Change to hunting policies: Guide Outfitters of B.C. says there’s no impact on locals

first_img“There are approximately 100,000 resident hunters in the province and approximately 5,000 guided clients,” says Ellis. “That generates a total of $350 million in revenue – about $230 million comes from the resident hunting community – $120 million comes from the non-resident or guided community.”Ellis adds the important role guided hunters play within the tourism industry.“British Columbia is a destination that a lot of people want to come to; there’s a wide variety of game, it’s very clean, It’s very safe, it’s English speaking, and it’s on a lot of people’s bucket list.”The northern region of B.C. also has its own unique game that many hunters are after, says Ellis.Advertisement “The predominate reason to come to the Peace – the number one I say would be – well the number one and two non-resident licence sales are black bear and moose, but there’s a lot of sheep in the north people are pretty passionate about – love to come here for – a lot of people come for elk as well.”Ellis says he does however understand why resident hunters of northern B.C. find the issue of non-resident hunting allocation to be so contentious.“I think most British Columbians actually are concerned about wildlife, so whenever there’s a decision made around the sharing of wildlife or the harvesting of wildlife – those are both very compassionate decisions …they have very, very strong opinions and feelings towards wildlife and how they’re managed.” “Of the 17,000-ish LEH – so those are the draws – and again, only grizzly bears in the north, this is potentially a loss of about 600 – so about a 3.5 per cent loss,” explains Scott Ellis, the executive director for the Guide Outfitters of B.C. “So what see, really around the province, is no significant impact whatsoever to resident hunter opportunity.”Ellis says the final decision made by the province after consulting with the B.C. Wildlife Federation, The Guide Outfitters of B.C. and the B.C. Trappers Association, was not made hastily.“Ten years in the process of negotiating, and discussing, and coming up with a fair and balanced decision around the species that need to be allocated, and what share should go to the guided community and what share should go to the resident hunting community,” says Ellis.- Advertisement -Hunting policies have been an issue in B.C. for nearly 15 years, with meeting continuously being held between the Wildlife Federation and the Guide Outfitters – using Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Steve Thomson as a mediator.After ten years of negotiations, Minister Thomson made the decision for them – which has now raised the concern of various organizations about the possible decrease in local hunting permits and an increase for outfitters.Ellis goes on to explain the impact of the outfitters on the provincial economy.Advertisementlast_img read more

Half-time: Fulham 1 Huddersfield 0

first_imgHugo Rodallega’s sixth goal of the season put Fulham ahead at half-time as they looked to extend their unbeaten league run. Aside from an early George Williams shot which was saved, the Whites were largely pinned back in their own half by Huddersfield, who twice came close to taking the lead in the first 20 minutes.Fortunately for Fulham, Elsad Zverotic was in the right place to clear Mark Hudson’s header off the line and then Harry Bunn somehow contrived to roll a shot past the post when he only had keeper Marcus Bettinelli to beat.When Huddersfield shot themselves in the foot again, this time at the other end, Fulham were quick to pounce. Hudson, who began his career at Fulham as a youngster, miscontrolled just inside his own half, Rodallega nipped in and after receiving a return pass from Ross McCormack, slotted past the goalkeeper.It wasn’t to spark a spell of Fulham pressure, however. Instead, Huddersfield continued to probe without ever finding the killer pass to expose an anxious-looking Whites defence.And Fulham had two good chances to score a second. George Williams fired into the side netting from an angle and in first half injury time, Rodallega wastefully nodded over from Lasse Christensen’s cross.Kit Symons made two changes from the side which drew with Blackpool in midweek, McCormack returning after suspension, replacing Moussa Dembele, and Kostas Stafylidis replacing the injured Fernando Amorebieta at left-back.Fulham (4-1-2-1-2): Bettinelli; Zverotic, Bodurov, Burn, Stafylidis; Parker; Christensen, Williams; Ruiz; Rodallega, McCormack.Subs: Kiraly, Hutchinson, Eisfeld, Roberts, Woodrow, Dembele, Hyndman.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Scientific Supporters of ES Stem Cell Research Fear Future Abuses

