Border officials dont have data to address racial bias in facial recognition

first_img Facial recognition Facial recognition is going to be everywhere Share your voice Tags Gender and race pose a challenge for facial recognition. Studies have shown the technology has a harder time identifying women and people with darker skin. Civil rights advocates warn that the shortcomings could adversely affect minorities. Several airports and airlines have rolled out the biometric tech across the US, offering a faster way to board your flights. The technology scans a traveler’s face and matches it with a passport photo provided to the airlines by the State Department. It’ll be used in the top 20 US airports by 2021. CBP says it has a match rate in the high 90th percentile, while a study from the DHS’ Office of Inspector General found that it had a match rate closer to 85%. Customs and Border Protection says the system is getting better. A spokesman for the agency noted that the OIG study drew from a demo in 2017 that looked at the potential for the Traveler Verification Service.”In the current deployment of TVS,” the spokesman said, “CBP has been able to successfully photograph and match over 98% of travelers who have photos in U.S. Government systems.”In addition, CBP is working with the National Institutes of Standards and Technology to analyze the performance of face-matching tech, “including impacts due to traveler demographics and image quality,” the spokesman said. A lack of diverse data is what led to racial bias with facial recognition to begin with. Experts have suggested that photo databases for facial recognition could be using more images of white people than people of color, which skews how effective the technology is for minorities.  Jake Laperruque, a senior counsel at the Constitution Project, is concerned that the agency is turning a blind eye to the potential for racial bias at airports.”The comments reflect a troubling lack of concern about well-documented problem of facial recognition systems having higher error rates for people of color,” Laperruque said in an email. “CBP can’t simply ignore a serious issue and take a ‘see no evil approach’ — if they’re not willing to confront serious civil rights problems and deal with them, they shouldn’t be trusted to operate a program like this.”  Originally published May 6.Updated May 8: Added comment from a CBP spokesman. 10 Comments A woman boarding an SAS flight to Copenhagen goes through facial recognition verification system VeriScan at Dulles International Airport in  Virginia. Jim Watson / AFP/Getty Images Facial recognition technology is prone to errors, and when it comes to racial bias at airports, there’s a good chance it’s not learning from its mistakes. Debra Danisek, a privacy officer with US Customs and Border Protection, talked to an audience Friday at the International Association of Privacy Professionals Summit about what data its facial recognition tech collects — but more importantly, what data it doesn’t collect.”In terms of ‘Does this technology have a different impact on different racial groups?’ we don’t collect that sort of data,” Danisek said. “In terms of keeping metrics on which groups are more affected, we wouldn’t have those metrics to begin with.” In other words, while the CBP does collect data that’s available on people’s passports — age, gender and citizenship — to help improve its facial recognition algorithm, it doesn’t gather data for race and ethnicity, even when a passenger is misidentified.So the CBP doesn’t know when there’s a mismatch based on a person’s skin color. It’s relying on reports from the Department of Homeland Security’s Redress program to identify when that happens.  “If they notice we have a pattern of folks making complaints this process, then we would investigate,” Danisek said. Now playing: Watch this: Politics Security 3:28last_img read more

