Baseball Jalen Washingtons transition to shortstop to benefit team

OSU senior Jalen Washington, who is transitioning from catcher to shortstop, bats during the Scarlet and Gray in late-October. Credit: Courtesy of OSU AthleticsIn January, things do not seem to be too busy around Bill Davis Stadium, home of the Ohio State baseball team. With the first game of the season not until Feb. 17, when the Buckeyes face off against Kansas State in Osceola, Florida, the players are still participating in the occasional workout and batting cage session. However, with every crack of the bat and smack of the catcher’s mitt, OSU is in the middle of one of the most integral parts of any season: creating a team identity.Senior and returning captain Jalen Washington is familiar with having to help build a team chemistry. Now as he moves from behind the plate to the shortstop, the leadership aspect of his game does not seem to be going anywhere.Ever since Washington first stepped foot onto the OSU campus, he felt he had something to prove.“Like freshman or sophomore year, I wasn’t as much of a vocal leader,” Washington said. “I was one that was always pushing the envelope trying to prove myself, trying to make a name for myself and lead by example — working my butt off on the field and off the field.”With work came reward for Washington who was named as a captain of the team heading into his junior season and even before he had played on a regular basis.“He had never been a starter before,” OSU coach Greg Beals said. “That says an awful lot about what his teammates think about him and says an awful lot about his work ethic and what he does.”This was not the only thing that made Washington stand out to his teammates and the coaching staff. It was also his ability to play all over the diamond if needed to.“Pretty much in summer ball and in high school, they used to put me at different positions every year,” Washington said. “I feel like it has always been a tool that I have had and being able to show it off on this big a stage is a pretty cool thing.”Washington’s versatility is what caused Beals to put him behind the plate to see what he could do as a catcher.“I was really intrigued by the possibility, being a catching guy myself, of working with someone of that athleticism, somebody that really hadn’t done a lot of catching before, but was a good athlete, and see if we can teach him the skills of catching,” Beals said. “I also believe that the catching position is becoming more of an athletic, a quicker, lower to the ground type of guy as opposed to the bigger, big, sturdy, strong catchers that used to be the prototype.”Washington started to perfect the art of being a leader behind the plate out of necessity.“Being a catcher is more that just catching and throwing the ball,” Washington said. “You’re the leader of the team. Everyone is looking at you.”Without ever starting a game at catcher going into the 2016 season, Washington had a .992 fielding percentage  and threw out 27 percent of potential base stealers, while also being named to the Johnny Bench Award watch list, just the fifth time a OSU catcher has been named to this list. However, his offensive approach did not match the normal stereotypical catcher.“The skill set of being an athlete is different because in that skill set, it also allows him to be a bunt guy and a run guy on the offensive side,” Beals said. “That’s very different than your normal catching prospect.”Going into the 2017 season, Beals had a different idea for how to maximize Washington’s ability for this team. He will move to shortstop with sophomore catchers Jacob Barnwell and Andrew Fishel taking the reps behind the plate, something that is not a very common move in baseball.“To go from catcher to shortstop, you don’t hear that very often,” Beals said. “It speaks volumes to Jalen’s athletic ability, his versatility as an athlete.”Washington is very proud of his flexibility on the baseball field. His work around the diamond sets him apart from many other players at the college level.“I think that it shows that I have more tools than the other guys do and I’m a little bit more versatile,” Washington said. “Being a catcher, you can show your hands and your feet, but being at shortstop, I can show more athleticism.”With the move to the infield, Washington moves from having to lead the pitcher through his outing to leading the infield. Redshirt junior pitcher Adam Niemeyer said he believes Washington’s knowledge of the game will create a smooth transition.“Last year, he did a great job controlling the game behind the plate,” Niemeyer said. “You know, being in sync with a pitcher is being on the same page. This year, moving to shortstop, really just shows how intelligent he is at the game of baseball and how he can kind of handle doing two totally different positions and do them both very well.”Moving out of the crouch, Washington can now extend his offensive ability, especially on the bases. Last season, he stole 14 bases on 19 opportunities. With the move to shortstop, Washington feels as though that his base running ability will increase dramatically.“When you are catching three, four games a weekend, your legs are pretty worn out,” Washington said. “I see myself as a base stealer, so I feel like I’ll be able to steal more bases, put our offense in better positions to have success.”No matter where Washington will be playing for this OSU team, Beals said he believes Washington will be an integral part of where the Buckeyes will end up at the end of the 2017 season and why.“Our cultural blueprint that we have for our team, one of the last sentences on it is, ‘work to earn trust every day,’ and Jalen Washington does that,” Beals said. “He works extremely hard and he has earned the trust of his teammates.” read more

