Americans slain by captors on hijacked yacht; pirates killed, arrested

first_img Sharing is caring! Share Tweet Share 29 Views   no discussionscenter_img Share News Americans slain by captors on hijacked yacht; pirates killed, arrested by: – February 22, 2011 CNN News(CNN) — Four hostages on board a yacht hijacked by pirates last week were killed by their captors, U.S. Central Command said in a statement Tuesday.The vessel, named the Quest, was being shadowed by the military after being captured by pirates off the coast of Oman on Friday. Officials had said earlier Tuesday it was less than two days from the Somali coast.Americans Jean and Scott Adam — the owners of the ship — along with Phyllis Macay and Bob Riggle had been traveling with yachts participating in the Blue Water Rally since their departure from Phuket, Thailand, rally organizers said Sunday in a statement on the event’s website. The group, which organizes long-distance group cruises, said the Quest broke off on February 15 after leaving Mumbai, India, to take a different route.As negotiations were ongoing with the pirates for the hostages’ release, gunfire was heard at about 1 a.m. ET Tuesday, U.S. Central Command said. “As (U.S. forces) responded to the gunfire, reaching and boarding the Quest, the forces discovered all four hostages had been shot by their captors,” the statement said. “Despite immediate steps to provide life-saving care, all four hostages ultimately died of their wounds.”The pirates engaged the U.S. forces on board, officials said. Two pirates were killed in the skirmish and 13 were captured and detained. Two others were already in U.S. forces custody, the statement said, and the remains of two pirates were found on board. “In total, it is believed 19 pirates were involved in the hijacking” of the vessel, Central Command said.Forces had been monitoring the Quest for three days, officials said. Four U.S. Navy warships were involved in the response force — an aircraft carrier, a guided-missile cruiser and two guided-missile destroyers, according to the statement.A senior military official said on Monday the military was trailing the yacht. U.S. officials have not identified the people on board the ship, but confirmed that four U.S. citizens were involved.Another U.S. official, who asked not to be named due to the sensitivity of the situation, had said previously that the United States was determining what military assets were in the region and the capabilities of the personnel on board.The Adams were experienced boaters and started a world sailing tour in 2004, Scott Stolnitz, who said he was a longtime friend of the couple, said previously.They were very conscious of the threat posed by pirates, Stolnitz said, adding that Scott Adam had said weeks before that he was concerned about pirate activity in the area, a region he had never visited. But, he said, Adam was determined to sail the world himself rather than ship his boat, as some other yacht owners have done.The Adams’ website chronicles their worldwide voyage, which included trips to New Zealand, China, Cambodia and Panama.One aspect of their travels, according to the site, “is friendship evangelism — that is, finding homes for thousands of Bibles, which have been donated through grants and gifts, as we travel from place to place.” They also say their mission is to “allow the power of the Word to transform lives.”But, Stolnitz said, vigorous evangelism wasn’t a major emphasis for the couple. “They use the Bible as an ice breaker,” he said.Their travel plans for the Blue Water Rally included a refueling stop in Djibouti, according to the couple’s website. “Djibouti is a big refueling stop,” it said. “I have no idea what will happen in these ports, but perhaps we’ll do some local touring.”However, Stolnitz said the couple had expressed some unease in an e-mail sent several days before the hijacking.Piracy has flourished off the coast of Somalia, which has not had an effective government for two decades. In April 2009, pirates seized the U.S.-flagged Maersk Alabama, leading to a standoff in the Indian Ocean.U.S. forces moved to rescue American Capt. Richard Phillips after seeing a pirate aiming a weapon on his back, officials said at the time.Three pirates were killed and one was arrested. The Somali man arrested was convicted of acts related to high-seas piracy and was sentenced last week in New York to more than 30 years in prison by a federal court.CNN’s Mike Pearson contributed to this report.last_img read more