first_img“How would you know if a human brain was trapped in a mouse’s body?”  This frightful and intriguing question opened an article in Nature this week.1  More on that in a minute.    Last week, in the Oct. 14 issue,2 a Nature editorial on California’s Stem Cell Proposition 71 stated that “the proposal is less of an unalloyed blessing than it seems.”  Though most professional scientists are eager for funds to test embryonic stem cells, Nature feared that the proposition goes overboard.  It amends the state constitution, threatens a state economy that is near insolvency, and promises it will pay for itself, “But it is not clear that these analyses hold water.”  Worst of all, it prevents oversight by the state legislature, expecting the researchers to police themselves.  Surprisingly, Nature supports government oversight of scientific funding.  The NIH and NSF at the federal level, which operate under the scrutiny of Congress, perform a healthy role: “At these agencies, scientific merit is judged almost entirely by the community itself, but Congress ultimately ensures that the public good is paramount.”  No such policing comes with Prop. 71, however, and the money trail looks too tempting:Proposition 71, in contrast, would introduce a new model for the support of scientific research at the state level that would rely on mere transparency as a guarantee against abuse.  Although public meetings are promised, the oversight committee would consist mainly of people with close ties to the universities, institutes and companies that stand to benefit from the money spent.  Most of the rest are representatives of disease groups.  The committee makes the ultimate funding decisions and will be allowed to modify NIH rules of informed consent and human-subject protection as it sees fit.    The advocacy of such people as the actor Christopher Reeve – whose untimely death this week deprives biomedical research of one of its most forceful and effective lobbyists – has helped to elevate the promise of embryonic-stem-cell research, sometimes to unrealistic levels.  It is up to the people of California whether they want to approve Proposition 71.  But if they do, researchers must strive to ensure that no funds will be abused, and they must give full consideration to a wide array of ethical concerns.  Anything less risks damaging public trust in science.Yet how effective can self-policing by researchers be, when the temptations for grant money, prizes and lucrative pharmaceutical contracts threaten to make ethics take a back seat?  This was the subject of the editorials this week in Nature1 and Science3 about feeble first attempts in Washington to decide what is right or wrong.  The lack of clear guidelines on stem cell research occasioned the question about human brain cells in mice: how would anyone know?  If the researcher feels he has to experiment with chimeras (see BreakPoint commentary) to find a cure, on what basis will the scientific community claim it is unethical, and how could they stop it?    Erika Check wrote about prominent biologists debating such questions just in the last few days at the US National Academies, now that California’s Prop. 71 is already on the ballot and appears poised for an easy win, especially since the state’s popular governor, Arnold Schwarzenegger, has endorsed it along with Michael J. Fox and other celebrities.  Since no clear guidelines exist, and no federal policies have the force of law, the scientists have a free rein to create their own consensus about what is ethical.  The vacuum has allowed some already to charge ahead into areas that are blurring the line between human and animal:Researchers at the meeting agreed on a lot: that the use of human embryonic stem cells to produce a baby should be banned, for example, and that stem-cell researchers should adopt guidelines to reassure the public that their work is ethically sound.  But they differed on how to handle chimaeras, which mix cells and DNA from different species….    Scientists could even construct a mouse whose entire brain was made of human-derived cells….The article quotes Irving Weissman of Stanford who is already creating human-mouse chimeras with private funds.  Weissman claims the “yuck factor” is no reason to ban such research.  The fact that the government so far has not taken the lead in establishing guidelines puts the burden on the scientists themselves, but is this the fox guarding the henhouse?  “That leaves a hole for scientists, who are not sure what the law permits them to do, and lack guidance on their work’s impact on public opinion.”  How, then, can they “reassure the public that their work is ethically sound?”    Speaking for Science,3 Constance Holden provided more details on the meeting of scientists last week in Washington, DC.  The scientists seemed to agree on little more than the need for guidelines.  They admitted that there is no clear distinction between “stem cell research” and “cloning” even among biotech investors, though the public is usually reassured that cloning is bad.  And they could not answer such basic questions as, “what does it mean to accord an early embryo ‘respect’?”  It didn’t help to hear a legal expert confide, “much assisted reproduction is human experimentation in the name of treatment.”  The potential for deceiving a gullible public appears more powerful than ethical concerns, especially from the so-called religious right (see 09/27/2004 headline). EurekAlert reported that the UN is also considering talks about the ethics of therapeutic cloning, as ES stem cell research is called.  Dr. Gerald Schatten (U. of Pittsburgh) argues research first, ethics later as he admits that ES stem cells have no track record: “Will therapeutic cloning create immune matching?  It’s unclear.  At this point, we don’t even know if human embryonic stem cells are safe, let alone effective.  What’s important is that research be allowed to continue so we can find out.”    The bottom line: the race toward this potentially lucrative technology by states and other countries seems to be outpacing concerns about ethics, even though there is no evidence ES stem cells will cure anything (while adult stem cells already have plenty).  Now that they are on the verge of getting their way, the scientists are having one last twinge of conscience before charging full steam ahead.1Erica Check, “Biologists seek consensus on guidelines for stem-cell research,” Nature 431, 885 (21 October 2004); doi:10.1038/431885a.2Editorials: “California dreaming,” Nature 431, 723 (14 October 2004); doi:10.1038/431723a3Constance Holden, “Bioethics: Stem Cell Researchers Mull Ideas for Self-Regulation,” Science, Vol 306, Issue 5696, 586, 22 October 2004, [DOI: 10.1126/science.306.5696.586].If anyone should have a voice in the ethics of stem cell research, it should be Joni Eareckson Tada, the advocate for the disabled who has spent the last 37 years in a wheelchair herself.  She has done far more than the TV celebrities to help the afflicted.  Her organization “Joni and Friends” has supplied over 25,000 wheelchairs to the disabled poor in Africa and other third world countries.  Moreover, she could certainly be expected to look with hope over any therapies that might allow her to walk again.  Yet she remains a staunch opponent of embryonic stem cell research, for good reasons, as explained on the bioethics page of her website JoniAndFrends.org.    Joni has appeared on radio talk shows and TV interviews, such as in a debate last week on Faith Under Fire.  The clarity of her logic is unimpeachable.  Yet it is unlikely that she can overcome the tear-jerking, emotional commercials by celebrity actors that tug at the heartstrings with empty promises that embryonic stem cells might cure your grandmother of Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease, despite no track record and many problems (while adult stem cells are flourishing: for another example, see EurekAlert report this week about skin cells fighting brain tumors).  Meanwhile, beneficiaries of Prop. 71 stand to make a killing on taxpayer funds.  Follow the money trail: why don’t private investors support ES stem cell research?  Yet the taxpayers are going to have to foot the bill for a possible boondoggle that may take decades to show any results– maybe never, while a class of human beings will be created to be destroyed for scientific research (a good time to re-read John Durkin’s letter; see 09/03/2004 headline).  Since California voters never seem to find a bond issue they didn’t like, even when living in a state climbing out of near bankruptcy, the world is staged to see the next chapter in our brave new world opening on November 2.  Maybe the scientists will figure out how to be “ethical” while they’re laughing on the way to the bank.(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Oxford and UCT: oldest universities working together for new solutions

