[The Source Podcast] Dell EMC and Intel, a Winning Combination!

first_imgLike Dell EMC and Dell Technologies, Intel is transforming as a company.  According to Ricardo Moreno, VP and GM of Global Partner Sales, “Intel is going through the biggest transformation in our history”.  Intel Partner Connect provided the perfect opportunity to connect with Rachel Mushahwar (@RachelMushahwar) General Manager, Americas Industry at Intel.We talked IoT, Data Center, Flash technologies and client solutions, but more importantly, we talked solutions.  From reducing the time it takes for an MRI to performing financial transactions 10x faster.  From Intel’s 50th birthday, Moore’s Law, Intel IoT Market Ready Solutions, Drones and helping our customers transform the way they interact with their customers.Get Dell EMC The Source app in the Apple App Store or Google Play, and Subscribe to the podcast: iTunes, Stitcher Radio or Google Play.Dell EMC The Source Podcast is hosted by Sam Marraccini (@SamMarraccini)last_img read more

Welcome to the Maritime 21st Century and the New Quest for the Golden Fleece

first_imgI remember as a child being glued to the TV, watching famous oceanographer, Jacques Cousteau navigate his way under the sea. I found myself entering this magical world, where I could join endless varieties of fish in their natural habitat and wonder at the strange beauty of the marine landscape.The ocean’s potentialCousteau was a true pioneer, a visionary ahead of his time. Back in the 1970s, he spoke of the oceans’ potential, predicting a time when the world’s energy crisis would be solved by harnessing tidal and temperature changes in the sea; when metal ores would be mined from the ocean bed and when farmers in diving suits would gather food from marine plantations.Fast forward to today and I continue to be passionate about the ocean. As the Maritime Business Development Leader with Dell EMC OEM, it’s pretty exciting that the company I work for plays an important part in marine innovation.Revolutionising deep-sea explorationExactly why The Arggonauts from the Fraunhofer IOSB in Karlsruhe are using mobile robotics to revolutionise deep-sea exploration. The team is using customised Dell EMC workstation technology – the Dell EMC Precision  7910 – to power a cost-effective solution that maps the bottom of the ocean at a depth of several thousand metres.Powered by Intel® Xeon® processors, the Dell EMC workstations control remote operated vehicles from the shore as well as capturing subsea data camera images. HPC Datacentre compute renders the images and translates data into maps while Artificial Intelligence is used to quickly classify images from the unstructured data.Unmanned underwater technologies and advanced imaging systemsAs the only German group in the prestigious International Shell Ocean Discovery XPRIZE competition, the Arggonauts, under the leadership of Gunnar Brink, are ranked as just one of nine successful teams from around the world, who have made it through to the final round from the original line up back in 2016. With a prize fund of $7 million, this marine competition aims to discover the mysteries of the deep by combining the power of unmanned underwater technologies with mapping and advanced imaging systems.A modern day Jason, searching for the Golden FleeceFor me, this is Greek mythology reimagined – picture a modern day Jason on the Argo, travelling in unchartered waters, equipped with robotics in his quest for the Golden Fleece!In the final round, scheduled for this November, the Arggonauts will go head-to-head with the other finalists in a field test. The team’s specially designed, unmanned, underwater vehicles, called, “The Great Divers” will have to measure at least 250 square kilometres of the sea bed at a depth of 4,000 metres within 24 hours, find objects and take pictures that are worthy of an award. After completing this task, “The Great Divers” will be collected by autonomously-operated catamarans. The team then has 48 hours to convert the data into a map.The final frontierI believe that this work is critical for the future of our planet. Did you know that we currently have better maps of the moon and the surface of Mars than we do of the bottom of our oceans? It’s amazing to think that the final frontier may not actually be in space, but right here on Planet Earth. If you think about it, most intercontinental communications use deep-sea cables – you could say that the Internet practically comes from the sea! International trade is also linked to the marine world as import and export trade depend on container shipment.We need to accelerate innovationMost importantly, I am reminded of Cousteau’s predictions. With the development of deep-sea exploration coupled with the increasing growth in the world’s population, natural resources from the sea are set to become increasingly important. In my view, we need to urgently accelerate innovation in order to improve the speed, scale and image resolution that is necessary to truly understand the ocean.Protecting sustainable resourcesThe hope is that over the long-term this work will allow us to discover and protect new species and underwater life forms, along with safer methods of exploration. Of course, the kid in me also dreams that this work will shed new light on the ocean. As Cousteau said, “The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in its net of wonder forever.”This project also demonstrates our commitment to Dell4Good, where we put our technology and expertise to work for the good of our planet.  I wish the Arggonauts every success in the upcoming finals and would love to hear your comments and questions.To learn more about Dell EMC OEM Marine Solutions, visit: https://www.dellemc.com/en-us/oem/maritime.htmTo learn more about The Arggonauts, visit: www.arggonauts.comKeep in touch. Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/etienne_mary and @DellEMCOEM, and join our LinkedIn OEM & Iot Solutions Showcase page here.last_img read more

