FIFA’s Infantino proposed as IOC member, but not Coe – Bach

first_imgBy Karolos GrohmannLAUSANNE, Switzerland (Reuters) – FIFA president Gianni Infantino has been proposed for International Olympic Committee (IOC) membership, but World Athletics head Sebastian Coe will have to wait due to a conflict of interest, IOC president Thomas Bach said yesterday.Olympics has been without membership ever since the departure from the IOC of its respective former presidents Sepp Blatter and Lamine Diack in 2015.For years, membership of the IOC for the heads of soccer and athletics was seen as almost automatic.Yet the two international federations have been left out in the cold as they struggled with widespread corruption and doping scandals which tarnished their images. Diack, who has denied wrongdoing, faces a corruption trial in France in January. Bach said Infantino had been proposed for election at its next session in January along with International Tennis Federation chief David Haggerty and Japanese Olympic Committee president Yasuhiro Yamashita.World Athletics chief Coe, however, had not been proposed due to a conflict of interest. “We wanted him (Coe) to become an IOC member as president of one of our most important Olympic sports,” Bach said. “Since then we are in close consultation with him and since then we have addressed the risk of a potential of conflict of interest he may have.”Apart for his role at World Athletics, Coe is also Group Chairman of consultancy firm CSM which also works with the IOC. “CSM is consulting various organisations and stakeholders including having contractual partnerships with the IOC itself.”Bach said Coe had informed them that he could not immediately resolve this situation but was working on it. Bach said Coe could become a member at its session during the Tokyo 2020 Olympics. “He is hopeful to address it in a couple of months. Then that would mean the door is still open for Tokyo.” The IOC elects new members at its sessions once candidates are vetted by the Olympic body.last_img read more

County Board expect Qualifer to stay at Semple

first_imgThe Tipperary County Board say there won’t be any change of venue for the round 2 All Ireland qualifiers this Saturday.Tipp are due to play Dublin at Semple Stadium on Saturday as part of a double header with the match between Kilkenny and Waterford.It’s understood the Dublin county board are unhappy they’ll have to face the Premier in Thurles and have asked the Central Competition Control Committee to review the decision, which they say is an insult to Dublin hurling. Tipp County Secretary Tim Floyd says Semple is effectively a neutral venue in the eyes of the GAA and the only other possibility was Croke Park which is unavailable this weekend.last_img

Ty Buttrey has another rough eighth to cost Angels in 3rd straight loss to Orioles