first_imgThe Universities of Cape Town and Oxford, each the oldest universities in their countries, have long been partners in research to find innovative solutions to the problems of today, and the future. This was highlighted during a recent visit to UCT by a high-level delegation from the prestigious English university. An aerial view of Oxford University in the UK. South Africa’s University of Cape Town collaborates more with Oxford than with any other British university. (Image: Oxford University) • Long walk to university reaps the reward • Bokoko literacy project brings books and libraries to Africa • South Africa’s Smart Schools showcased on Brand South Africa media tour • New technologies stand to benefit poorer countries • Clinton fund invests in Africa’s girls Staff writerEffective collaboration between universities cannot be imposed from the top down: it must be led by research. This was the message Oxford University vice-chancellor Andrew Hamilton and his senior researchers brought to South Africa’s University of Cape Town last week.The two are the oldest universities in their countries. There is evidence of education at Oxford going back to 1096, nearly 1 000 years ago, making it the oldest functioning university in the English-speaking world and the third-oldest on the planet, after Morocco’s University of Karueein and Italy’s University of Bologna. UCT was founded in 1829 and is not only the oldest university in South Africa but the second-oldest in Africa.The close relationship between the two institutions has created a range of research projects with the potential for tremendous social impact, UCT vice-chancellor Max Price said during the visit. These include research partnerships in malaria drug resistance, new tuberculosis vaccines, food security, and constitutional and customary law in Africa.Oxford’s Hamilton said South Africa was a good place to look into topical global problems. “Collaborations thrive when there is mutual need, and South Africa offers a unique environment to study some of the greatest challenges facing us today,” he said. “We need now to encourage collaboration where it does not yet exist.”UCT works and publishes with Oxford more than with any other British university. Their partnership in neurosciences is one of the most fruitful.“We are particularly pleased that the launch of UCT’s Neurosciences Initiative coincides with this week’s visit by the University of Oxford,” Price said.UCT’s Neurosciences Initiative at the Groote Schuur academic hospital brings together clinicians and researchers from a range of specialities, fostering collaboration in the treatment of a neurological disorders such as stroke, central nervous system infection and trauma.The initiative is led by Prof Graham Fieggen, UCT’s head of neurosurgery. “The majority of people suffering from common neurological disorders live in low and middle-income countries,” he said. “There is a need to understand these disorders within the context of our own continent. We cannot simply import models from the global North.”Oxford professor of neuroscience and co-director of the university’s Centre for Neuromuscular Science, Matthew Wood, who is also a UCT graduate and honorary professor, said neuroscience is central to society.“Neurosciences are much broader than simply understanding the brain or understanding neurological disease,” he said. “Essentially it goes to the heart of who we are as human beings, and to many of the challenges that exist in society.”Oxford vice-chancellor Andrew Hamilton and UCT vice-chancellor Max Price during the former’s visit to South Africa last week. (Image: UCT)Managing chronic diseases over the phoneOne of the projects showcased during the Oxford visit was the development of mobile phone technology allowing people in Africa to manage chronic diseases such as high blood pressure by themselves. Named the SMS-text Adherence Support, or Star, trial, it is part of mobile health development in Africa, and a collaboration between Oxford’s Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Primary Care Health Sciences and UCT’s Chronic Diseases Initiative for Africa (CDIA) project.Mobile phones are highly effective in reaching patients across Africa. In a recent trial of an intervention to improve blood pressure control, over 95% of patients getting educational and supportive SMSes remained in contact with the project over one year.The collaboration involved Oxford professor of general practice Andrew Farmer, professor of electrical engineering Lionel Tarassenko and David Springer of the Oxford Institute of Biomedical Engineering. UCT researchers included head of medicine Prof Bongani Mayosi, as well as head of the diabetic medicine and endocrinology Prof Naomi Levitt, director of UCT’s Chronic Diseases Initiative for Africa, and the CDIA’s Dr Kirsty Bobrow.Largest community-based study among HIV-positive teenagersAnother project looks for insights into the behaviour of South Africa’s 1.2-million HIV-positive teenagers, to understand why their adherence to anti-retroviral treatment is low, and their use of contraceptives inconsistent.The project, called Mzantsi Wakho, aims to get HIV-positive adolescents to adhere to antiretroviral treatment and access sexual and reproductive health services. It is the largest community-based study of HIV-positive teenagers ever conducted. From preliminary results, stigma still plays a powerful role in stopping teenagers from disclosing their HIV status to their partners.Mzantsi Wakho is led by UCT’s Dr Rebecca Hodes, the director of the Aids and Society Research Unit at the Centre for Social Science Research and an honorary research fellow at UCT’s Department of Historical Studies, and Lucie Cluver, an associate professor of evidence-based social intervention at Oxford and honorary lecturer in UCT’s Division of Neuropsychiatry. The Departments of Health, Social Development, Basic Education and Women, Children and People with Disabilities were consulted on the project’s research design.Controversy over Cecil John Rhodes statueDuring the visit, Oxford vice-chancellor Hamilton added his voice to the debate on removing the statue of arch-colonialist and English mining magnate Cecil John Rhodes from the grounds of UCT.“It’s a debate that should take place,” he told Primedia radio’s Kieno Kammies on Cape Talk. “It’s a debate for the students and faculty of the University of Cape Town – and South Africa in general – to go through, to work out for yourselves what place this figure who did many really quite terrible things during his lifetime.”Oxford University administers the Rhodes Trust, a scholarship programme Rhodes set up to allow promising students from the former British Empire to study at his alma mater.University of Cape Town students protesting for the removal of the statue of Cecil John Rhodes from its prominent position on the university’s grounds. (Image: UCT)“Universities are an ideal place – they are an appropriate place – for that debate to take place,” Hamilton said. “Universities should be about the free flow of ideas, of strong, robust, even sometimes contentious debate about the interpretation of history, about the role of history in the development of modern society.”But, Harrison added, “it’s not for me to comment on the place of Rhodes in contemporary South Africa”.While his Oxford counterpart stayed neutral on the issue, UCT vice chancellor Price said the statue should be removed, as he felt the anguish it caused black students.“I feel the need to apologise on behalf of the university for the kind of pain they’re experiencing for that frustration,” he told Eyewitness News.Edited by Mary Alexanderlast_img read more