Report: Mexican economy shrinks 8.5% in 2020

first_imgMEXICO CITY (AP) — Mexico’s pandemic-hit economy shrank 8.5% in 2020. It was the largest single-year drop since 1932 and the second consecutive year of economic contraction. Mexico’s national statistics agency said Friday Mexico’s gross domestic product grew 3.1% in the final three months of the year. Growth in the second half of 2020 allowed Mexico to beat projections earlier in the year of a double-digit contraction. The second trimester of the year when the pandemic took hold and much economic activity was frozen saw a contraction of 18.7% compared to the same period a year earlier.last_img

Man who wore horns in US Capitol riot moved to Virginia jail

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — A man who stormed the U.S. Capitol while sporting face paint, no shirt and a furry hat with horns has been moved to a jail in Virginia after a federal judge ordered authorities to provide him with organic food while he’s in custody. Jacob Chansley was transferred to the Alexandria Detention Center after his attorney argued that his client hadn’t eaten in nine days because the Washington jail didn’t serve organic food. His attorney says Chansley lost 20 pounds since being transferred from Arizona last week. Chansley calls himself the “QAnon Shaman” and considers eating organic food to be part of his “shamanic belief system and way of life.”last_img

Virginia lawmakers pass marijuana legalization bills

first_imgRICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Both chambers of the Virginia General Assembly have passed legislation that would legalize marijuana for adult recreational use, with retail sales starting several years down the road. Work on the complicated legislation has been a priority for Democrats who control state government. But despite Friday’s votes, the process is far from finished. There are substantial differences between the two bills that must be worked out before they can be sent to Gov. Ralph Northam. If the legislation is signed into law, Virginia would join 15 other states and the neighboring District of Columbia in legalizing small amounts of marijuana for adult recreational use.last_img

