USA TODAY Is Getting Crushed For This New Scott Frost Story

first_imgScott Frost coaching at Nebraska.LINCOLN, NE – SEPTEMBER 08: Head coach Scott Frost of the Nebraska Cornhuskers approaches the sidelines in the second half against the Colorado Buffaloes at Memorial Stadium on September 8, 2018 in Lincoln, Nebraska. (Photo by Steven Branscombe/Getty Images)Scott Frost has yet to win a game at Nebraska, as the Huskers are off to an 0-6 start for the first time in program history, but one thing is extremely clear: he is not getting fired.It’s not up for debate and it’s not worth discussing – at all – but USA TODAY decided to write a story this morning about the possibility.“Nebraska would owe Scott Frost as much as $26 million if school decides to terminate embattled football coach,” they write.Nebraska would owe Scott Frost as much as $26 million if school decides to terminate embattled football coach https://t.co/jSJZx40LLa— USA TODAY Sports (@usatodaysports) October 14, 2018From the story:At present, moving on from Frost would mean the school would be obligated to pay Frost as much as $26 million. Frost’s contract originally was for seven years, through Dec. 31, 2024. Nebraska would owe him $5 million for each year remaining through Dec. 31, 2022, with any partial year paid pro-rata. Then it would owe him $2.5 million for each of the final two years.The final tab for Frost likely would be offset by income from his future employment, but the school also would be looking at obligations to his 10 assistants and his top strength coach, all of whom are under contract through Dec. 31, 2019. They would be owed all of the money remaining on their deals. So if none of them were retained, that would add up to at least another $4.875 million, also subject to offset from future employment.Nebraska is still paying both of Frost’s predecessors, Bo Pelini and Mike Riley. The payout for Pelini, which is being offset by his contract as Youngstown State’s head coach, continues through February 2019 at a rate of about $1.5 million annually. Riley was owed about $6.6 million when he was fired last year. He is now an assistant at Oregon State, but his pay there isn’t doing much to help Nebraska. His salary is $50,004; he got a $35,000 signing bonus and is scheduled to get a $35,000 retention payment in 2019.Unsurprisingly, the reaction to the story has been like this:You guys are ridiculous— Damon Benning (@damonbenning) October 14, 2018Man, that’s a dumb story— Brian Christopherson (@Husker247BC) October 14, 2018Don’t think anyone is calling for him to be fired. Certainly none of the 20,000 plus fans who travelled to Chicago are. We are as frustrated as he is but know patience is required.— Timothy Farmer (@Tim_W_Farmer) October 14, 2018If only there was a penalty for poor journalism!! ???— StansB1GFan ???☠️♥️ (@saf2564) October 14, 2018This is premature. He hasn’t even been there a full season. Nebraska fans need to chill.— Jamesetta Cleveland (@sports_mom_u) October 14, 2018Nebraska, meanwhile, returns to the gridiron on Saturday. The Huskers are taking on Minnesota at 3:30 p.m. E.T. The game will be on BTN.last_img read more

Central African Republic President says country remains fragile despite progress on peace

“We are mobilized for the implementation of this Agreement, with the support of the guarantors [African Union and the Economic Community of Central African States] and the Facilitators, foremost among which are the United Nations. through the [UN integrated peacekeeping mission in the country, known as MINUSCA],” he told UN Member countries.“With the support of all our partners in the subregion and around the world, we are making progress, albeit modest, but sure, in extending State authority throughout the country, as well as on national security and defense reforms,” he said.This, he explained, would facilitate the gradual redeployment of the Defense and Security Forces and the continuation of the national disarmament, demobilization, reintegration and repatriation programme, known as DDRR, already underway. Mr. Touadéra also noted the recent launch of development programmes as a demonstration that early peace dividends from the deal are a reality.At the same time, he acknowledged that much remained to be done, as the situation in CAR “remains fragile.”“Armed groups continue to supply war materials and ammunition illegally, [and are] guilty of massive and repeated violations of international humanitarian and human rights law,” he said, adding: “But, as you know, only the legal and legitimate forces of the CAR are embargoed, depriving the State of the means to fulfill its mission of protecting the citizens and the territory.”While President Touadéra welcomed the UN Security Council’s decision to ease the arms embargo regarding the defense and security forces, had called for a total lifting of the measures to allow the State to extend its authority over the entire national territory, with a view to protecting the civilian populationIndeed, he said that all the conditions set out by the relevant Council Sanctions Committee had been met, in addition to significant progress towards reforming the defense and security sectors.“To overcome the crisis that has shaken my country, and in line with the theme of our session, I call for a multilateral, dynamic, concerted, coherent and coordinated,” he stated, adding that he hoped the international community would remain mobilized alongside the people and the Government of the CAR. read more