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error PreviousLos Angeles Angels starting pitcher Dillon Peters throws to the plate during the first inning of a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles, Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Baltimore Orioles’ Stevie Wilkerson, right, is tagged out at third by Los Angeles Angels third baseman Matt Thaiss while trying to stretch a double into a triple during the sixth inning of a baseball game Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols, right, gestures as he scores after hitting a solo home run while Baltimore Orioles catcher Pedro Severino kneels at the plate during the sixth inning of a baseball game Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsBaltimore Orioles’ Jonathan, Villar second from right, gestures as he scores after hitting a solo home run as Los Angeles Angels catcher Kevan Smith, left, stands at the plate during the sixth inning of a baseball game Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani, of Japan, runs to first as he hits a solo home run during the third inning of a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles, Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Baltimore Orioles’ Pedro Severino, right, celebrates with Renato Nunez, left, and Hanser Alberto after hitting a two-run home run during the third inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels, Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols bats during the third inning of a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles, Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Baltimore Orioles right fielder Trey Mancini makes a catch on a ball hit by Los Angeles Angels’ Kole Calhoun during the third inning of a baseball game Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani, of Japan, rounds second after hitting a solo home run during the third inning of a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Luis Rengifo, left, watches a child runs off the field after giving an autograph to him prior to a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles, Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols (5) talks to a child after giving an autograph to him prior to a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles, Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout walks over to give autographs prior to a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles, Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout stretches as a fan holds up a sign for him prior to a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles, Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani, of Japan, warms up in the on-deck circle during the first inning of a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles, Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels first baseman Albert Pujols gets himself set during the first inning of a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles, Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout, left, is congratulated by Shohei Ohtani, of Japan, after hitting a two-run home run during the first inning of a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles, Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani, of Japan, hits a foul ball during the first inning of a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles, Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout is congratulated by teammates in the dugout after hitting a two-run home run during the first inning of a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles, Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Baltimore Orioles starting pitcher Aaron Brooks throws to the plate during the first inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout runs to first as he hits a two-run home run during the first inning of a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Baltimore Orioles’ Renato Nunez, center, scores on a single by Pedro Severino as Los Angeles Angels catcher Kevan Smith, right, waits for the ball and home plate umpire Cory Blaser. left, watches during the first inning of a baseball game Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Dillon Peters throws to the plate during the first inning of a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles, Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Baltimore Orioles’ Stevie Wilkerson, right, is tagged out at third by Los Angeles Angels third baseman Matt Thaiss while trying to stretch a double into a triple during the sixth inning of a baseball game Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)NextShow Caption1 of 21Baltimore