The Matchup Ohio State vs Indiana

The air came out of the balloon in Ohio State football’s 2011 season with a too-close-for-comfort win against Indiana. The Buckeyes (6-0, 2-0 Big Ten) will try to avoid another deflating performance against the Hoosiers (2-3, 0-2 Big Ten) Saturday in Bloomington, Ind. OSU’s signature victory of the 2011 season came on Oct. 29 against Wisconsin in a 33-29 victory at Ohio Stadium. The next week, though, OSU disappointed in its 34-20 win against an Indiana team the Buckeyes couldn’t put away until late in the game. Last season’s win against Indiana, which finished the season 1-11, left OSU coaches and players spending post-game interviews explaining away their performance, proved to be a momentum buster – OSU lost four straight to close out the season. OSU is coming off what appears to have been the 2012 season’s signature win on Saturday, a 63-38 drubbing of visiting Nebraska. The kind of letdown OSU experienced against the Hoosiers in November 2011 seems unlikely to occur again this weekend, and the formidable OSU offense might be enough to do the Hoosiers in. The Buckeyes, ranked No. 8 in the Associated Press Top 25 poll, just posted their highest offensive output since a Sept. 21, 1996 game against Pittsburgh. OSU won that game, 72-0. The Buckeyes scored 73 points against Eastern Michigan during the 2010 season, which was later vacated. Can Indiana hang with the high-flying Buckeyes’ offensive attack, and what about the Hoosier defense? Decide for yourself after seeing how the teams match up. Offense OSU will put points on the board against Indiana, that much we know. The Buckeyes are 22nd in America with almost 39 points per game. At almost 250 yards per game, OSU is also the 10th-ranked rushing offense in the country. Leading OSU’s charge on the ground is sophomore quarterback Braxton Miller, who has 763 yards, eight touchdowns and an average of more than 127 yards per game. Miller also set a new single-game, OSU quarterback rushing record against Nebraska with 186 yards on the ground. Indiana’s offense racks up plenty of yards – the Hoosiers have the 26th-ranked total offense as they average just less than 472 yards per game and score almost 33 points per game. The Hoosiers defense has struggled at times, having allowed 41 points against Ball State on Sept. 15, 44 against Northwestern on Sept. 29 and 31 against Michigan State on Oct. 6. With that in mind, the Buckeyes’ offense could hang another big number on the scoreboard this weekend. Defense OSU and Indiana’s respective defensive units have had trouble keeping teams out of the end zone in 2012, but the Buckeyes seem to be in a better position for success on Saturday considering recent success in some areas. The Buckeyes’ defense has demonstrated a propensity for making big plays and enter Saturday’s game with 13 takeaways on the year – OSU has 10 interceptions, three fumble recoveries and two turnovers returned for a touchdown (sophomore cornerback Bradley Roby has both touchdowns). Against Nebraska, OSU tallied four sacks and nine tackles for loss despite allowing the Cornhuskers to score 38 points in the game. The Hoosiers’ defense has forced opponents into five turnovers this season, including three interceptions and two fumble recoveries. Indiana is allowing 441 yards per game in 2012 and has allowed more touchdowns (17) than any other Big Ten Conference team. Special Teams OSU junior receiver Corey Brown is coming into the matchup with Indiana with the hot special teams hands following his 76-yard punt return for a touchdown to put the game out of reach Saturday against Nebraska. For the season, OSU is averaging 12 yards per punt return, which is good enough for 33rd in America. Indiana’s punt return game doesn’t match OSU’s – the Hoosiers are averaging more than six yards per punt return. Kickoff returns are a different story – Indiana averages more than 28 yards per return in that category, and bests OSU’s nearly 20 yards per return. As far as kicking goes, OSU junior Drew Basil has connected on each field goal attempt this season, but he’s only attempted two. By contrast, Indiana redshirt junior kicker Mitch Ewald is 5-of-8 on field goal attempts. Ewald has also proven his ability from distance, connecting on 2-of-2 tried from 30-39 yards and hitting 1-of-3 tries from 40-49 yards. read more