Carl Calendar: All’s Well That Ends Well

first_imgThis article was first published in the May 31-June 7, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times. “Dr. Calendar was an incredible teacher,” said Dara Evans, an associate professor and former student. “He was Virgil to my Dante.”Evans said she was not academically inclined and enrolled late at Brookdale because her parents insisted. Most classes were filled and by default she ended up in Calendar’s 9 a.m. Shakespeare’s Plays class.“He did not stop calling on me, the quiet girl in the back, and saw something in me I certainly didn’t see,” she explained.“My perception was I didn’t have to have the same answers as everyone else,” she said. “I could have confidence in my own voice. He has that gift.”Evans went from a job in sales and makeup to a career as a Brookdale literature professor. She still marvels at his technique.“He knew what Shakespeare’s characters ate for breakfast, what their favorite colors were and didn’t use notes in his lectures,” she said. “It’s an honor to have learned from him and I’m not the only one who will say that.”She’s right. Gilda Rogers was in her 30s when she decided to get a college degree.“Dr. Calendar had such a profound impact on my life,” she said, noting she still can’t call him by his first name. “He’s supportive of everything I’ve done. He’s my No. 1 cheerleader.”An English/journalism major, she’s now vice president of the T. Thomas Fortune Foundation, works in community relations at the Two River Theater Company and founded Frank Talk Multimedia Network online.“He’s authentic,” she said of Calendar. “Very loose, open and funny in class. He just speaks the truth and encourages you to be yourself. I never missed a class.”And she followed in his footsteps as a teacher, working for him in the Poseidon Early College High School program, a collaboration between Neptune High School and Brookdale to enable students to earn their high school diploma and associate’s degree simultaneously.Now that he’s retiring, Calendar’s calendar is an open slate.He knows he now wants to get back to visiting museums and attending lectures and the theater in New York City with his wife, Jody, a former managing editor of the Asbury Park Press and former executive editor of The Two River Times. They also have a five-month-old granddaughter to spoil.He wants to travel and do a lot of walking, both in New York City and Europe. He’s already walked 200 of the 500 miles of the Camino de Santiago and wants to finish the pilgrimage to the shrine of the apostle St. James the Great in the cathedral of Santiago de Compostela in northwestern Spain.He met his oldest friend, Steve Dummer, in college and they traveled Europe in 1963.“The dollar was strong and it was cheap to live in Europe then,” he said. “We went to Berlin, London, Paris. We were good at having fun.”Dummer, who lives in Tennessee, pursued a medical career and he, too, has taught and is retired.“Carl’s a good person, curious and gregarious, and we both have a lot of interest in books,” he said. “People who share a formative part of life often make lifelong friends and can pick up where they left off.”And Calendar wants to get Netflix “and some of those channels with the shows everyone is talking about,” he said.“I actually bought ‘Breaking Bad’ because I got so tired of people telling me about it,” he said. “I just never had time to watch much TV.” By Gretchen Van Benthuysen |On June 30, Brookdale Community College visitors may get the feeling that time is out of joint on the Lincroft campus.center_img And they’d be right, because it’s the day popular professor and administrator Carl Calendar officially retires from the school that was founded in 1968, admitted its first students in 1969 and hired Calendar in 1970.That event must have been similar, in spirit, to the 1995 film “Mr. Holland’s Opus” in which Richard Dreyfuss takes a high school teaching job until he breaks into the music composing business and instead spends his career changing students’ lives.Just like Mr. Holland, Calendar became teacher because he needed a paying job.He studied English and German, traveled Europe for a year, and earned a doctorate in comparative literature at the University of Oregon.“I’d been in school until I was 25 and I thought I ought to do some work” he explained. “So I got a job at Brookdale thinking I’d stay a year. And I stayed 48.”It was in his blood. When Calendar was growing up in Middlesex County, his father taught at Rutgers University and his mother was a high school math teacher. His older brother went into the “family business” as a molecular biologist teaching at University of California-Berkley.“Most of the family was into science and math,” he said. “I’m the only one in the arts. I was just good at writing and literature.”Calendar reaches for a calculator when asked how many students he’s taught, which include journalist Brian Williams and movie director/actor/comic Kevin Smith.“I’d say between 9,000 and 10,000 students, definitely over 10,000 if you include the non-credit courses,” Calendar said during a recent interview in his office in Larrison Hall.The first 30 years he primarily taught and the next 18 years he took on more administrative duties. His current title: Institute Dean-Humanities.In April, dozens of former students, colleagues and other well-wishers, including one of the nine students in the school’s first graduating class, attended Calendar’s retirement party.last_img read more