Orioles’ Stevie Wilkerson, right, is tagged out at third by Los Angeles Angels third baseman Matt Thaiss while trying to stretch a double into a triple during the sixth inning of a baseball game Saturday, July 27, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)ExpandANAHEIM — Ty Buttrey, who had been the Angels best reliever for most of the season, is having a tough month.Buttrey gave up the tie-breaking runs in the eighth inning of the Angels’ 8-7 loss to the Baltimore Orioles on Saturday night.The Angels scored a run in the ninth and had Mike Trout up with one out and the tying run at third. Trout struck out, and then Justin Upton hit a popup with the bases loaded to end it.After bringing a four-game winning streak into this series against the Orioles, who have the second worst record in the majors, the Angels now need to win on Sunday to avoid a four-game sweep. On Thursday night, Buttrey entered just after the Angels had taken a 4-2 lead in the eighth, and he gave up three runs.“They seem to have good looks at him,” Manager Brad Ausmus said. “You don’t see a lot of bad swings in the two outings he’s had against them. They seem to get a good look at the ball for whatever reason.”Ausmus said he’s not worried about Buttrey in the bigger picture, despite him having a few bad outings this month.“The stuff looks the same,” Ausmus said. “Most players, pitchers and hitters will have an occasional bad month or not an up-to-par month. I’m not concerned.”Ausmus conceded that they would have “to consider” whether fatigue is an issue, but the quality of his stuff suggests that’s not the issue. Buttrey also said he feels fine.“I just absolutely (stunk) today,” Buttrey said. “It can’t happen again.”Even after his trouble in the eighth, the Angels still had a shot to win it, or at least tie it, in the bottom of the ninth.With one out and an 8-6 deficit, Matt Thaiss drew a walk against Mychal Givens. Luís Rengifo then hit a grounder to second baseman Alberto. With a shift on, no one was covering second so Alberto tried to tag Thaiss going by, and he missed him.David Fletcher singled — his career-best fourth hit of the game — to drive in Thaiss and send Rengifo to third. Givens then struck out Trout as Fletcher stole second. The Orioles intentionally walked Shohei Ohtani to load the bases for Upton, who popped out.That they had a chance to win was a testament to the offense, because starter Dillon Peters allowed five runs in four innings. He had pitched five scoreless innings in his last outing, against the Seattle Mariners on Sunday.“Just a couple pitches that should’ve been executed that got in the hitter’s zone,” Peters said. “They capitalized on me missing on pitches that I can execute.”He was spared a loss because the Angels were also having a productive night against Baltimore right-hander Aaron Brooks.They had a pair of runs quickly, when Fletcher led off the first with a double and then Trout dropped a homer just over the short fence down the left field line. It was Trout’s 12th homer in the past 17 games, and 34th of the season.In the second inning, Fletcher pulled a two-run double down the left field line. Ohtani belted a homer to straightaway center in the third, his first homer since the All-Star break.The teams traded homers opposite-field homers in the sixth, with Villar and Albert Pujols each dropping fly balls just over the fence down the right-field line.Trevor Cahill gave up only the Villar homer in three innings of work. After failing to be productive as a starter, Cahill has a 3.86 ERA since the Angels moved him to the bullpen a month ago.center_img Buttrey had a hand in the series-opening loss on Thursday, too, coughing up a two-run lead in the eighth inning of a game the Angels would lose in 16 innings.In Buttrey’s last eight games, he’s allowed seven earned runs and 13 hits in eight innings. He did not have a strikeout in either of the last two, marking the first time this season he’d done that in back-to-back games.His average fastball was 96.8 mph on Saturday, right where he’d been all season. He got just one swing and miss on 12 fastballs, though. For the season, hitters had been whiffing at 27 percent of his fastballs.“There’s things I know I need to do,” Buttrey said. “It’s a feeling; it’s a rhythm, and I gotta get back to that, and right now that’s not happening. And that’s why I (stunk) today.”Buttrey entered in a 6-6 tie in the eighth and he gave up a single to Jonathan Villar. Stevie Wilkerson then fouled off seven pitches before Buttrey hit him. After both runners moved up on a comebacker, Hanser Alberto poked a single up the middle to put the Orioles on top.last_img read more