10 months agoOrigi reluctant as Liverpool say he can leave

first_imgOrigi reluctant as Liverpool say he can leaveby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool have informed Divock Origi he can leave in January.HLN says the Belgium striker has been told he can find himself a new club. However, Origi doesn’t want to leave.The forward believes he can still find a place in manager Jurgen Klopp’s plans, though also is reluctant to take a pay-cut to leave.Origi was celebrated last month by Reds fans after scoring the winner against Everton.The departure of Dominic Solanke to Crystal Palace on-loan has strengthened Origi’s chances of playing more at Liverpool this season.And he has told his agents he’d prefer to stay until making a definitive decision in June. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

9 months agoSevilla coach Machin: Munir wants to be in the front line

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Sevilla coach Machin: Munir wants to be in the front lineby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveSevilla coach Pablo Machin has welcomed their deal for former Barcelona striker Munir El Haddadi.Sevilla swooped for Munir last week.Machin said, “He will bring above all competitiveness. He is a good recruit. Not only for the present, but also for the future. “Many clubs wanted him too and he chose Sevilla FC. He does not want to be in the background, but in the front line. Sevilla is an ideal club for him. “We will try to lead him to his best level.” last_img

The Bachelorette’s Jordan Rodgers Says His Relationship With Aaron Rodgers Is “Complicated”