Phone banks call for clean energy

first_imgIn preparation for the upcoming 40th anniversary of Earth Day, Repower Indiana will be on campus this week encouraging students to get involved with the movement toward a more environmentally-conscious America.“Repower Indiana is a clean energy campaign, funded and organized by the Alliance for Climate Protection,” Bobbie Stewart, communications director for Repower Indiana, said. “We want to inform people about the benefits of transitioning to a clean energy economy, as well as advocating for clean energy legislation.”Repower Indiana will be organizing phone banks where students can call Indiana residents, asking them to support clean energy legislation. Phone banks will be available from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. today in room 310 of DeBartolo Hall and Wednesday in the Gold Room of LaFortune Student Center.“People will be coming by and learning more about … how they can be involved with clean energy events around Notre Dame,” Stewart said. “During the phone banks, Repower volunteers will be calling community citizens and asking them to help reach out to [Indiana Senators Evan Bayh and Richard Lugar] to pass clean energy legislation.”A clean energy bill is expected to reach the Senate floor in the near future, and Stewart said the Indiana senators’ votes in support of this legislation are far from guaranteed. “We’re hopeful, it’s really hard to tell … Lugar is at least focused on conservation,” she said. “There’s some concern amongst the legislators that it will actually cost Indiana money, which we don’t believe is the case.”Stewart said she sees student involvement in the campaign and influence over the legislature as especially crucial.“Their impact, it’s far, wide and critical. There’s a recent poll of youths asking if they believe the country should be transitioning to a clean energy economy, and the answer was overwhelmingly high,” she said. “Over 70 percent was yes.”Notre Dame students, in particular, have an important voice, Stewart said.“Their vote and their voice matter,” she said. “It’s time to stand up and exercise that voice for an issue that will be affecting you today and tomorrow.”Stewart said Notre Dame students should be invested in climate protection for the same reasons as other Americans, but that students have even more at stake as members of the younger generation.“Just like anyone else, in the state, in the country, they stand to benefit from jobs that would receive funding from a clean energy initiative,” Stewart said. “The most important reason to transition is for a clean planet for future generations to come.”“One reason students are really motivated is the question of what’s going to be left for them in 30 or 40 years,” she said.Stewart said it is important for students not to underestimate the difference they can make in the push for a cleaner America. She considers the role of Indiana residents, especially students, central to ensuring for a clean energy bill to get passed by the Senate.“Again, I’d say we’re hopeful, but a lot of it depends on Hoosier engagement, people like Notre Dame students.”last_img read more