Kenny Guiton preparing for sentimental Buckeye Senior Day

Redshirt-senior quarterback Kenny Guiton (13) dances with his teammates after a game against Purdue Nov. 2 at Ross-Ade Stadium. OSU won, 56-0.Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorFor a moment, the fans in Ohio Stadium held their breath.Then-sophomore quarterback Braxton Miller was on his way to the hospital and OSU’s undefeated season laid in the hands of then-redshirt-junior Kenny Guiton.Guiton led the Buckeyes on a game tying touchdown drive with 3 seconds left in regulation, and to an eventual 29-22 overtime win against Purdue Oct. 20, 2012.It was a moment that stands out in his five-year OSU career, Guiton said Monday, because of what it meant to the team.“No. 1, that Purdue game last year. Just coming in and (saving) a 12-0 season. You know, I don’t think that I did it on my own or anything, but just keeping that 12-0 alive and I think that was big for our seniors,” Guiton said. “Being that it was my first piece of some real action so that was pretty cool to do.”This season, Guiton has turned into somewhat of a celebrity at OSU. His entrance into the game invites chants of “Kenny G” from the Ohio Stadium crowd.Saturday at 3:30 p.m. against Indiana (4-6, 2-4) is set to be Guiton’s final game in the Horseshoe as a Buckeye. Although he enjoys hearing his name screamed by the fans, Guiton said Saturday is going to be special for his family.“I hear that a lot,” Guiton said about hearing the chants. “One thing I’m happy about, my family coming up and getting to see that. I came all the way out here from Texas and (my) family don’t get to make (it up) much so them being here and seeing that, that will be so cool. I can’t wait for that.”But Guiton said despite the highs, Senior Day is going to be very emotional for all of those involved.“I actually thought about it a lot. I’ve been talking to a lot of guys about it … and we’re just like man, we can’t talk about that. We kind of get sentimental behind it. It’s going to be a touchy day … some tears may come out but I’m hoping not.”Miller went down with an sprained MCL earlier this season, this time missing two whole games and the majority of a third. “Kenny G” came in and impressed in Miller’s absence, throwing for a program record six touchdowns against Florida A&M Sept. 21.Coach Urban Meyer said Sept. 16, the Monday after Guiton’s first career start against California, he had been impressed with the play of his backup quarterback.“It’s arguably one of the most interesting case studies I’ve ever had as a coach is the story of Kenny Guiton … can you imagine being his parent right now, how cool that would be to see his development?” Meyer said. “If you buy stock, buy stock in Kenny Guiton.”Guiton said although the moment against Purdue will always stand out, this year has been something special as well.“I can’t settle down on this year either because it’s like, I never saw myself being the national player of the week,” Guiton said.Guiton was named the national player of the week after a 52-34 win against California, when he threw for 276 yards and four touchdowns.Despite Guiton’s big numbers at times this season, and popularity among the fans, Miller remains the starter for OSU, a fact that doesn’t bother Guiton.“Braxton deserves that credit,” Guiton said. “He puts in all the work, he’s a leader. He keeps his head up when stuff’s not going right. He’s keeping the team’s head up.”Miller said Nov. 13 after practice that his relationship with Guiton has been a big help to his growth as a player while he’s been at OSU.“I look up to him as a big brother, I’ve talked to him ever since I was being recruited,” Miller said.Meyer agreed, adding that Guiton has been a big help in Braxton’s improvement since his freshman season.“Now they’re both operating at a very high level,” Meyer said Nov. 13. “They’ve practice very hard, they prepare very hard, much different than a year ago, so I think Kenny had a lot to do with it and it’s a direct results of the way he prepares, the way he practices.”Guiton said Meyer treats the players and staff like a family.“One thing about coach Meyer is he’s straightforward. He’s going to tell you what he’s feeling. He’ll let you know what type of player you are and what he’s expecting out of you,” Guiton said. “I think that’s great … Everything’s said and we’re a family. He actually treats us like a family. And I think it’s really cool.”After the No. 3-ranked Buckeyes’ (10-0, 6-0) game against the Hoosiers, Guiton will not be returning to Ohio Stadium as a player for OSU. But that doesn’t rule out a potential future in Columbus for Guiton.“I have told the coaches that I want to do the coaching thing,” Guiton said. “So I hope so.” read more