Half-time: Fulham 1 Huddersfield 0

first_imgHugo Rodallega’s sixth goal of the season put Fulham ahead at half-time as they looked to extend their unbeaten league run. Aside from an early George Williams shot which was saved, the Whites were largely pinned back in their own half by Huddersfield, who twice came close to taking the lead in the first 20 minutes.Fortunately for Fulham, Elsad Zverotic was in the right place to clear Mark Hudson’s header off the line and then Harry Bunn somehow contrived to roll a shot past the post when he only had keeper Marcus Bettinelli to beat.When Huddersfield shot themselves in the foot again, this time at the other end, Fulham were quick to pounce. Hudson, who began his career at Fulham as a youngster, miscontrolled just inside his own half, Rodallega nipped in and after receiving a return pass from Ross McCormack, slotted past the goalkeeper.It wasn’t to spark a spell of Fulham pressure, however. Instead, Huddersfield continued to probe without ever finding the killer pass to expose an anxious-looking Whites defence.And Fulham had two good chances to score a second. George Williams fired into the side netting from an angle and in first half injury time, Rodallega wastefully nodded over from Lasse Christensen’s cross.Kit Symons made two changes from the side which drew with Blackpool in midweek, McCormack returning after suspension, replacing Moussa Dembele, and Kostas Stafylidis replacing the injured Fernando Amorebieta at left-back.Fulham (4-1-2-1-2): Bettinelli; Zverotic, Bodurov, Burn, Stafylidis; Parker; Christensen, Williams; Ruiz; Rodallega, McCormack.Subs: Kiraly, Hutchinson, Eisfeld, Roberts, Woodrow, Dembele, Hyndman.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Scientific Supporters of ES Stem Cell Research Fear Future Abuses