Depressed? Believe in a Caring God

first_img“Belief in a Caring God Improves Response to Medical Treatment for Depression, Study Finds.”  That’s what Science Daily said.  The statement assumes, of course, that psychiatry knows what depression is.  Another story on Science Daily worried that “Psychiatry’s Main Method to Prevent Mistaken Diagnoses of Depression Doesn’t Work.”    It makes sense that diagnosis must precede treatment.  The psychiatry industry’s manual, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders or DSM (see 02/17/2010) contains the criteria for diagnosing depression.  A patient needs 5 of 9 listed symptoms to be diagnosed.  “However, these symptoms can also occur in normal responses to loss and stress.”  Because of false positives resulting from the old DSM criteria, the new DSM-IV tried to correct them with a Clinical Significance Criterion (CSC), in order to reduce over-diagnosis (some studies suggested that 33% of the population suffer from depression).  A new study, though shows that the CSC does not reduce false positives.    Even if the dividing line between clinical depression and normal distress or sadness is fuzzy, there is no question that many people are afflicted with grief, sadness, and feelings of despair that can be debilitating.  A study of 136 adults at Rush University Medical Center tried to quantify the effect of belief in a caring God on medical treatment for depression.  Science Daily said the doctors used “the Beck Depression Inventory, the Beck Hopelessness Scale, and the Religious Well-Being Scale” to assess the depth and intensity of depression, and “feelings of hopelessness and spiritual satisfaction.”  According to the article, “the study found that those with strong beliefs in a personal and concerned God were more likely to experience an improvement.”  Therefore, “clinicians need to be aware of the role of religion in their patients’ lives.”Articles like this might encourage some readers, but it is questionable whether “scientific” assessments by secularists can state anything meaningful on questions of this sort.  If they can’t even decide what depression is, how are they going to measure the “religious well being” of a patient who claims he or she is depressed?  Is hopelessness measured in ohms or centimeters?  There are so many variables in the human soul, and so many differences between souls, it seems hopeless to try.  Information of this sort is usually conveyed soul-to-soul, not by means of brain scans or arbitrary scales.    Not all “caring God” beliefs are equivalent, either.  Suppose somebody believes in Elvis, or in the Force, or in Jupiter, or has false beliefs about “the man upstairs” without any basis for them other than subjective feelings.  Assuming there is a true God for the sake of argument, would you rather have depressing beliefs about a true God, or comforting beliefs in a false god?  Would you rather have a false hope that makes you feel good, or a true hope that tugs on your conscience?  Better get that question settled first.  If feeling good is your highest priority, then there is no point in reading further; you’re irrational.    Of the possible contenders for true God who is also a caring God, not many options are available.  Buddha doesn’t care; he didn’t even want to be a god.  Hinduism has thousands of gods; which are you going to pick?  Which one really cares about you anyway, seeing you are obligated to follow your own karma?  Confucianism is a system of teachings without a personal God.  It’s doubtful readers of these pages will take seriously animism, polytheism, or any of the defunct religions of history.  Dittos for recent man-made cults like Scientology that made its founder filthy rich; who thinks for a minute that L. Ron Hubbard cares for you?    Of the religions with a personal God, there’s Islam, but imams teach it is impossible to know Allah, because his will is capricious.  There is no peace or assurance.  A Muslim never knows if Allah is satisfied. He can only hope at death he has done enough good works to make it.  That is the problem, too, with cults and misrepresentations of the God of the Bible.  If peace with God is based on our works, there is never a way to have assurance of salvation.  Judaism, having rejected Jesus Christ, keeps looking for a Messiah that never comes.  Without a temple or sacrificial system in place, it has no assurance of pleasing God.  Post-Christian Judaism has devolved into another religion of works, rituals and moral teachings.  Jews today do not “love” God.  They try to obey him, but they don’t generally have a sense of God as a caring father.    As a religion that tells of a caring God, Christianity stands alone and uncontested.  “For God so loved the world, that He gave his only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish, but has everlasting life.”  That’s the most favorite and well-known Bible verse on God’s care for His creatures (see it in every tongue), but it is certainly not the only one.  He so loved us that He did that.  Knowing that we could never reach up to Him, God reached down to us.  Knowing we could never do enough works to please Him, He did all the work himself.  While we were still sinners, Christ died for us (Romans 5).  Now he offers reconciliation as a free gift (Romans 6).  We receive that gift by receiving Christ himself (John 1).  We receive Christ by acknowledging our sin and turning from it, and confessing Him as the Lord (Romans 10).  Confessing Christ means saying He is Lord, trusting that what He did for us when he died on the cross and rose again was for our salvation.  By receiving Christ, we are born again (John 3, Romans 1-10) – saved from eternal death, and started on a new life.    If that were not enough care for the hopeless and broken-hearted, look at what else God’s gift provides: a full pardon from all our sin (Isaiah 55); a new nature capable of pleasing God (II Corinthians 5); the Spirit of God to live within us (Romans 8); access to God at all times through prayer (Luke 18), illumination to understand his Word (John 16); a family of believers to encourage and build us up, (Ephesians 2, Hebrews 13), a real purpose for life (I Corinthians 10) and the sure hope of heaven: a new, uncorrupted creation, beyond anything we can imagine (Revelation 21).  Talk about a cure for depression!  That kind of caring God can provide a peace that passes understanding (Philippians 4), and inner joy, confidence and assurance of His care even in trials (Romans 5, II Corinthians 4).Of course, you can play the pompous scientific elitist if you choose to.  You can reject all this, and mock belief in a caring God as superstitious nonsense.  Fine.  Depressed?  Who cares?  Tough luck.  Stuff happens.  Get over it.  Evolve, and may the farce of Darwin bewitch you – that is, till your protoplasm becomes manure for something else just as meaningless until the ultimate vanity – the heat death of the universe.Godless philosophy, pointless for me,None to cause us, but Cosmos–All that is, was, and ever shall be.From the big bang, to the slime soup,To the heat death, dark and old:Godless philosophy, it leaves me cold;Godless philosophy, it leaves me cold.Oh, and what was that issue about sense and nonsense again?  No comprendo, bud.  Get outta my way.(Visited 11 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