Why the imported washing machine you want is getting more expensive

Citation: Why the imported washing machine you want is getting more expensive (2018, January 26) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-imported-machine-expensive.html Consumers considering solar panels are going to feel a similar sticker shock.Responding to complaints from U.S. manufacturers who said imported goods were costing them sales, Trump slapped on tariffs—20 percent for the first 1.2 million imported washers and then 50 percent for any other washers imported in year one. The tariff on washers will be in effect for three years, though the tariff percentage will decline in subsequent years.The move could mean that consumers pay $50 to $90 more for machines made by South Korean manufacturers such Samsung and LG, although other foreign washer manufacturers such as Electrolux and Miele will not escape the tariff.Solar cells, largely imported from China, are also being slapped with a tariff—30 percent in the first year.The Trump administration said the move is meant to return manufacturing jobs to the U.S.Benton Harbor, Mich.,-based Whirlpool Corp., whose 2011 petition to the Commerce Department prompted Trump’s action, said it added 200 full-time jobs at an Ohio plant in anticipation of the tariffs.Whirlpool called the tariffs “a win for American manufacturing jobs” and said it expects the industry to add new manufacturing jobs in Ohio, Kentucky, South Carolina and Tennessee.For its part, the solar-installing industry warns that up to 23,000 jobs could be lost.The decision, will “create a crisis in a part of our economy that has been thriving, which will ultimately cost tens of thousands of hard-working blue-collar Americans their jobs,” said Abigail Ross Hopper, president and chief executive officer of the Solar Energy Industries Association, in a statement. Hopper expects the impact on solar investments to be billions of dollars.In 2016, there were 3,718 solar workers in Illinois and 260,077 in the U.S., according to the Washington, D.C.-based Solar Foundation. Solar industry employment has nearly tripled since the first National Solar Jobs Census was released in 2010.The impact on consumers buying washing machines could be short-term, and buyers may just get used to it.”It’s like any other product, if they want an LG machine, they’ll pay for it,” said Jon Abt, co-president of Abt Electronics, who said he expects consumers will see prices increase by about $50.Once Samsung’s $380 million manufacturing facility in Newberry, S.C., and LG’s $250 million plant in Clarksville, Tenn., are up and running, the impact will be lessened, Abt said. Samsung has said it has already hired 600 workers to staff the new facility.Chris Rogers, an analyst at New York-based research firm Panjiva agreed. Rogers’ analysis shows that Samsung, LG and other foreign producers have been aggressively importing washers in the past year, so it might be a while before consumers see prices go up because of stock on hand. “LG and Samsung have a cushion on the cheaper washing machines they can sell for the next few months,” he said.There’s no certainty that many jobs will be added if manufacturers turn to the U.S. to produce washing machines and solar cells, Panjiva’s Rogers said.After all, it’s not clear how foreign makers such as Samsung and LG will operate their U.S. plants, he said. They could make the parts in another country and then have them assembled here in the U.S. “If they mostly use oversees parts and assemble them using robots instead of people, the employment impact could be minimal,” he said. Explore further Solar industry on edge as Trump weighs tariffs on panels This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. ©2018 Chicago Tribune Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. At $1,899, one of the priciest washing machines for sale at Abt Electronics in Glenview, Ill., is Samsung’s two-washers-in-one-machine Steel FlexWash. As a result of new tariffs approved by President Donald Trump on Tuesday, that price tag is about to get steeper. read more