Professors react to Pope’s remarks

first_imgPope Francis made headlines worldwide when a lengthy interview with Italian Jesuit journal “La Civiltà Cattolica” published last Thursday suggested his leadership would alter the Catholic Church’s focus on social issues. Notre Dame theology experts said it is clear that Francis’ statements provide a potential perspective change but not a radical upending of Church teaching. Pope Francis’s words on abortion, same-sex marriage and contraception generated controversy. “It is not necessary to talk about these issues all the time,” Pope Francis said in the interview. “The dogmatic and moral teachings of the Church are not all equivalent. The Church’s pastoral ministry cannot be obsessed with the transmission of a disjointed multitude of doctrines to be imposed insistently.” Theology professor Fr. Brian Daley, a member of the Jesuit order like Pope Francis, said he does not find Francis’ ideas revolutionary but rather just a demonstration of different style and points of emphasis. “As [Pope Francis] has said, what he’s saying has been there in the Catechism, it’s been there in the teaching of the Church, but people perhaps haven’t realized it,” Daley said. “Part of it is the way the media picks it up and spins it. But I do think the style of the Pope is distinct, and it’s very much his own. And to a great extent, I think it comes out of his Jesuit spiritual background and the Jesuit way of approaching pastoral issues.” Daley said the Jesuit tradition has been to be at the service of the Church, training the members of the order intellectually “in the highest standards of the day,” but also to be deeply rooted spiritually in prayer, contemplation and the Gospels. “I think the basic instinct of the Jesuits and modern Ignatian spirituality in general is a pastoral one,” Daley said. “It’s a matter of asking what can we do to help people come into contact with Christ and follow him. “And as Francis says, it’s not that the rules that the Church presents us with are false or irrelevant, but the Church is not basically there to announce rules. It’s there to pronounce God’s love to people.” John Cavadini, theology professor and director of the Institute for Church Life at Notre Dame, said he sees Francis’ statements as a continuation of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI’s reminder to focus on the essentials of Catholicism. “What [Pope Francis] has been saying is very much in keeping with Pope Benedict,” Cavadini said. “I think people see there being this division between them, but remember that Pope Benedict published his first papal encyclical on love, called ‘God Is Love.’ I don’t think you can get more essential than that.” Benedict’s next two encyclicals were on hope and faith, respectively, and Cavadini said Francis’ statement last week highlights the same focus on these essentials in a different way. “Pope Francis has a very distinctive pastoral application of this emphasis on the essentials,” Cavadini said. “What he’s basically saying is that you don’t attract people to the faith and you don’t keep people in the faith by concentrating all the time on things that aren’t part of the essential proclamation. “And so what you end up doing, maybe, is making people forget what the essentials are if you’re always talking about other things and you have what he called a kind of ‘fragmented message.’ I think there is a very fundamental continuity with Pope Benedict’s emphasis on the basics, but I think there is a difference in style and a difference in pastoral application.” Pope Francis said the Church must find a new balance or else its moral edifice would be in danger of “[falling] like a house of cards.” Cavadini said Francis is trying to steer the attention to the most essential parts of Catholicism that make the faith vibrant to believers. “The whole point is to convey the beauty of the whole so the more difficult teachings don’t seem like just isolated invitations to desolations, but part of a larger piece and part of a Church that cares about everybody,” Cavadini said. “If the Church shows itself to be a caring communion, then it’s easier for people because there’s something lifted in their lives all the sudden if someone is willing to help them.” This “pastoral framework” for approaching people could transform the whole communion of the Church without altering any of its moral teachings, he said. Pope Francis’ new approach to these teachings partially stems from his different background compared to that of Pope Benedict. “Pope Benedict was a professor … and he became a bishop not out of a pastoral parish experience as much as from a professorial experience,” Cavadini said. “I don’t like people saying Benedict is bad and Francis is good; I think that’s just very superficial because Pope Benedict was a very loving person, a very smart person, but a professor. “He focused on the essentials but spun it as saying ‘these are our foundations, and that keeps us from succumbing to cultural relativism.’ I think Francis, taking the same emphasis on the essentials, says ‘how do we translate this into a way of pastoring or shepherding?’ I think Francis thinks that it translates into a pastoral care of warmth and presence … carries those essentials of the Gospel with them.” Daley said he sees Pope Francis as “an intellectual but not an academic,” especially taking into account his background in Argentina and his appreciation for world culture. “I think [Francis] operates on a fairly imaginative level,” Daley said. “And Benedict does too, but Benedict is the shyer person; he’s kind of an introvert, I think. And he’s a first-class intellectual theologian … where Francis is much more of an extrovert, a charismatic personality. “I think what he’s doing is a typically Jesuit approach, training himself as well as possible in human culture and human understanding … I think he’s really someone who tries to think in contact with the present time, but the reason for this is always to do the work of God and bring the Gospel to people.” Cavadini said viewing these issues as part of the larger context of the essentials of faith makes it clear that the Church’s mission goes beyond rule-making and finger-pointing. “These are pastoral issues before they’re political issues,” he said. “I think that makes a big difference to people’s lives. With this new approach, you create new possibilities with that warmth and presence and a willingness to bear people’s burdens with them.”last_img read more