Trump hails North Koreas brilliant potential

first_imgThis combination of pictures created on March 9, 2018 comprising of an undated picture released from North Korea`s official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on January 17, 2018 showing North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un visiting the newly-renovated Pyongyang Teachers` University in Pyongyang and US President Donald Trump applauding as he stands in front of the Warsaw Uprising Monument on Krasinski Square during the Three Seas Initiative Summit in Warsaw, Poland, July 6, 2017. Photo : AFPUS and North Korean officials met Sunday at a border truce village as preparations resumed for a high-stakes, high-drama summit that president Donald Trump suggests could help the North realize its “brilliant potential.“I truly believe North Korea has brilliant potential and will be a great economic and financial Nation one day,” Trump said on Twitter.“Kim Jong Un agrees with me on this. It will happen!,” the president said, confirming that a US team “has arrived in North Korea to make arrangements for the summit” between himself and North Korean leader Kim.His upbeat language contrasted sharply to that of only three days earlier, when Trump cancelled the planned summit, citing “open hostility” from the North. An extraordinary flurry of diplomacy since then-much of it led by South Korea-appears to have put the meeting back on track.Kim and South Korean president Moon Jae-in met Saturday at the Panmunjom border truce village, in a surprise bid to salvage the 12 June summit planned for Singapore.Announcing the lower-level talks held Sunday, State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said, “We continue to prepare for a meeting between the president and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.”The Washington Post reported that the US delegation to the Panmunjom meeting-in the Demilitarized Zone between North and South Korea-was led by Sung Kim, a former US ambassador to South Korea and former nuclear negotiator with the North. It said the Americans met with North Korean vice foreign minister Choe Son Hui.Tokyo stocks opened higher Monday on the news, although trading was thin.“Excessive worries receded as efforts resumed for a summit between the US and North Korea,” Okasan Online Securities strategist Yoshihiro Ito said in a commentary, which added that uncertainty remains.The United States currently has no ambassador to South Korea, even as it takes up one of the most delicate diplomatic challenges in years.It remains far from clear how Trump and Kim might be able to bridge what appear to be vast differences in their expectations for what would be a historic meeting. But analysts on Sunday expressed increasing confidence that it will take place.Days of brinkmanshipThe apparent progress in the on-again-off-again talks followed a tense and turbulent few days of diplomatic brinkmanship.Within 24 hours of cancelling the summit Trump reversed course, saying it could still go ahead after productive talks were held with North Korean officials.“It’s moving along very nicely,” Trump said at the White House on Saturday. “We’re looking at 12 June in Singapore. That hasn’t changed.”His abrupt decision to pull out of the meeting had blindsided South Korea and Moon, who had been brokering a remarkable detente between Washington and Pyongyang in a bid to avoid a devastating conflict.But Trump accompanied the cancellation with a letter to Kim that mixed tough language with an almost beseeching plea to get things back on track. Some critics mocked the letter’s tone, but it may have achieved the desired result.Kim ‘met his match’James Clapper, director of US national intelligence under former president Barack Obama, told CNN “I support the letter that president Trump sent… In some ways, Kim Jong Un may have met his match here with our very unconventional president.”Victor Cha, who was president George W Bush’s top advisor on North Korea and was briefly expected to get Trump’s nod as ambassador to South Korea, said Sunday he was now confident the summit will take place.The Moon and Trump administrations very much want the meeting, he said, “and Kim says he wants a summit, so it’s going to happen.”There are still stark differences between what the two sides hope to achieve.Washington wants North Korea to quickly give up all its nuclear weapons in a verifiable way in return for sanctions and economic relief.Pyongyang has a different view of denuclearization and remains deeply worried that abandoning its deterrent would leave the country-and its leader-vulnerable, especially while the United States maintains a robust military presence in South Korea.Kim “has almost an emotional attachment and a personal psychological attachment to these nuclear weapons,” US senator Marco Rubio said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week.” “They make him feel prestigious, they make him feel powerful.”If Trump is unable to negotiate those weapons away and unwilling to live in a world where North Korea poses a nuclear threat, then “you’re going to have to do something to go after them at some point,” the senator said.last_img

Swechchhasebak League leader murdered in Pirojpur

first_imgJony Talukdar. Photo: CollectedA Swechchhasebak League leader was stabbed to death allegedly by his rivals at Kabutarkhali village of Mathbaria upazila of Pirojpur on Monday, reports UNB. The deceased Jony Talukdar, 25, was vice-president of Gulishakhali union unit Swechchhashebak League and son of Hashem Ali Talukdar of the village.He was a supporter of upazila polls independent candidate Rezaul Islam, who had rivalry with Awami League candidate Hossain Mosharraf Shakku.Jony was critically injured after supporters of Shakku reportedly attacked him around 8:45am, said Shawkat Anwar, officer-in-charge of Mathbaria police station.He succumbed to his injuries around 1:00pm while being taken to Sher-e-Bangla Medical College Hospital.Police arrested Jahangir, a supporter of Shakku after the attack.last_img read more