first_img“How would you know if a human brain was trapped in a mouse’s body?”  This frightful and intriguing question opened an article in Nature this week.1  More on that in a minute.    Last week, in the Oct. 14 issue,2 a Nature editorial on California’s Stem Cell Proposition 71 stated that “the proposal is less of an unalloyed blessing than it seems.”  Though most professional scientists are eager for funds to test embryonic stem cells, Nature feared that the proposition goes overboard.  It amends the state constitution, threatens a state economy that is near insolvency, and promises it will pay for itself, “But it is not clear that these analyses hold water.”  Worst of all, it prevents oversight by the state legislature, expecting the researchers to police themselves.  Surprisingly, Nature supports government oversight of scientific funding.  The NIH and NSF at the federal level, which operate under the scrutiny of Congress, perform a healthy role: “At these agencies, scientific merit is judged almost entirely by the community itself, but Congress ultimately ensures that the public good is paramount.”  No such policing comes with Prop. 71, however, and the money trail looks too tempting:Proposition 71, in contrast, would introduce a new model for the support of scientific research at the state level that would rely on mere transparency as a guarantee against abuse.  Although public meetings are promised, the oversight committee would consist mainly of people with close ties to the universities, institutes and companies that stand to benefit from the money spent.  Most of the rest are representatives of disease groups.  The committee makes the ultimate funding decisions and will be allowed to modify NIH rules of informed consent and human-subject protection as it sees fit.    The advocacy of such people as the actor Christopher Reeve – whose untimely death this week deprives biomedical research of one of its most forceful and effective lobbyists – has helped to elevate the promise of embryonic-stem-cell research, sometimes to unrealistic levels.  It is up to the people of California whether they want to approve Proposition 71.  But if they do, researchers must strive to ensure that no funds will be abused, and they must give full consideration to a wide array of ethical concerns.  Anything less risks damaging public trust in science.Yet how effective can self-policing by researchers be, when the temptations for grant money, prizes and lucrative pharmaceutical contracts threaten to make ethics take a back seat?  This was the subject of the editorials this week in Nature1 and Science3 about feeble first attempts in Washington to decide what is right or wrong.  The lack of clear guidelines on stem cell research occasioned the question about human brain cells in mice: how would anyone know?  If the researcher feels he has to experiment with chimeras (see BreakPoint commentary) to find a cure, on what basis will the scientific community claim it is unethical, and how could they stop it?    Erika Check wrote about prominent biologists debating such questions just in the last few days at the US National Academies, now that California’s Prop. 71 is already on the ballot and appears poised for an easy win, especially since the state’s popular governor, Arnold Schwarzenegger, has endorsed it along with Michael J. Fox and other celebrities.  Since no clear guidelines exist, and no federal policies have the force of law, the scientists have a free rein to create their own consensus about what is ethical.  The vacuum has allowed some already to charge ahead into areas that are blurring the line between human and animal:Researchers at the meeting agreed on a lot: that the use of human embryonic stem cells to produce a baby should be banned, for example, and that stem-cell researchers should adopt guidelines to reassure the public that their work is ethically sound.  But they differed on how to handle chimaeras, which mix cells and DNA from different species….    Scientists could even construct a mouse whose entire brain was made of human-derived cells….The article quotes Irving Weissman of Stanford who is already creating human-mouse chimeras with private funds.  Weissman claims the “yuck factor” is no reason to ban such research.  The fact that the government so far has not taken the lead in establishing guidelines puts the burden on the scientists themselves, but is this the fox guarding the henhouse?  “That leaves a hole for scientists, who are not sure what the law permits them to do, and lack guidance on their work’s impact on public opinion.”  How, then, can they “reassure the public that their work is ethically sound?”    Speaking for Science,3 Constance Holden provided more details on the meeting of scientists last week in Washington, DC.  The scientists seemed to agree on little more than the need for guidelines.  They admitted that there is no clear distinction between “stem cell research” and “cloning” even among biotech investors, though the public is usually reassured that cloning is bad.  And they could not answer such basic questions as, “what does it mean to accord an early embryo ‘respect’?”  It didn’t help to hear a legal expert confide, “much assisted reproduction is human experimentation in the name of treatment.”  The potential for deceiving a gullible public appears more powerful than ethical concerns, especially from the so-called religious right (see 09/27/2004 headline). EurekAlert reported that the UN is also considering talks about the ethics of therapeutic cloning, as ES stem cell research is called.  Dr. Gerald Schatten (U. of Pittsburgh) argues research first, ethics later as he admits that ES stem cells have no track record: “Will therapeutic cloning create immune matching?  It’s unclear.  At this point, we don’t even know if human embryonic stem cells are safe, let alone effective.  What’s important is that research be allowed to continue so we can find out.”    The bottom line: the race toward this potentially lucrative technology by states and other countries seems to be outpacing concerns about ethics, even though there is no evidence ES stem cells will cure anything (while adult stem cells already have plenty).  Now that they are on the verge of getting their way, the scientists are having one last twinge of conscience before charging full steam ahead.1Erica Check, “Biologists seek consensus on guidelines for stem-cell research,” Nature 431, 885 (21 October 2004); doi:10.1038/431885a.2Editorials: “California dreaming,” Nature 431, 723 (14 October 2004); doi:10.1038/431723a3Constance Holden, “Bioethics: Stem Cell Researchers Mull Ideas for Self-Regulation,” Science, Vol 306, Issue 5696, 586, 22 October 2004, [DOI: 10.1126/science.306.5696.586].If anyone should have a voice in the ethics of stem cell research, it should be Joni Eareckson Tada, the advocate for the disabled who has spent the last 37 years in a wheelchair herself.  She has done far more than the TV celebrities to help the afflicted.  Her organization “Joni and Friends” has supplied over 25,000 wheelchairs to the disabled poor in Africa and other third world countries.  Moreover, she could certainly be expected to look with hope over any therapies that might allow her to walk again.  Yet she remains a staunch opponent of embryonic stem cell research, for good reasons, as explained on the bioethics page of her website JoniAndFrends.org.    Joni has appeared on radio talk shows and TV interviews, such as in a debate last week on Faith Under Fire.  The clarity of her logic is unimpeachable.  Yet it is unlikely that she can overcome the tear-jerking, emotional commercials by celebrity actors that tug at the heartstrings with empty promises that embryonic stem cells might cure your grandmother of Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease, despite no track record and many problems (while adult stem cells are flourishing: for another example, see EurekAlert report this week about skin cells fighting brain tumors).  Meanwhile, beneficiaries of Prop. 71 stand to make a killing on taxpayer funds.  Follow the money trail: why don’t private investors support ES stem cell research?  Yet the taxpayers are going to have to foot the bill for a possible boondoggle that may take decades to show any results– maybe never, while a class of human beings will be created to be destroyed for scientific research (a good time to re-read John Durkin’s letter; see 09/03/2004 headline).  Since California voters never seem to find a bond issue they didn’t like, even when living in a state climbing out of near bankruptcy, the world is staged to see the next chapter in our brave new world opening on November 2.  Maybe the scientists will figure out how to be “ethical” while they’re laughing on the way to the bank.(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Weare wins Quiksilver Pro Durban

