Border officials dont have data to address racial bias in facial recognition

first_img Facial recognition Facial recognition is going to be everywhere Share your voice Tags Gender and race pose a challenge for facial recognition. Studies have shown the technology has a harder time identifying women and people with darker skin. Civil rights advocates warn that the shortcomings could adversely affect minorities. Several airports and airlines have rolled out the biometric tech across the US, offering a faster way to board your flights. The technology scans a traveler’s face and matches it with a passport photo provided to the airlines by the State Department. It’ll be used in the top 20 US airports by 2021. CBP says it has a match rate in the high 90th percentile, while a study from the DHS’ Office of Inspector General found that it had a match rate closer to 85%. Customs and Border Protection says the system is getting better. A spokesman for the agency noted that the OIG study drew from a demo in 2017 that looked at the potential for the Traveler Verification Service.”In the current deployment of TVS,” the spokesman said, “CBP has been able to successfully photograph and match over 98% of travelers who have photos in U.S. Government systems.”In addition, CBP is working with the National Institutes of Standards and Technology to analyze the performance of face-matching tech, “including impacts due to traveler demographics and image quality,” the spokesman said. A lack of diverse data is what led to racial bias with facial recognition to begin with. Experts have suggested that photo databases for facial recognition could be using more images of white people than people of color, which skews how effective the technology is for minorities.  Jake Laperruque, a senior counsel at the Constitution Project, is concerned that the agency is turning a blind eye to the potential for racial bias at airports.”The comments reflect a troubling lack of concern about well-documented problem of facial recognition systems having higher error rates for people of color,” Laperruque said in an email. “CBP can’t simply ignore a serious issue and take a ‘see no evil approach’ — if they’re not willing to confront serious civil rights problems and deal with them, they shouldn’t be trusted to operate a program like this.”  Originally published May 6.Updated May 8: Added comment from a CBP spokesman. 10 Comments A woman boarding an SAS flight to Copenhagen goes through facial recognition verification system VeriScan at Dulles International Airport in  Virginia. Jim Watson / AFP/Getty Images Facial recognition technology is prone to errors, and when it comes to racial bias at airports, there’s a good chance it’s not learning from its mistakes. Debra Danisek, a privacy officer with US Customs and Border Protection, talked to an audience Friday at the International Association of Privacy Professionals Summit about what data its facial recognition tech collects — but more importantly, what data it doesn’t collect.”In terms of ‘Does this technology have a different impact on different racial groups?’ we don’t collect that sort of data,” Danisek said. “In terms of keeping metrics on which groups are more affected, we wouldn’t have those metrics to begin with.” In other words, while the CBP does collect data that’s available on people’s passports — age, gender and citizenship — to help improve its facial recognition algorithm, it doesn’t gather data for race and ethnicity, even when a passenger is misidentified.So the CBP doesn’t know when there’s a mismatch based on a person’s skin color. It’s relying on reports from the Department of Homeland Security’s Redress program to identify when that happens.  “If they notice we have a pattern of folks making complaints this process, then we would investigate,” Danisek said. Now playing: Watch this: Politics Security 3:28last_img read more

RPO reform uncertain ahead of national polls

first_imgThe election commission is uncertain whether it can bring amendment to the Representation of the People Order (RPO) ahead of the 11th parliamentary elections, reports UNB.”After receiving the review (report) over proposed amendments from the (EC’s) subcommittee, it will be clear if the RPO amendments can be made effective by passing in this (10th) parliament,” said EC secretary Helalauddin Ahmed while briefing reporters after a meeting of the commission on Thursday.He made the remark responding to a question whether the commission will get time to make the RPO amendment passed in the 10th parliament.When the draft amendment is finalised, the commission will be able to say whether the amendment could be passed in the next session of parliament, he added.The EC is yet to finalise the draft amendment to RPO though it was supposed to do this by December last as per its roadmap prepared for the next general election.The EC’s ‘subcommittee to reform electoral laws and rules’ placed a set of proposals regarding the RPO amendment in the EC’s meeting on 9 April.The commission in its meeting on Thursday discussed the proposals and sent those to the subcommittee for further review.The EC secretary said the subcommittee brought 35 amendment proposals for the RPO and the commissioners examined those in the meeting. The commission asked the subcommittee to review the proposals further.Helaluddin said though no timeframe was fixed for the subcommittee to place the review report, it was requested to do it as early as possible.last_img read more

Talk session to foster economic cultural ties between India and China

first_imgKolkata: Zha Liyou, Consul General, the Consulate General of the Peoples’ Republic of China in Kolkata felt that the sectors such as manufacturing, food processing, finance, technical training, sports, tourism and shooting films could play a major role in strengthening the bilateral relationship between India and China.He was addressing a Special Session “India-China Economic Ties: A Sub-National Perspective” organised by Merchants’ Chamber of Commerce and Industry at its office on Thursday. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataHe also mentioned about cultural and educational exchanges and spoke about Kunming which could be a dream wedding destination for the people from across the country. Referring to age-old relationship of India and China, Liyou said that the relationship in both the state and provincial level should be fostered better as a part of bilateral relationships. He pointed out that there could be an exchange of more business delegations between Kunming and Kolkata and focus areas would be agro technology, mining, healthcare and hospitals tourism and hotels and solid waste management. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateBoth the Centre and provincial governments may find business solutions to further promote economic, cultural and educational ties between two countries at the sub national level. He said that Kolkata – Kunming and West Bengal – Yunnan relationships could be taken to a new high even though India and China have different structure with India having collaborative federalism and China having strong Government at the Centre. On tourism he said that while in 2018, 8 lakh Indian tourists went to China, the corresponding figure for Chinese tourists to India was only 2 lakh, which needs to be addressed. He also urged the governments of both the countries to generate more business. Earlier, in his welcome address, Vishal Jhajharia, President of the Chamber spoke about India’s huge trade deficit with China, which has been an area of concern over the years.last_img read more