What I’m Hoping for in the New Year

first_imgOptions will become available for low-interest, long-term loans to finance efficiency improvementsThe PACE (property-assessed clean energy) program, when rolled out in a few cities between 2008 and 2010, was touted as a key solution to allow more homeowners to affordably finance energy conservation retrofits and renewable energy installations. Loan payments in PACE programs were able to be paid back as part of a homeowner’s property tax bill, and if the house was sold the loan would transfer with the house.Unfortunately, concern about who’s first in line for payment in the event of a default led to opposition to PACE financing by the loan agencies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Normally, property taxes are superior to debt obligations, and there was concern by lenders that PACE could enable home improvement loans owed to municipalities to be repaid before mortgage obligations to lending institutions.As this issue is being worked out, residential PACE financing is not available in most places, though there are some exceptions. I’m hopeful that 2013 will see PACE financing — or something like it — become commonplace nationwide. With snow gently falling as the holiday season winds down, I find myself reflecting on the New Year and what we might hope for. World peace of course, and solving the poverty conundrum would be great.But what about energy and the environment? Here are some thoughts: Leaving the car at home will become coolOf all the challenges we face in transitioning to a low-energy, low-carbon future, none will be harder than reducing our addiction to the gasoline-powered automobile. One solution to this dependence will be electric and plug-in-hybrid electric vehicles with distributed PV systems charging those car batteries. But we can also make tremendous strides by more actively embracing non-automobile transportation options.Public transit needs to be a key part of this. Light rail is an option where population density justifies the huge investment. A far-less-costly system, bus rapid transit, was developed in Curitiba, Brazil in the early 1970s and allows low-cost buses to function more like light rail, with passengers quickly boarding from platforms at the floor level of the bus having pre-paid their fares. More than a dozen cities in the U.S. have put bus rapid transit systems in place, and many others are on the drawing boards.In rural areas like much of Vermont, public transit can consist of smaller buses that travel the major routes on a regular schedule. Making these rural bus systems more viable may depend on increased frequency and employers helping to subsidize the cost.Making our communities more accessible to pedestrians and bicyclists is also part of the answer. We need to implement traffic-calming measures and build bicycle paths and safer bike lanes on our streets. In my own community, for example, the new West River Trail that extends from the Marina Restaurant in Brattleboro to Rice Farm Road in Dummerston, provides a nice alternative for bicycle commuters in good weather. Maybe 2013 can put us on the path to a future that moves beyond the standard automobile. More of us will recognize the connection between resilience and sustainabilityFollowing Superstorm Sandy, some editorials appeared suggesting that New York City suffered more than it needed to because the focus had been on sustainability or green rather than resilience. I couldn’t disagree more. I believe that the two are inextricably linked — or at least should be linked. Each benefits the other.The Resilient Design Institute, the nonprofit organization I created in mid-2012, will be working to strengthen this link between sustainability and resilience throughout 2013. I’m excited about that, as I believe that resilience can be the route to far greater buy-in to green building practices (along with sensible urban planning, ecosystem protection, and support for local food production). By the end of 2013 I’m hoping that resilience will be widely understood and increasingly embraced. We will finally put a value on carbonIn mid-2012, the conservative American Enterprise Institute (AEI) made headlines by sponsoring strategic meetings about the merits of a carbon tax. While not fully embracing the idea, AEI seems to be open to carbon taxes — generating ire among their conservative brethren. Also in 2012, former Republican Congressman Bob Inglis of South Carolina, launched an organization promoting carbon taxes, the Energy and Enterprise Initiative.I have long favored some form of tax on carbon or nonrenewable energy, rather than the more complex cap-and-trade approach that is being tried in a few places, most notably California. As Al Gore said in his 1992 book, Earth in the Balance, we should tax things we want to discourage, like resource consumption and waste generation, and not tax things we want to encourage, like earnings and savings. With elevated concern about climate change generated by Superstorm Sandy, perhaps 2013 will be the year to finally consider sensible ideas like carbon taxes. More utility companies will embrace solar powerCritics point out that photovoltaics (PVs) can’t replace our conventional power generation options. Indeed, it can’t do so alone, but it can be an increasingly important part of a long-term plan to move us toward a carbon-neutral society. Utility companies should look to Green Mountain Power, Vermont’s largest utility company, for progressive policies to expand the implementation of solar.Small-scale, distributed PV systems will play a key role in achieving Vermont’s Comprehensive Energy Plan, which calls for a shift to 90% reliance on renewable energy sources by the year 2050. Utility companies will play a key role in getting us there. Alex is founder of BuildingGreen, Inc. and executive editor of Environmental Building News. In 2012 he founded the Resilient Design Institute. To keep up with Alex’s latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed.last_img read more

