Cleaning up the Braamfontein Spruit

first_imgResidents’ associations like the the Blairgowrie and Craighall Residents’ Association (senior members pictured above) were the driving force behind the successful clean-up projectIn an effort to clear the beautiful Braamfontein Spruit and its surrounding areas of unsightly litter and alien vegetation, a number of residents’ associations from the surrounding suburbs banded together with corporations like the Glass Recycling Company to make a clean and clear spruit a reality.The massive clean-up took place on Saturday 7 June along the banks of the Braamfontein Spruit with the Florence Bloom Bird Sanctuary at Delta Park serving as a central hub.The winter chill was not enough to deter the hundreds of people who made their way down to the spruit to participate in what was to become a fun day out for all.ORGANISING THE BRAAMFONTEIN SPRUIT CLEAN-UPWhen Natalie Zimmelman took over the environmental portfolio of the Parkhurst Residents and Business Owners Association in 2013 she decided it would be great to get the community to play a bigger part in keeping the spruit clean.What she pictured at first was a clean-up of a small section of the spruit; instead her efforts led to all the surrounding communities coming together to take responsibility for the cleanliness of their environment.“I thought, instead of just doing things for my community, wouldn’t it be fantastic if all the communities who are already active along the spruit came out on one day to create greater awareness,” Zimmelman explained.“From that we had participation from bodies like the Junior City Council, Miss Earth and Greenpeace and obviously we’ve got the youth out here through the scout clubs and the like.”News of her efforts attracted sponsors such as Imperial Green Motion, Penny Black and Chillibean Studios. Johannesburg City Parks and Zoo, Pikitup, ER 24, and schools and youth organisations also assisted with the clean-up.Steffani Alexander, a semi-finalist for Miss Earth South Africa, said the event gave her an opportunity to take an active role in cleaning up part of her community.She said, “For us, today was basically about acknowledging and building awareness about the environment as well as action. So as Miss Earth Ambassadors we’re actively getting involved and help moving towards a healthy and sustainable environment.”The Glass Recycling Company provided wheelie bins to collect all glass picked up during the clean-up.Kate Haupt, public relations officer for the Glass Recycling Company, said “When we heard about the Spruit Clean-up we thought that this would be a good opportunity for us to show our support and spread the word about the importance and benefits of recycling.”Zimmelman added, “I live in a very beautiful city, but I don’t want to live in concrete alone; if communities don’t step up and involve themselves, they can’t then complain about the state of their community; the municipality only has so much resources.“So for me it’s about creating a sense of our own community, our own village and our own city as well as sharing our responsibility and our part in it.“So I guess I’m an activist.”The spruit is essentially a tributary of the Limpopo River and has been subject to numerous developments near its banks, The clean-up has gone a long way towards tackling the problem of polution in the streamABOUT THE BRAAMFONTEIN SPRUITWith its origins deep within the inner city, the Braamfontein Spruit runs through a series of canals through town and along Empire Road before reaching the Frank Brown Park and emerging in the Parkview Golf Course.The Westdene Spruit, feeding into the Westdene and Emmerentia dams, merges with the Braamfontein Spruit before running through the suburbs of Parkhurst, Blairgowrie and Craighall Park and on towards Paulshof in the north of Johannesburg, where it is flanked by mountain bike trails and parks.The spruit is essentially a tributary of the Limpopo River and has been subject to development near its banks, which in turn has led to waste finding its way into the stream. This is both unsightly and a threat to the stream’s natural inhabitants. The clean-up has gone a long way towards tackling this problem.last_img read more

5K job for FortisTCI to repair pole damaged in car accident man

first_img Driver Slams into Power Pole in Leeward Highway Related Items:car accident, Devon Cox, pole fortis tci Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 27 Au 2015 – FortisTCI said it took a seven man team and ten hours to restore power after that Monday morning traffic accident on Leeward Highway. The 55ft power pole was severely damaged by the crash, which left the 55 year old driver in critical condition. Devon Cox, VP of Transmission and Distribution said that pole was holding a 35kv transmission top which powers Blue Hills and a 12.5kv distribution underbuilt feeder which takes care of Leeward Highway West. Only a gold Ford F-150 was involved in the serious accident which sent a Kew Town resident to hospital. The pole repair was put at $5,000. FortisTCI reminds motorists to drive carefully. Recommended for you 19 year old Beaches worker airlifted to Jamaica after serious accident Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp MINOR MISHAP A MERRY MIRACLElast_img read more

