Collectors in Conversation Continues with Social Justice Art Historian Carol A. Wells

first_imgPhoto Gallery Collectors in Conversation Continues with Social Justice Art Historian Carol A. Wells STAFF REPORTS | Photo courtesy ALLENDALE BRANCH LIBRARY Published on Monday, October 14, 2013 | 3:10 pm Subscribe Community News Make a comment Herbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyUnapologetic Celebs Women AdoreHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty11 Ayurveda Heath Secrets From Ancient IndiaHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyBohemian Summer: How To Wear The Boho Trend RightHerbeautyHerbeauty 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena More Cool Stuff Top of the News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday center_img Business News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS The Allendale Branch Library continues its “Collectors in Conversation” series with a discussion with Carol A. Wells, an art historian, curator, and founding director of the Center for the Study of Political Graphics, on Saturday, October 26, 2013, at 2:00 p.m., at 1130 S. Marengo Ave., Pasadena.The discussion will be moderated by retired photojournalist Fred Glienna.The Center for the Study of Political Graphics is a Culver City-based educational and research archive with more than 80,000 domestic and international social movement posters from the 19th century to the present. Wells has produced more than 75 poster exhibitions which have traveled to over 300 venues throughout the United States and internationally. Her articles on political graphics have appeared in numerous publications and catalogues, including Peace Press Graphics 1967-1987: Art in the Pursuit of Social Change, which Wells co-edited as part of the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time initiative.Wells, who has been involved in social justice since her high school days, had an epiphany about the power of political graphics when a UCLA professor hired her to travel to Nicaragua in 1981 to collect posters for him after the Sandinistas had come to power. One day in Managua, Wells watched a young boy stop to read a poster from a Sandinista women’s organization. The slogan on the poster, which featured the image of a woman holding a basket of coffee beans, read, “In constructing the new country, we are becoming new women.” Wells said, “I watched the kid trying to figure out what this means. It made him ask the question, ‘Why is someone saying that?’ That’s how posters work. They attract your attention when you’re not expecting it and they challenge you to think about the world differently.” Thus began Wells’s fascination for collecting posters, which combined her two lifelong passions of art and politics, and eventually led to the formation of the Center for the Study of Political Graphics in 1989.“Collectors in Conversation” is an ongoing series of quarterly programs which showcases the wonderful world of collectors and collections, both private and institutional, and their ability to amaze, inspire, and enlighten the public.The program is free of charge and open to the public; light refreshments will be served.For further information, contact the Allendale Branch Library at (626) 744-7260 or visit pasadenapubliclibrary.net. More details are also available at the Allendale Branch Library Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/allendalebranch Community News First Heatwave Expected Next Week Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m.last_img read more

Golden Age Home gets Generator

first_imgThe Ministry of Labour and Social Security has collaborated with the Golden Age Home (GAH) in Vineyard Town, Kingston, to procure a generator  for the home.General Manager of the Home, Laurette Adams-Thomas, told JIS News that the generator has helped to alleviate some challenges that the institution encounters once there  is a power outage.“The residents would be in total darkness and we would have to use lanterns and flashlights,” Mrs. Thomas said.Prior to the acquisition of the generator, power outages would result in spoilage of perishable foods stored in the cold room and also affect the timely operation of the home’s laundry department.“The laundry room staff would sometimes have to hand-wash for the residents and this would result in the accumulation of  clothing, due to the amount to be washed.  This would affect the staff’s ability to provide clean bed linen and clothing, which are needed on a daily basis,” Mrs. Thomas explained.Mrs. Thomas lauded the GAH staff for the instrumental work being done over the years in caring for the residents and ensuring the smooth operations of the facility.She said corporate Jamaica, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), Faith- based institutions and private donors have assisted the home with acquiring other well-needed items. However, the home is still in need of equipment, including an industrial heater, which costs approximately $2 million. The dryer will assist the home to provide clean bed linen and clothes in a timely manner for the 454 residents.“I am not daunted by the challenges we encounter at the Golden Age Home, because I am motivated by challenges. I have a passion for caring for the elderly and I know that the Ministry Labour and Social Security, the Board of Directors, Management and Staff are doing their best to ensure that the Home is the benchmark infirmary in Jamaica,”  she told JIS News. By Shelly Ann-Irving/Sanasha Pearson, JIS Reporterslast_img read more

PROPS FROM VANCOUVERFILMED DEADPOOL UP FOR AUCTION NEXT MONTH

first_imgThe mask, which is worn by character Wade Wilson early in the film, is advertised as being screen-used which means it is the actual item featured on screen during filming.As of Monday afternoon, the highest bid for the Deadpool mask was U.S.$50.Other items from the movie include a white hospital uniform complete with costume blood splatter worn by Reynolds during a scene in which his character is tortured in order to trigger a mutant gene, a frying pan used by Reynolds during a fight scene, and the silver boots worn by Josh Brolin’s character Cable.A pair of pants worn by Blind Al (played by Leslie Uggams), a leather vest and long-sleeve shirt worn by Angel Dust (played by Gina Carano), a rubber-coated piece of bent rebar used in a fight between Deadpool and Ajax (played by Ed Skrein), and a compression shirt worn by Reynolds are also up for auction.The Deadpool items are available for preview online at icollector.com.Bids are now being accepted online at icollector.com or by phone at 1-888-761-7767 until the auction goes live at 11 a.m. PT on June 1.The first Deadpool movie filmed in Vancouver in 2015 and included a high-profile closing of the Georgia Street Viaduct over multiple days for a complex fight scene involving flipped cars. The second movie began shooting in B.C. in 2017.By Stephanie IP ~ Vancouver Sun LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment The most recognizable prop for sale from the franchise is perhaps a red Deadpool mask, displayed on and sold with a face cast of Reynolds’ actual face. The cast is made of latex foam and is mounted for display. Advertisement Login/Register With: Fans of the Vancouver-filmed Deadpool franchise can now place their bids on some of the quirkiest props from the film, which was filmed here in Vancouver. The cast of Deadpool is pictured in this 2015 file photo filming a scene on the Georgia Street Viaduct in Vancouver, B.C. ARLEN REDEKOP / PNG Fans of the Vancouver-filmed Deadpool franchise can now place their bids on some of the quirkiest props from the film.L.A.’s Premier Props is hosting an online memorabilia auction on June 1, allowing fans the chance to take home a piece of Hollywood’s biggest titles.Among the approximately 500 items up for sale are a selection of props from the first and second instalments of the Deadpool franchise, both of which star the Vancouver-born Ryan Reynolds and which were filmed here in B.C. Facebook Advertisement Twitter Advertisementlast_img read more