ReadWrite DeathWatch: Sharp

first_imgRelated Posts 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now cormac foster On paper, Sharp does just that. In practice, however, it’s pretty obvious that the company is barely showing up to the fight for consumers. On its U.S. smartphone website, Sharp gives a completely unenthusiastic pitch for two of the world’s least exciting phones. Highlights (pulled directly from the site) include:Wi-FiA QWERTY keyboardTouch-screen navigation“A huge selection of downloadable Android applications.”In other words, features shared by every Android phone made by any manufacturer in the last three years. Compare that to Samsungs Galaxy S III blitz or Nokia’s PureView ad campaign. Sharp doesn’t even play to its strengths very well. For all the buzz it generates with announcements like the world’s biggest LED TV, Sharp has been incredibly unsuccessful branding Aquos televisions as a viable alternative to Samsung and Sony, and its oddly Sim City-esque LCD monitor microsite shows a complete lack of understanding of how to sell products – even without the typos (copyedit on “exsamples,” please).The PrognosisSharp’s own leaders have acknowledged that it can’t survive on its own. The most probable course of action is acquisition of its manufacturing assets, either through investment (like a proposed deepening of ties with Foxconn, the industry’s favorite sweat shop) or a post-bankruptcy sell-off. In either case, expect to see a reduction in consumer brands produced by the company.Can This Company Be Saved?Given its similar ties to Apple and previous investments in Sharp, Foxconn will probably play a role in Sharp’s future. The coupling could work. Foxconn’s financial backing and massive labor machine, combined with Sharp’s precision display expertise could create a high-quality, moderately priced television that could be perfect for a high-end consumer brand looking to make a big splash. But again, that puts Sharp’s fate in someone else’s hands.To see more ReadWrite DeathWatches, check out the ReadWrite DeathWatch Series, which collects them all, the most recent first.Buckle image from Sharp.com. Broken TV image courtesy of Shutterstock. Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Tags:#Deathwatch#Electronics Manufacture#mobile#television center_img IT + Project Management: A Love Affair After 100 years of innovation, Sharp is the worst-performing company in the world. In the end, its lack of consumer focus sealed the deal. The Basics100 years ago, a metalworker and inventor named Tokuji Hayakawa opened his first shop in Tokyo. On the backs of his “Tokubijo” snap belt buckle and “Hayakawa” mechanical pencil (also called the “Ever Ready Sharp”), he built an industrial empire that produced Japan’s first crystal radio, the world’s first mass-produced microwave oven, the first LCD calculator and some of the earliest solar panels. The company’s stock price peaked in 2000-2001, when the company released the first camera-equipped mobile phone and the groundbreaking AQUOS LCD televisions.Like most consumer electronics companies, Sharp took a hit in late 2001, but it didn’t recover as well as its competitors did. As market power shifted away from its strengths, Sharp began to suffer, despite maintaining technical leadership in LCD display technology. Sharp is currently the worst performing stock in the world, its credit rating has been cut to “junk” status, and its leadership has cast “material doubt” on its ability to survive. All options are on the table, and more than 60,000 jobs are at risk. The ProblemHow did things get so bad? A sluggish economy certainly played a role, and the emergence of Samsung didn’t help, but in the end, it was Sharp’s own lack of vision that drove the company into irrelevance.To be fair, the Japanese economy is struggling, and electronics companies are bearing the worst of it. Panasonic, the revenue leader in Japanese electronics, has lost $16.79 billion in the past 12 months, and on November 11, Moody’s cut Sony’s credit rating to one step above “junk” status. A reasonably strong yen hurts exports, the television market is glutted, and Japan’s domestic economy began shrinking for the first time in a year. A weak global recovery, troubles at home, and an emergent Samsung have hurt the entire Japanese electronics sector, but Sharp is bleeding nearly three times as fast as Sony (also on the ReadWrite DeathWatch list), as a percentage of total revenue, and its prospects are far more dire. The reason is more than just poor execution. It’s a lack of corporate identity.Sharp has all but given up on its consumer brand and accepted a role as a manufacturer of commodity parts. By all accounts, Sharp makes fantastic screens – that’s why Apple sources iPhone displays from the company. But in an industry as fickle as consumer electronics, being a supplier means losing control of your own destiny. As you move down the supply chain, margins become slimmer and the ability to control your own destiny shrinks. As Samsung has shown, the only path to long-term success as a widget manufacturer is to sell them in your own products. Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of…last_img read more

