relates to The People’s Park and the city will be explored through different media and art forms.Norma Lowney’s project ‘The Theatre Shop’ will  transform the kiosk into a performance space. Norma will develop a piece of theatre based of shared memories of the kiosk, the People’s Park and of Limerick City of Culture to be performed in the kiosk in the run up to Christmas.For opening times visit limerickcityofculture.ie TAGSCarl DoranCity of Culturefeaturedfull-imagelimerickMary ConroyNorma LowneyPark KioskPeople’s Park WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Previous articleLimerick welcomes Andrew Stanley unrobedNext articlePensioners arrested in CIRA probe Editor Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Email Advertisementcenter_img Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Linkedin Print Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed livelast_img read more

Administrator called in to ailing bagel supplier

first_imgLondon-based manufacturer The Bagel Group has gone into administration, with around 80 jobs believed to be at risk. The company, previously known as Mr Bagels, produces bagels under the Mr Bagels brand and filed for administration on 16 January 2009. MCR Corporate Restructuring is administrator. Mr Bagels was set up in 1988 by the Kahalani brothers, Paul and Avi and, in 1996, became a limited company. The firm supplies bagels to the retail and foodservice markets. The Bagel Group hit national headlines in December after alleging an executive at rival Maple Leaf Foods was involved in attempted price-fixing – an allegation that is still under investigation. The Bagel Group declined to comment.last_img

OCS leader discusses office’s plans for year

first_imgThe Office of Community Standards, more commonly known as OCS, is the campus body tasked with helping students make “good choices,” office director Heather Ryan said. Particularly, she said, the office deals with “social” misconduct — such as alcohol and parietals violations. Changes to office procedures this year are small: it is amending its process for student expulsion appeals as well as expanding its online platform for reporting incidents.“We educate the on-campus community about standards of conduct, as well as about expectations for what it means to live in community,” Ryan said. “We work very closely with folks in residential life, because they work with most of our students in that space. We also oversee the student conduct process for all students. … We work with students to help them understand how to gain insight into their values, get a better understanding of the impact of decision-making on themselves, on the community and make sure they can make a plan to be more aligned with expectations and also how to implement that plan.”While some of OCS work is disciplinary in nature, Ryan said the office’s main responsibility is helping students to grow. She said there are three levels of disciplinary gatherings: meetings, conferences and hearings. Of the three, expulsion from the University is only a possibility in the last option.“For the most part, especially in the conference and meeting settings, the outcome is really focused on formation and growth and trying to help students understand how to make a better choice in the future, or maybe make safer choices,” she said. “The hearing is a little bit more administrative, so having some of those conversations but dismissal is a possible outcome.”Much of the work, Ryan said, centers around conversations with students.“A conference would happen at a table, and we talk,” she said. “I think there’s a lot of lore out there, but we’re having conversations for the most part.”While OCS did not spearhead any new policies this year, the office did make some changes regarding appeals for cases in which expulsion from the University was a possibility, Ryan said.“There weren’t any new policies — those were not updated this year because we made some updates last year and felt like we were in a good place with that for the time being,” she said. “We did make an update to clarify information about the grounds for case review for permanent dismissal outcomes. We learned from students who were participating in that process that it would be helpful to have a little bit more understanding of what grounds would look like and how to organize something like that.”Ryan said the main change was ensuring the response appropriately fit the misconduct.“Initially, the grounds typically talked about sharing information about why [the case] should be reviewed,” she said. “Typically, students would coordinate those based on procedural defect, or substantive new information or a concern that the outcome was not appropriate for the behavior that was exhibited. So matching the actual identification of that through the process with what they had actually been using it for.”As in previous school years, Ryan said OCS’ priority is to make sure students are behaving safely and responsibly.“We want to make sure we’re continuing to educate the campus community about standards and about health, safety and how to make reports if you have concerns. We’re a campus that’s really committed to being our brothers’ and sisters’ keepers,” she said. “We want to make sure people know how to do that. We’re working to get into the halls a little bit more and to help students understand the expectation of responsibility. We know that being concerned about another student that sometimes there are barriers to getting them help and we want to make sure we’re helping them to understand and removing some of those barriers.”To that end, Ryan also said OCS is seeking to promote its Speak Up program, a website where students and community members can report incidents. Though the resource has been available for some time, Ryan said OCS is trying to make it more widely known.“It’s a website that has information about reporting and about resources,” she said. “It is not anonymous, but it does offer the opportunity to reach out for information. Making a report does not necessarily mean that it moves forward in different directions. You have some agency with that … We realized it’s not in the vernacular. We want to make sure we change that.”Ryan advised students to always seek help for others in need.“One of the pieces I would like to make sure we continue working on is understanding the expectation of responsibility,” she said. “I think it’s really important that students understand that helping a friend is never a bad idea. Students and everybody in our community’s health and safety is paramount. I really want to encourage folks to lean more about that. If a student is referred, and you’re getting someone help and you stay and comply, folks are going to get the assistance that they need and disciplinary status outcomes are typically not in play. I want to make sure people know that they can get people help. It’s really important.”On the whole, Ryan said OCS’ work is intended to guide students down the path that will allow them to attain success in their college careers.“We make mistakes, and that’s how we learn,” Ryan said. “My hope is that when we have conversations with students — whether that’s in the meeting setting with rectors or in our office through conference and hearing settings — that a student is heard, and that we’ve identified outcomes that are going to address some of the underlying concerns so they can move forward. The bulk of our students are not going to be dismissed. My hope is that they can continue and graduate as successful students.”Tags: office of community standards, Responsibility, safety, Speak Up!last_img read more