first_img21 April 2008An inspired performance by local man Davey Weare saw him surf to victory against the USA’s Austin Ware in excellent surf at Ansteys on the Bluff near Durban to capture the Quiksilver Pro Durban title.Utilising their prime-status alternative venue, the contest organisers had little hesitation in choosing Ansteys for the final day of surfing. “Ansteys was always on the radar,” said contest director Matt Wilson, of the venue choice for the day.Explosive match-ups“There’s not much happening at New Pier, or anywhere else on the coast, and we’re seeing some great waves here. The surfers are happy, so it was the right decision to make.” A day of great surfing, big moves and barrel rides ensued, with some explosive match-ups the order of the day.Josh Kerr from Australia was in the first heat of the day against fellow Australian Shaun Cansdell, and won it convincingly with big turns and some trade-mark airs.“This is a great wave and I’m stoked we moved here,” said Kerr of the new location. “These waves have plenty of push and there are opportunities for big scores, so it definitely was a good idea to move the event. I got lucky in that heat by catching the good ones, but a win’s a win, so I’ll take it.”Red-hot heatWeare, the last of the South Africans left in the contest, then surfed a red-hot heat against German surfer Marlon Lipke, with the Durban star sneaking into some tight barrels and off-the-top combinations to keep local hopes alive. One wave in particular looked like a perfect barrel, but Weare was clipped while exiting the tube.Still, he had done enough to win the heat. “My first wave was a great one, with a little barrel and a nice hook,” he said. “I thought that I was going to make that second barrel, and if I had it would have taken some of the pressure off the heat, but it still worked out alright for me.”The quarter-finals took to the water at low tide, and there were some hollow sections and a few little barrels coming through for the last eight surfers.VictorsEmerging victorious from their encounters were Josh Kerr who defeated Austin Ware; Jihad Khodr, who defeated Heitor Alves; David Weare, who eliminated Dustin Barca; and Portuguese surfer Tiago Pires who took out Leigh Sedley from Australia.“Well, the waves are fine here at Ansteys. We got a few good ones in that heat,” said Tiago afterwards. “I much prefer the waves at New Pier, but there’s nothing there today, so we’re lucky with these waves.”In the first semi-final Ware eliminated Kodre from the event, after the Brazilian’s best wave scored a zero. Ware had priority at the time, and was up and riding on the inside when Jihad took off.“I went for that wave as I needed an early start. I didn’t even see what Jihad was doing,” said Ware of the incident. “Still, I’m stoked to get so far. This is my first six-star final, so I am absolutely pumped!”Semi-finalIn the second semi-final, Weare turned up the heat against Pires and turned in an inspired performance in front of his home crowd. He linked his scoring waves all the way through to the shorebreak, with some good combinations of moves and impressive laybacks.“I was so stoked to hear the crowds cheering me after every wave,” said Weare. “I’ve got my wife and my daughter and family here, my dad, and all my best friends. It’s unreal to hear their support.”The Quiksilver Pro Junior hit the water just prior to the main final, and tightly contested final unfolded between Klee Strachan and Nick Godfrey.Near the end of the heat, it was Godfrey in the lead, and with priority when he gave a wave to Strachan, who maximised the opportunity, pulled off a big turn on the outside, and weaved his way all the way through to the shorebreak for a massive hit, a big score and the Pro Junior title.FinalThe tide had moved in for the final of the main event between Weare and Ware, but the waves were still pumping.Weare’s first scoring wave consisted of a clean tube ride and a big close-out move, and matters only got better for the local ace as he delivered his best heat of competition in the final.After his first good ride, he followed up with two more big scores that showed off his repertoire of futuristic airs and big turns, leaving Ware needing a nine-plus score to get into the lead.The American was gracious in defeat, praising Weare on his performance as a beaming Weare emerged from the water as the Quiksilver Pro Durban 2008 Champion.‘So incredibly happy’“So incredibly happy right now,” said Weare just seconds before he was hoisted up on the shoulders of friends and carried up the beach.“I had a good start, and during the event whenever I had a good start I seemed to do well. I’m a bit overwhelmed right now. I can’t remember all that went on in the heat. The support really did help, so thanks to all those people who were cheering me on from the beach.”Weare pocketed $15 000 for his victory, as well as 3 000 World Qualifying Series points, which will go a long way towards helping him achieve his goal of qualifying the 2009 World Championship Tour.SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publicationor on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Bitspace Launches HTML5-Based Streaming Music Player and Backup Service