Fredriksen Others in for Up to 9 Newcastlemaxes at Bohai

first_imgzoom Chinese shipbuilder Bohai Shipbuilding Heavy Industries has received an order for up to nine Newcastlemaxes, according to broker reports.John Fredriksen Group has been tied to an order for up to four 208,000 dwt bulkers at the yard, comprising two firm and two optional ships, Compass Maritime said in a weekly report.The ships are scheduled for delivery in the fourth quarter of 2019, Asiasis said referring to the order.Berge Bulk has also been linked to an order for up to four Newcastlemaxes, also two firm plus two optional vessels.The ships are said to be slated for delivery in the first half of 2020.The company is yet to provide World Maritime News with a comment on the matter.Finally, Singapore’s RGL Shipping has reportedly placed an order for one Newcastlemax, to be delivered to the company in the first half of 2020.The bulkers will be built in accordance with the NOx IMO Tier II emission standards and are priced at around USD 45 million respectively, as disclosed by Compass Maritime.RGL Shipping and Berge Bulk have already had ships built by Bohai.Based on the data provided by VesselsValue, Bohai delivered one Capesize bulker to Berge Bulk in 2017, the Berge Grossglockner, and is going to deliver another Capesize to the company this year, the Berge Olympus.RGL Shipping is also set to take delivery of a Capesize newbuilding from the yard this year, the 210,000 dwt PSU Third.Both ships are expected to be delivered to their respective owners in January.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