The Race for District 49 Candidate Review

first_img June 5th marks Election Day in California. Ed Lenderman was live with a few of the candidates for Congressional District 49 on Tuesday morning.Doug Applegate 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsPaul Kerr Ed Lenderman, Posted: June 5, 2018 The Race for District 49: Candidate Review 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsRocky Chavez 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSara Jacobs center_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsTo see the other candidates for District 49, click here. Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News Tags: Decision 2018 FacebookTwitter Ed Lenderman Updated: 2:55 PM June 5, 2018last_img read more

Researchers offer taphonomic degradation processes for mammalian hair

first_img Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B (Phys.org) —A team made up of researchers from the U.S. and Australia has put together what they describe as a complete outline of the taphonomic (post-mortem) degradation processes for mammalian hair. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, the group outlines the current state of post-mortem analysis of mammalian hair, including human and also offers some opinions on possible misinterpretations at both crime and archeology sites. Fungal invasion of hairs. (a) Woolly Mammoth (Jarkov) hair engulfed by hyphae, (b,c) partial removal of cuticle (arrow) and dissolution of cuticle (bracketed) on Q8 woolly mammoth (Jarkov) hair, (d) SEM image of a penetrating organ (arrow) embedded in a woolly rhino hair. (e) SEM image of a lateral fungal hypha with an eroding frond (arrow), ( f ) mycelial mass (arrow) on shaft of woolly mammoth (M10) hair. Scale bars: a ¼ 200 mm, b,c ¼ 100 mm, d ¼ 50 mm, e ¼ 5 mm, f ¼ 20 mm. Credit: Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Published 22 October 2014 doi: 10.1098/rspb.2014.1755 Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2014 Phys.orgcenter_img Citation: Researchers offer taphonomic degradation processes for mammalian hair (2014, October 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-10-taphonomic-degradation-mammalian-hair.html Caught by a hair The authors note that while the taphonomic degradation process for teeth and bones has been well documented, the same cannot be said for mammalian hair. Their paper serves to fill that void.The research team notes that on its own, mammalian hair doesn’t degrade much, allowing samples to survive for thousands of years. But most hair is not left to its own devices, it comes in contact with soil (quite often due to burial) that harbors fungi that do break down hair—they’ve provided photos of individual hairs with holes along their length to demonstrate what happens. That fungi breaks down hair is not new information—archeologists and law enforcement have both known about it for quite some time and have used the process to further their goal of trying to understand what happened at a particular site. But, the researchers contend, not all information gleaned from such sites is interpreted correctly. They note for example that if crime scene investigators find a hair that has experienced degradation due to fungi, it doesn’t necessarily mean that the victim died, was buried (putting them in contact with soil fungi) and then dug up again, as has been assumed in many such cases. Instead they note, soil fungi can degrade hair on living mammals, including people—if a child plays in the dirt for example. They suggest the only true evidence of death of a victim using a hair sample is what is known as post-mortem banding, where bacteria leave a dark band at the root of the hair when someone dies.The team also notes that examination of hair at crime scenes, particularly from victims that have been buried or left on the ground can offer less obvious clues, such as how long the hair has been exposed to the fungi or whether it existed in a warm humid climate, versus one that was cool or dry.The researchers also note that many examples of mammalian samples from archeological sites that suggest the original owner had red hair, such as those for many woolly mammoths, are inaccurate. Tests have shown that most such instances are due to contamination of the hair after death, from bacterial biofilms or other processes—woolly mammoth hair had no pigment, after all. More information: Interpreting biological degradative processes acting on mammalian hair in the living and the dead: which ones are taphonomic? Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Published 22 October 2014 DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2014.1755AbstractAlthough the taphonomic (post-mortem) degradation processes relevant to teeth and bones have been well described, those taking place with regards to mammalian hairs have not been characterized to the same extent. This present article describes, in detail, microscopic changes resulting from the actions of biological agents that digest and degrade hairs. The most noteworthy and prevalent agents responsible for the destruction of hair structure are fungi, which use a range of strategies to invade and digest hairs. One of the most important finds to emerge from this study is that taphonomic structures and processes can easily be interpreted by the unwary as ‘real’, or as class characteristics for a particular animal taxon. Moreover, under certain conditions, ‘taphonomic’ processes normally associated with the dead are also present on the hairs of the living. This work will improve the reliability of hair examinations in forensic, archaeological and palaeontological applications—in addition, the finding has relevance in the protection of mammalian collections susceptible to infestation. This article also addresses the popular myth that ancient peoples were often red-haired and discusses phenomena responsible for this observation. Insights gained from detailed characterization of taphonomic processes in 95 hairs from a variety of species demonstrate the range and breadth of degradative effects on hair structure and colour. Lastly, the study demonstrates that hairs often tell a story and that there is value of extracting as much morphological data as possible from hairs, prior to destructive sampling for biomolecules.last_img read more