CSC advocacy course promotes common good

first_imgStudents in the one-credit Advocacy for the Common Good course underwent nearly eight hours of training Saturday in preparation for a semester of researching social problems, planning response strategies and executing events to raise public awareness.Michael Hebbler, director of student leadership and senior transitions at the Center for Social Concerns (CSC), is teaching the advocacy course to students from Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s College and Holy Cross College.“It’s pretty broad, but for the purposes of this course, advocacy is accompanying people on the margins and working to change the structures that lead to oppression,” Hebbeler said.Courtesy of Michael Hebbeler Sophomore Jessica Peck, a student currently enrolled in the course, said the training helped her prepare to research and address deep-seeded social concerns.“The training session was a sampling of a lot of different ways of drawing attention to important issues,” Peck said. “We talked about what motivates people to act and how to tap into that when mounting an advocacy campaign.“We also talked specifics: What are necessary considerations when hosting an event? How do you conduct a successful lobbying visit to a congressman, senator or other elected official? How do you frame your issue when talking to the media?”Hebbeler said he plans for his students to split into four small groups to research and address specific social problems of interest to the Catholic Relief Services (CRS) and CSC, including immigration reform, the conflict in Syria, global hunger and incarceration. He said students will develop a clear message about the topic and share that message through a “public meeting,” anything from lobbying a congressional representative to hosting a rally.“The course project culminates in the public meeting, but we remind our students that it’s very much in the process where learning takes place,” Hebbeler said.Junior Matt Hing took Advocacy for the Common Good the first time it was offered in the spring of 2013. He said he studied immigration reform, worked on a letter-writing campaign and met with a congressional representative to discuss the issue.“You do the project, and you can see that you enacted actual change,” Hing said. “You see all your efforts. You see the result you made. You can see people are talking about it afterward, and that was a really cool feeling to see that a group of people can actually make a small-scale difference with enough time and enough resources.”Hebbeler said students often take Advocacy for the Common Good after they have first-hand experiences with injustice through programs like the CSC’s Border Issues Seminar. He said those students want to fight for justice but do not know how to accomplish real change.“The main reason for this course on advocacy is for students to channel their passions on different social issues that they’ve encountered through their time here at Notre Dame,” Hebbeler said. “You become impassioned and then you get back to campus and life goes on, things get busy and yet this passion remains.“We provide this course as 
a structured way forward to work on those issues and effect change … We provide a way for [students] to address the root causes, the structures that create the injustice that they’ve encountered.”Hebbeler said he worked with the CRS to implement the course last January. He said the CRS previously sent one representative to campus each semester to train the students in advocacy and prepare them for their work during the semester, but this year an additional CRS representative came to observe the process.“No other school is doing this exact thing with CRS,” he said. “We have other courses [at Notre Dame] that are examining advocacy … but as far as working with CRS in this manner on an accredited advocacy course, there are no other programs like that and courses like that.”The class closely aligns with Catholic Social Teaching and the Church’s views on human dignity, Hebbeler said.“These are large-scale issues, but Catholic Social Teaching reminds us that it’s the dignity of each individual that we are seeking to uplift, to protect, and that does something to our dignity,” he said. “Justice is right relationship, and so for the dignity of persons on the margins, but also our own dignity, we seek out these issues and we commit to the work in the name of solidarity.”Peck said she considered the course her opportunity to follow a call to action.“We can’t be content wishing well on the world or feeling bad because some people don’t have food to eat and that’s just too bad,” she said. “We are in a position to act, and this class is giving us the tools to do that.”Tags: CSClast_img read more