The Toronto Maple Leafs Needed An American To Become Stanley Cup Contenders

When the NHL expanded in 1967, the Toronto Maple Leafs were, at least in terms of Stanley Cup championships won, the league’s second-most-successful franchise. They had won the Stanley Cup 13 times, just one fewer than the Montreal Canadiens, their Quebecois rivals. But while the modern era of the NHL1Defined as the time after that 1967 expansion from six to 12 teams. has been mostly good to the Canadiens — they’ve won the Stanley Cup 10 more times — it has been downright cruel to the Leafs: Their Stanley Cup tally remains stuck at 13, making the Leafs the only Original Six team that hasn’t lifted the Stanley Cup at least once in the NHL’s post-expansion age.Torontonians hope all that will change this season. The Leafs have jumped out to a quick start, winning six of their first nine games while scoring the fourth-most goals per game. The player doing a lot of that scoring — and a principal reason for Toronto’s early success — is a kid from the American desert named Auston Matthews.Of course, the California-born and Arizona-raised Matthews, who turned 21 last month, is a known entity at this point: In terms of point shares amassed in the first two seasons of a player’s career, he has been the best American since at least 1967-68, averaging 9.35 point shares per season. (Better than Mike Modano, better than Patrick Kane, better than Jeremy Roenick. You get the point.) If he can stay healthy and play into his late 30s, and keeping in mind that he hasn’t entered his prime yet, Matthews could finish with close to 200 point shares. This wouldn’t just qualify him as the greatest American player in NHL history; it would make him one of the best players in NHL history, period.Matthews, who averaged nearly a point per game as a 19- and 20-year-old, is averaging 1.78 points through nine games this season. The goals (he has 10 already) are coming easily, and if he keeps this up, he may break Alex Ovechkin’s post-1994-95 lockout record for goals in October.It’s unusual for an American to excel for a Canadian team. Many of the U.S. greats — Roenick, Modano and Kane, not to mention Brian Leetch, Chris Chelios and Pat LaFontaine — played the majority or the entirety of their careers stateside2To be sure, Canadian teams have had American heroes: Joe Mullen was the top point getter on the 1988-89 Calgary Flames team that won the Stanley Cup, and Gary Suter was that team’s second-best defenseman. Very young versions of John LeClair and Mathieu Schneider were pivotal role players on the 1992-93 Canadiens team that lifted the Cup. And the current iteration of the Winnipeg Jets is lousy with American talent.. In fact, it’s unusual for Americans to play in the Great White North at all. Some of that has to do with the drafting habits of Canadian teams: Just 51 of the 1,240 first-round draft picks since expansion have been Americans selected by Canadian teams, only four of whom were Toronto draftees. Americans have accounted for just 11.9 percent of skater games played for Canadian teams since expansion and have just 10.6 percent of the goals scored by Canadian teams. By contrast, Americans have accounted for 17.1 percent of player games played for American teams, and they have 15.0 percent of the goals scored by American teams. GamesGoalsAssistsPoints And in terms of Canadian teams that employ Americans, the Leafs rank low by percentage. Maple Leafs10.29.710.09.9 Canada11.9%10.6%10.9%10.7% Jets*21.521.422.822.3 United States17.115.015.515.3 Share by Americans Senators13.613.111.512.1 Only includes statistics by skaters (i.e., excludes goalies).Source: Hockey-Reference.com Share of Tm. Total by Americans Flames13.5%13.1%14.6%14.1% Which Canadian teams are outsourcing their hockey work?Share of total team player games played and offensive production (by skaters) for American players on Canadian franchises, 1967-68 to 2017-18 TeamGamesGoalsAssistsPoints Nordiques4.43.93.63.7 Canucks8.88.06.57.1 Oilers11.99.410.810.3 Canadiens12.18.89.39.1 Never trust an American to do a Canadian’s job, eh?Share of team stats produced by skaters born in the United States vs. Canada by franchise location, 1967-68 to 2017-18 * Includes both the pre-1997 Jets (who later became the Arizona Coyotes) and 2012-present Jets (who were formerly the Atlanta Thrashers).Source: Hockey-Reference.com Since expansion, Americans have accounted for just 10.2 percent of their skater games played. Only the Vancouver Canucks (8.8 percent) and Quebec Nordiques (4.4 percent)3Who, by the way, haven’t existed since they moved to Denver and became the Colorado Avalanche in 1995.have employed Americans at a lower rate. It’s strange, then, that they’ve hitched their wagon to a kid for whom pond hockey was a thing that only happened in Disney movies.The move has paid off so far: If Matthews isn’t the best player in the world, he’s not far off. And if he delivers the Stanley Cup to long-suffering Leafs fans, nobody in Toronto will think twice about where their savior grew up. read more

What Are The Mets Doing Part Infinity

FiveThirtyEight Embed Code More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed As the MLB trade deadline rapidly approaches, the New York Mets surprised fans and analysts alike with the acquisition of Marcus Stroman. Aside from this questionable move, there hasn’t been much buying and selling across teams. The Hot Takedown crew breaks down why this might be, what trades we still expect to see before the deadline and what effect this could have on the rest of the season.Journalist Lyndsey D’Arcangelo, whose work can be seen on The Athletic, joins the show to discuss the state of the WNBA as we head into the second half. D’Arcangelo helps make sense of the increased parity in the league and takes stock of the players having breakout seasons and the teams vying for the title.Our Rabbit Hole looks at those who occasionally lose their cool.What we’re looking at this week:Our thoughts on which teams should be buying and selling this MLB trade deadline.Our MLB model heading into the home stretch of the season.Lyndsey D’Arcangelo’s midseason breakdown of the WNBA for The Athletic.In light of Trevor Bauer’s heave, a list of similar outbursts. read more