first_imgThere is no dearth of streaming music services on the web today, so it takes quite a bit for a new service to stand out from other popular services like Spotify, MOG and Lala. Today, we came across Bitspace, an online music player and backup service for your music files that puts an interesting new spin on this subject. This service stands out because of its great design and the fact that it’s fully based on HTML5. HTML5 OnlyGiven its reliance on HTML5, Bitspace currently only works with Webkit-based browsers like Apple’s Safari and Google’s Chrome (Internet Explorer users can, of course, use Google’s Chrome Frame plugin). Firefox’s implementation of the HTML5 audio tag currently only works with Ogg Vorbis files and does not support playing MP3 files yet. 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… Paid Accounts (No Free Accounts for Now)Bitspace currently offers three different types of paid accounts: basic (limited to 10GB, or the equivalent of 200 albums and 2,000 tracks for €3.99/month), standard (limited to 25GB for €3.99/month) and premium (limited to 50GB for €14.99/month). Sadly, the free accounts (with a limit of 500 MB) are currently invite-only and you will have to sign up for the service and whip out your credit card (though with a free 30 day trial) if you want to test Bitspace. 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App Uploading and Playing Your MusicUploading files to Bitspace is fairly straightforward. You can either pick and choose files through the service’s web interface, or, if you are a Mac user, you can also use the company’s OSX client. Bitspace uses Amazon’s storage services for saving your files. The service can import and play most common audio file formats, including MP3, MP4, OGG, WMA and FLAC. What’s currently missing, however, is an easy way to upload larger batches of files. While you can upload multiple MP3 files simultaneously, you can’t pick multiple directories, which slows the upload process down quite a bit.The central focus of Bitspace is obviously the music player. Here, you can organize your tracks by artist, album name, label and year. In addition, you can also manage your playlists here. The minimalist design of the app is one of the highlights of the service The design puts a lot of emphasis on album artwork and makes very good use of HTML5 and the new features it affords developers. Bitspace also integrates with Last.fm and allows you to sync your scrobbles from Bitspace. Update: we originally reported that Bitspace limited users to a certain number of tracks and albums. This is not the case. Bitspace only enforces the limit on disk space.VerdictOther services, including Lala, also offer similar streaming music services that allow you to upload your music to the cloud. Lala’s big advantage over Bitspace is that it’s offering its service for free and doesn’t cap its users’ uploads. Given that Lala has been acquired by Apple, though, the service’s future remains unclear. Compared to Lala, Bitspace is definitely the prettier service and it’s reliance on open web-standards is commendable. Even though the service offers a 30-day trial, the fact that you do have to enter your credit card information or PayPal credentials when signing up will surely keep quite a few potential users from giving it a try (though the prices for the paid accounts are quite fair).It’s important to remember that these are still the early days for Bitspace and the company’s co-founder Niklas Holmgren tells us that Bitspace is also working on mobile apps and integrating more social networks into the service. Related Posts 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout Tags:#music#news#storage#web frederic lardinois 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People…last_img read more

How to Fail as a Leader

first_imgYesterday, I had the great and terrible privilege of watching a leader fail.Failure to Communicate: The leader did not communicate with his team. He left them to their own devices. The team did not communicate with each other. The lack of communication caused them to make mistakes, and the mistakes caused them to fail. The leader said nothing.Failure to Believe Success Is Attainable: As the team’s performance worsened, their leader made visible his belief that the team was incapable of success. His failure to believe was immediately and irrevocably adopted by his team. He didn’t believe, so they didn’t believe either. He infected them with the belief that they could only lose, and that became their reality.Failure to Inspire and Motivate: The leader said nothing to inspire the team. He said nothing to instill confidence in his team. When they needed his encouragement, he withheld it, instead showing his lack of interest–and sometimes his contempt–for his team. He made no effort to help them turn things around.Failure to Demand Success: This leader failed to demand that his team give their all, that they do their very best. The leader literally allowed his team to fail. They may have failed anyway, but he should have made clear that he was going to demand more of them, that he wasn’t going to allow them to lose. He let them give up on themselves when he should have demanded they perform.The team failed themselves, too.No One Stepped Up to Lead: Not one member of the team stepped up to take over the role of leader when they lost theirs. They were too young and too inexperienced to know that no one makes you a leader; you step up and take responsibility.One person can make a difference. Leadership is the difference between winning and losing, between success and failure.QuestionsWhy is it important that a leader communicate with her team?How does a leader show her team that she believes in them?How does she inspire and motivate her team?Can you demand success?What is your responsibility when you have no leader?last_img read more