Notre Dame looks to start stadium construction in 2014

first_imgThe University is hoping to begin massive construction on Notre Dame Stadium after the conclusion of the 2014 football season, University President Fr. John Jenkins said in an interview with The Observer.The Notre Dame Board of Trustees has endorsed a plan to build three buildings totaling 750,000 square feet that will surround the Stadium. The project, titled the “Campus Crossroads Project,” is expected to cost $400 million, Jenkins said. Courtesy of the University of Notre Dame Pending approval from the Board of Trustees, the Campus Crossroads Project will add a new student center, a digital media studio and academic offices to the existing StadiumWhile gaining the Board’s endorsement is a big step forward for the University, Jenkins said Notre Dame would still need to raise the funds for the project. Notre Dame’s policy to have 100 percent of the funding promised and 50 percent in hand before construction begins.“We need to find benefactors who will support this project because we won’t go ahead unless the funding is in place,” Jenkins said. “So, it’s contingent on that. We’re optimistic about getting that done. … But until we get that, we can’t say definitely, we’re doing it.”Jenkins said about half of the funding would come from benefactors and the rest would come from various sources, including revenue from football tickets. The project would not be funded by revenue from existing seating, a release from the University said.Student ticket prices would not be directly influenced due to the new construction, instead the new premium seating (3,000 to 4,000 additional club seats) would help fund the project, Jenkins said.According to Jenkins, the project is expected to take 33 months from start to finish but the Irish will still be playing all scheduled home games in the Stadium. Ideally, Jenkins said the University would make the decision to go ahead with the project in August and start building after Notre Dame’s home finale against Louisville in November.Commencement ceremonies, which are typically held in Notre Dame Stadium, may have to be moved elsewhere during the 33-month construction, possibly the Joyce Center, Jenkins said.“I don’t want to say because it’s not definite yet,” Jenkins said. “We’re going to play football there, but there may be a problem with graduation so we’ll have to gather people together and see what we need to do.”Jenkins said the University would need South Bend’s approval but that he expects they won’t take exception to it.The University expects to employ all local construction trades locally, spokesperson Paul Browne said. Notre Dame could also contract some Chicago-area companies to help with construction.“The demand for skilled trades and crafts building will probably exhaust the local area and beyond,” Browne said. “But who the entities doing that, whether it’s Chicago or elsewhere, that hasn’t been decided yet.”Jenkins said Notre Dame would look first towards South Bend for construction companies.“I know primarily we are going to look [in South Bend], we want to give the opportunities for jobs to the local community,” Jenkins said. “I know we’ve worked with these companies before. My understanding is this project will just tap out all of the available resources, so I don’t know if we will need to go beyond that. We’re certainly going to start here.”Vice President of Student Affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding said the companies 360, Slam and Workshop Architects have been some of the firms Notre Dame has worked with so far.Last May, Notre Dame commissioned a feasibility study to decide if additional buildings were needed around the Stadium. Jenkins said the University had a concept that evolved over time.“What we had to do is ask ‘What are our needs?’” Jenkins said. “What are our needs for buildings? We had a strategic plan and each of the buildings we’re envisioning were part of that plan. They were envisioned as these were the things we need. We don’t know where it’s going to be. We don’t know the design. These are the facilities we need. So our question is ‘Could our needs fit this structure?’”Jenkins said the original plan was to have buildings on all four sides of Notre Dame Stadium but only ones on the east, south and west sides are in the plans. He said Hesburgh Library and “Touchdown Jesus” could have been kept visible with a building there but there simply was not a need for one.Tags: Board of Trustees, Campus Crossroads, Commencement, Erin Hoffmann Harding, football, Fr. John Jenkins, Hesburgh Library, John Jenkins, Notre Dame Stadium, South Bendlast_img read more

Series examines gender in theology

first_imgSaint Mary’s Theology on Fire series examined gender’s role in Christian theology with a discussion on “American Women and the Permanent Diaconate” facilitated by Katherine Harmon, a theology professor from Marian University.Harmon began the conversation by recalling a project given to her by a former professor at Notre Dame called “On the Archives.” She said the assignment was fairly open-ended and meant to delve into a particular subject of the student’s choice.Harmon said she researched the word “women” and soon came across “woman diaconates.”Harmon asked the event’s attendees if they could recall the role of a deacon. The audience said deacon’s responsibilities include teaching, reading and assisting with baptism.“The role of the deacon has to do with service,” Harmon said.Harmon listed statistics pertaining to the average American deacon, including level of education, age and marital status.“One-hundred percent of contemporary deacons are male,” she said.Harmon said the historically, this hegemony was not always the case. Harmon said various sources, like unclear passages from books in the Bible like Timothy and Romans, as well as letters from Church authority recognized the role of deaconesses.Given this public information, Harmon said she pondered why the idea of a woman in the role of deacon seem so foreign to Catholics today.“The issue, it seems, is dealing with the word ordination,” Harmon said. “If you took the present definition and tried to apply it to the past, these women were not ordained.”Harmon said although she was unaware of a specific modern-day movement to return women to the role of deaconess, she was personally motivated to share this information because it is the unknown truth.“To me, it is crucial to see that women were there and to see where they were. It is important to recognize the presence of women in history, especially in the liturgy,” Harmon said.Tags: theology on firelast_img read more