Violence against broadcasting group and Tamil newspaper

first_img RSF_en December 13, 2004 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Violence against broadcasting group and Tamil newspaper July 15, 2020 Find out more July 29, 2020 Find out more News Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information Sri Lanka: RSF signs joint statement on attacks against human rights defenders, lawyers and journalists News Reporters Without Borders voiced concern about threats to the news media in the war-torn north and east of Sri Lanka today after a Tamil-language daily newspaper and the premises of a radio and TV group were the targets of violent attacks two days apart.The organisation said the attacks not only posed a threat to journalists but also denied the public reasonable access to news and information, and it called for thorough investigations to identify and punish those responsible.The more recent of the two attacks was on 8 December, when a grenade was thrown at the Colombo-based Tamil-language daily Thinakkural’s office in the eastern city of Batticaloa. It caused severe damage to the rear of the building but no one was hurt, although three employees were present at the time. No arrests have been made.Batticaloa was where journalist Aiyathurai Nadesan was murdered on 31 May. The city has seen a lot of violence, especially since a group lead by V. Muraleetharan, also known as Karuna, broke away from the Tamil Tigers (LTTE). Nadesan’s murder was blamed on Karuna’s group.A detailed report on the threats against journalists in eastern Sri Lanka was published by Reporters Without Borders on 13 July and is available in three languages (English, French and Sinhalese) on the organisation’s website (www.rsf.org).The earlier attack was on 6 December in the far-northern city of Jaffna, where around five thugs attacked the premises of the MTV/MBC broadcasting group, damaging all the equipment. The assailants not been identified.MTV/MBC is a network of radio and TV stations that broadcast in Sri Lanka’s three languages, Sinhalese, Tamil and English. Organisation center_img to go further Sri Lanka: tamil reporter held on absurd terrorism charge News Sri LankaAsia – Pacific News Sri LankaAsia – Pacific Follow the news on Sri Lanka Sri Lanka: Journalist manhandled by notorious police inspector currently on trial January 13, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Happy pills no laughing matter

first_imgLinkedin NewsLocal NewsHappy pills no laughing matterBy admin – October 15, 2009 864 13 year-old hospitalised after taking ‘Jokers’LAWS governing the sale of hallucinogenic and other stimulants from head shops have been questioned by the mother of a young teenage girl, who was hospitalised after purchasing and consuming party pills – otherwise known as happy pills – that she was told would “make her laugh”.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up This newspaper was contacted by the mother of the 13-year-old girl who lost feeling in both her legs and collapsed before being rushed to the Regional Hospital, where she was placed on a heart monitor.Now she warns parents of the dangers of some products available for sale in head shops.The girl was twice refused in separate head shops before finally purchasing a packet of ‘Jokers’ (party pills containing a mixture of ketones, herbal extracts and glucose).After taking the pills with her friend, both felt immediately ill. One claimed to have lost feeling in her hands, while the other collapsed and had to be taken to hospital.Both parents contacted the Gardai, but were alerted that no legislation exists to prohibit the sale of these products to anyone under 18.It is alleged when they bought the pills, they enquired as to what the effects they would have, and were reportedly informed that it would make them laugh.Robert Gardiner, proprietor of the city centre head shop Dark Side, stated: “Consumption of those pills for girls of that age would have the same effect as drinking 10 cans of red bull because of the high caffeine content.“The effects would vary from person to person. However, a child consuming those pills would be a lot more at risk than a person over the age of 18”.Although it is legal for shops to sell party pills and herbal incenses to all ages, local head shop owners are adamant that they refuse to sell their products to people under 18.The parents concerned fear that children might be at risk from taking party pills.They are calling for legislation to be brought in to ban the sale of these products to people under the age of 18.A legal source informed this newspaper of the grey area which these products fall into: “There seems to be no legislative powers in place as these products do not fall under the Misuse of Drugs Act, which would make them illegal. They are not regulated by the Pharmacies Act, where a prescription would be required; however any of the tobacco products would not available for sale to anyone under 18”.Local Labour TD, Jan O’ Sullivan, who has voiced her concerns about head shops in the past, said: “We clearly have a big problem that is directly affecting younger people”.After learning of the incident involving the girl being hospitalised, Deputy O’Sullivan is to put a Parliamentary question to the Dáil this week regarding the legal grey area which exists.A Limerick doctor, who preferred not to be identified, agreed with Deputy O’Sullivan’s concerns.“I have seen similar cases in the past”, he said.Robert Gardiner said, “A child consuming these pills would be a lot more at risk than a person over the age of 18” Email WhatsApp Advertisementcenter_img Print Facebook Twitter Previous articleReported crime down in city and countyNext articleUnusual position for Munster adminlast_img read more

Argentina Proposes To Uruguay “Complete, Extensive, And Absolute” Monitoring Of River

first_img The meeting took place ten days after Argentine environmentalists lifted a three-and-a-half year border blockade protesting a pulp plant they accuse of contaminating the Uruguay River. “I’ve brought a proposal for the monitoring of the Uruguay River, based on science and in the interest of resolving this issue as quickly as possible and turning our attention to tasks as important as the union of our peoples,” Argentine foreign minister Héctor Timerman said at a press conference in Montevideo. Tuesday morning, before traveling to Montevideo, Timerman declared that Argentina and Uruguay are “almost there” in resolving the lengthy conflict. By Dialogo July 01, 2010 Argentina proposed to Uruguay that they perform “complete, extensive, and absolute monitoring” of the river they share, the center of a prolonged conflict between the two countries, and Montevideo announced that it would make a counterproposal next week. In his first foreign trip after taking office last week, Timerman met for forty-five minutes with his Uruguayan counterpart, Luis Almagro, after which they were joined by Uruguayan president José Mujica and vice-president Danilo Astori for a two-hour joint lunch. In April, the International Court of Justice in The Hague found that Argentina had not provided “conclusive evidence” that the plant, owned by Finnish firm UPM (formerly Botnia), was contaminating the river and demanded that the two countries carry out joint environmental monitoring within the framework of the Uruguay River Administration Commission (CARU). As far as Brazil’s possible participation in the monitoring is concerned, the two foreign ministers indicated that this is something that the presidents of the countries involved will have to determine at a later stage. “We are ready for complete, extensive, and absolute monitoring of the entire Uruguay River along both banks and with all the guarantees that we all should have in favor of the environment,” he added, while refusing to disclose further details about the Argentine plan. On 2 June, Uruguayan president José Mujica and Argentine president Cristina Kirchner committed themselves to establishing criteria for the environmental monitoring of the river within two months.last_img read more

DTZ stubs out Imperial fight

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