Bantamweight champ Reymart Gaballo demolishes Japanese foe for 2nd round KO

first_imgMOST READ Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes View comments Buoyed by the raucous home crowd, Gaballo had bad intentions from the get-go, unleashing combinations that had Nakamura on his heels.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparc ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants Read Next Private companies step in to help SEA Games hostingcenter_img Rising bantamweight Reymart Gaballo. Photo by Mark Giongco/INQUIRER.netMANILA, Philippines—Rising bantamweight Reymart Gaballo had high praise for his Japanese opponent Yuya Nakamura ahead of their 10-round fight.Gaballo predicted his bout with Nakamura would go the distance.ADVERTISEMENT SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte But it wasn’t even close.The General Santos City native was too much for Nakamura with Gaballo needing only two rounds of light work to remain unblemished at 21-0, 18 of which by KO in the main event of ESPN5’s fight card Saturday night at Midas Hotel and Casino.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesThe 22-year-old Gaballo, the WBA interim bantamweight champion, knocked down Nakamura thrice, twice in the first round with an array of punches and the last in the second round in front of the Japanese corner.Gaballo was just stronger and quicker as he outclassed Nakamura, who had little to show. Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss LATEST STORIES Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town US-based Romero Duno impresses in front of hometown crowd for WBA Asia lightweight title Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

Jiu-jitsu ace Annie Ramirez clinches gold in emotional win at Abu Dhabi World Pro

first_imgPhilippine Arena Interchange inaugurated FILE – Annie Ramirez during the Asian Indoor and Martial Arts Games 2017 in Ashgabat, Turkmenistan. Photo by June Navarro/INQUIRERMANILA, Philippines—Filipino martial artist Annie Ramirez fought off the United States’ Sophia Dalpra, 5-4, to clinch the gold medal in the Abu Dhabi World Professional Jiu-Jitsu Championship Wednesday at Mubadala Arena.It was an emotional win for Ramirez, who nabbed her first gold in the competition after a tense final as the 28-year-old had to wait for the referee’s verdict after the 4-4 deadlock in the female purple belt 55-kilogram title match.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles Ramirez wasn’t a newcomer to the competition after competing in the World Pro, the more popular term for the tiff, twice in the blue belt division and once in the purple division in 2018.The victory was also of precious timing for Ramirez with the Philippines hosting the 2019 Southeast Asian Games from late November to early December.“I didn’t give up on my goal of winning the gold in the World Pro,” said Ramirez. “It also comes in a time when the Philippines will host the SEA Games in December.”Ramirez is also a judo black belt but switched to jiu-jitsu in 2013 and went on a medal haul ever since.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess LATEST STORIES DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power grid Rockets close out Jazz in 5, advance to 2nd round “This is my first gold in four years in the World Pro and it means a lot to me and my country,” said Ramirez, as per The National. “I got emotional because I have never won a gold on a world stage.”“It was a close fight and with the points tied, it was a long and anxious wait before I was declared the winner,” added Ramirez in The National’s report.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logistics Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting MOST READ Although she hadn’t won any international hardware as a judoka, Ramirez tallied gold medals in the Asian Beach Games in Thailand and Vietnam in 2014 and 2016, respectively.“It took me around two years to get adjusted to jiu-jitsu but I’m glad I made the switch.” Read Next Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles03:12Trump: IS group leader killed in US raid in Syria00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss SEA Games hosting troubles anger Dutertelast_img read more

9 months agoSevilla coach Machin: Munir wants to be in the front line

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Sevilla coach Machin: Munir wants to be in the front lineby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveSevilla coach Pablo Machin has welcomed their deal for former Barcelona striker Munir El Haddadi.Sevilla swooped for Munir last week.Machin said, “He will bring above all competitiveness. He is a good recruit. Not only for the present, but also for the future. “Many clubs wanted him too and he chose Sevilla FC. He does not want to be in the background, but in the front line. Sevilla is an ideal club for him. “We will try to lead him to his best level.” last_img