Foothill Family Receives 2017 Work-Life Seal of Distinction Award

first_img Make a comment 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Top of the News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Community News Foothill Family Receives 2017 Work-Life Seal of Distinction Award Foothill Family Recognized for Outstanding Commitment to Employee Engagement From STAFF REPORTS Published on Monday, April 3, 2017 | 11:32 am Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  More Cool Stuff HerbeautyWhat’s Your Zodiac Flower Sign?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyGained Back All The Weight You Lost?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 things only girls who live life to the maximum understandHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyVictoria’s Secret Model’s Tips For Looking Ultra SexyHerbeautyHerbeauty faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimescenter_img Community News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Community News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Subscribe Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Foothill Family has been recognized for its outstanding commitment to employee engagement and work-life balance by WorldatWork. The Work-Life Seal of Distinction is a mark of excellence designed to identify organizational success in promoting effective practices to support and maintain the health of its employees.As one of only 160 organizations and companies in North America to be recognized, Foothill Family is honored to be a 2017 recipient of this award for our second consecutive year,” said Steve Allen, Foothill Family chief executive officer. “We are proud to support the mental health of our communities by starting with the health and well-being of our employees, who are the on the front line of caring for children and families in need.”Begun in 2012, the prestigious Seal of Distinction is awarded to companies that meet defined standards of workplace programs, policies and practices weighted on several factors, such as the complexity of implementation, required organizational resources, perceived breadth of access and overall level of commitment from leadership. Applicants are evaluated on:• Health & wellness• Pay for time not worked• Unpaid time off• Retirement• Perquisites• Base pay• Bonus programs• Short-term incentives• Long-term incentives• Performance management• Recognition• Development opportunities• Caring for dependents• Culture initiatives & community involvement• Financial wellness• Workplace flexibility• Workforce experience“We congratulate all of the recipients of the 2017 Seal of Distinction. These recipients represent a wide variety of industries from across the U.S. and Canada, showing that the total rewards model applies to employers and employees everywhere,” stated Anne C. Ruddy, president and CEO of WorldatWork. “This year, we saw the highest number of applicants since the Seal of Distinction was created. I’m confident that this means an increasing number of companies are recognizing the importance of a workplace environment that benefits both the employer and employee.”This year’s recipients represent nonprofit organizations and for-profit companies in industries of education, finance, government, health, law, manufacturing, and pharmaceuticals, and hail from 36 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. Foothill Family is included in the ranks of awardees including Yale University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), UCLA Health and the David Geffen School of Medicine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, TD Ameritrade, KPMG LLP, Volvo Group North America, and the US Department of Agriculture.About Foothill FamilyFounded in 1926, Foothill Family provides a range of community-based mental health and social services to at-risk populations in the San Gabriel and Pomona Valleys, Glendale, and Burbank. Its mission, to build brighter futures for children and families, has helped Foothill Family earn a reputation as a leader in providing high-quality services aimed at empowering families and strengthening communities. Programs include mental health services, early child development, school-based behavioral health care, and youth and family services including child abuse prevention and treatment, domestic violence prevention and treatment, services for pregnant teens and their babies, family counseling, and youth development. Last year, more than 24,000 children and their families benefited from Foothill Family’s life-changing programs and outreach. For more information, please call (626) 993-3000 or visit the website at www.foothillfamily.org.About WorldatWorkThe Total Rewards AssociationWorldatWork is a nonprofit human resources association and compensation authority for professionals and organizations focused on compensation, benefits and total rewards. It’s our mission to empower professionals to become masters in their fields. We do so by providing thought leadership in total rewards disciplines from the world’s most respected experts; ensuring access to timely, relevant content; and fostering an active community of total rewards practitioners and leaders. https://www.worldatwork.org/WorldatWork has more than 70,000 members and subscribers worldwide; more than 80% of Fortune 500 companies employ a WorldatWork member. Founded in 1955, WorldatWork has offices in Scottsdale, Ariz., and Washington, D.C., and is affiliated with more than 70 human resources associations around the world. Business News First Heatwave Expected Next Week last_img read more

Natural pest control

first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity of GeorgiaInsects eat one-third of all food produced worldwide before it ever reaches the dinner table, according to University of Georgia expert Mike Adang. Since his undergraduate days at Indiana University, the entomology professor has been interested in ways to control insects besides using pesticides. Through his research at UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, he’s found a better, natural way to fight pests.Adang discovered BtBooster through a series of biopesticide experiments. By adding a bit of an insect protein to a small piece of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) protein, he learned that it “took less Bt to kill the insects.” In this case, the insects were hornworms, and originally, Adang expected the experiment to leave them ready and waiting to devour more plants. Instead, it left them dead.Bt is a biopesticide that produces proteins toxic to many insect species. “It’s a natural bacterium,” Adang said. “It attacks the insect’s gut, making the insect sick.”However, some insects are resistant to Bt. And that’s where Adang’s surprise comes into play. He and colleagues Gang Hua and John Chen had been hoping to learn how Bt kills insects by feeding them part of an insect protein, the Bt receptor. Instead, they found a way to supercharge Bt and kill the insects faster and with less biopesticide.And BtBooster was born.“We were very pleased to see something come from our basic research,” Adang said. “It’s a long way from the lab to making something useful.”Bt proteins have changed the way crop plants are protected against insects. The technology can be built into a plant like cotton or corn and has been available to farmers since 1996. Vegetables and trees can be protected from insect damage by being sprayed with a biopesticide made from Bt.Bt provides an alternative to chemical ways of dealing with pests, especially where chemicals could harm humans. Bt doesn’t hurt people. For that reason, foresters can spray whole stands of tree with Bt to fight gypsy moths, which are among North America’s most devastating forest pests.Organic farmers can use Bt and still be considered organic because biopesticides come from living organisms. They can control the insects on their crops without having to worry about chemical residues.Though Bt crops are becoming more common, chemicals are still a common way of controlling insects. “Chemical pesticides are still safe,” Adang said. “But over the years, people have started to worry more about problems such as groundwater contamination and other issues like that.”Through Bt, and now with BtBooster, the potential impact is great as more producers use crops that have been retrofitted with the Bt protein.“Using BtBooster will allow Bt crops and Bt biopesticides to work better,” Adang said, “having a positive environmental impact and reducing chemical insecticide use.”Through a National Institutes of Health grant, UGA and his gene design and discovery company InsectiGen, Adang is now studying how Bt kills mosquitoes. Using a U.S. Department of Agriculture National Research Initiative grant, he’s specifically looking at how insects become resistant to Bt in cotton. He’s digging deeper into the workings of BtBooster, too, trying to figure out how it works and making improvements to optimize it.Through UGA’s Georgia BioBusiness Center, Adang formed InsectiGen in 2003 with Clifton Baile, a CAES professor of animal science. Its focus is on discovering and engineering proteins for insect control.Because of his discovery of BtBooster, he was presented the UGA Inventor’s Award on March 29. He has also filed for a patent license to continue his quest of developing a farm-production product for pest control.last_img read more

Collision causes traffic congestion on Hobbs Drive

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisALPENA, Mich — Earlier yesterday afternoon an accident on Hobbs Drive caused traffic congestion in the area.At around noon a person pulling out of the Meijer parking lot failed to yield and hit an oncoming car.The at-fault driver was turning east on Hobbs and according to State Trooper Jason Kunath, the driver’s carelessness may be what caused the collision.Kunath also said only one of the cars were towed.While these drivers were lucky, Kunath wants to leave us with a reminder to drive cautiously.He also said both parties involved were checked out at the scene with minor injuries and a possible citation may be issued. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisContinue ReadingPrevious Governor Whitmer weighs in on the Michigan legislature’s Return to Learn planNext Pets of the Weeklast_img read more