first_imgA closeup of Aaron Rodgers in his Green Bay Packers helmetMINNEAPOLIS, MN – OCTOBER 15: Aaron Rodgers #12 of the Green Bay Packers warms up before a game against the Minnesota Vikings on October 15, 2017 at US Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota. (Photo by Hannah Foslien/Getty Images)Aaron Rodgers is currently the second-most famous person in his family among women aged 18 to 34. The Green Bay Packers’ quarterback’s little brother, Jordan Rodgers, is currently starring on The Bachelorette. The two brothers don’t appear to be best friends, though. Jordan Rodgers appeared on Katie Nolan’s Garbage Time podcast and discussed his relationship with Aaron. (Starts at about the 23:00 mark)From the podcast:“How close would you say you are with Aaron?” Nolan asks. “Um, I, you know, we have, we have a relationship,” Jordan says “We, you know, it’s, ah, it’s, ah … it’s complicated. I’ll say that.”“Are you a Packers fan?” Nolan asks.“Yeah,” Jordan says. “So, one of my best friends in the world, David Bakhtiari, is his left tackle.”That’s…an interesting answer, to say the least.What’s going on with the Rodgers’ brothers?[FTW]last_img read more

Golden Age Home gets Generator

first_imgThe Ministry of Labour and Social Security has collaborated with the Golden Age Home (GAH) in Vineyard Town, Kingston, to procure a generator  for the home.General Manager of the Home, Laurette Adams-Thomas, told JIS News that the generator has helped to alleviate some challenges that the institution encounters once there  is a power outage.“The residents would be in total darkness and we would have to use lanterns and flashlights,” Mrs. Thomas said.Prior to the acquisition of the generator, power outages would result in spoilage of perishable foods stored in the cold room and also affect the timely operation of the home’s laundry department.“The laundry room staff would sometimes have to hand-wash for the residents and this would result in the accumulation of  clothing, due to the amount to be washed.  This would affect the staff’s ability to provide clean bed linen and clothing, which are needed on a daily basis,” Mrs. Thomas explained.Mrs. Thomas lauded the GAH staff for the instrumental work being done over the years in caring for the residents and ensuring the smooth operations of the facility.She said corporate Jamaica, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), Faith- based institutions and private donors have assisted the home with acquiring other well-needed items. However, the home is still in need of equipment, including an industrial heater, which costs approximately $2 million. The dryer will assist the home to provide clean bed linen and clothes in a timely manner for the 454 residents.“I am not daunted by the challenges we encounter at the Golden Age Home, because I am motivated by challenges. I have a passion for caring for the elderly and I know that the Ministry Labour and Social Security, the Board of Directors, Management and Staff are doing their best to ensure that the Home is the benchmark infirmary in Jamaica,”  she told JIS News. By Shelly Ann-Irving/Sanasha Pearson, JIS Reporterslast_img read more

Jamaica and China Sign Aquatic Exports MoU

first_imgThe Ministry of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries (MICAF) has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine Department (AQSIQ) of the People’s Republic of China to export Jamaican aquatic products to the Chinese market.The MoU was signed by Portfolio Minister, Hon. Karl Samuda; Permanent Secretary in the Ministry, Donovan Stanberry; Minister of the AQSIQ, His Excellency Zhi Shuping; and Chinese Ambassador to Jamaica, His Excellency Niu Qingbao, at the Knutsford Court Hotel in New Kingston on Friday, September 22.The Ministry and AQSIQ have agreed to cooperate regarding the export of lobsters and conch in the first instance and, thereafter, other aquatic products with a view to expeditiously establishing an effective and mutually beneficial trade relationship.Mr. Samuda said the MoU will provide a grand opportunity for Jamaica to enter into another business arrangement with a Chinese agency. He noted that this will “open new opportunities for trade with China in the fisheries sector.”He gave the assurance that aquatic products of the highest quality will be exported to China.Noting that Jamaica is governed by global agencies and regulations such as the Codex Alimentarius Commission, World Organization for Animal Health and International Plant Protection Convention, he said country is “unequivocally committed” to the highest principles of food safety and the international standards and agreements to which the island is a signatory.“The MoU we sign has three main objectives: to prevent the entry and spread of pests and epidemic diseases of animals and plants into one country from the other; to protect from disease, the production of agriculture, forestry, animal husbandry and fishery resources; and to strengthen bilateral exchange and cooperation in the field of the entry and exit of animal and plant inspection and quarantine,” the Minister outlined.In this regard, Mr. Samuda said the plan of action to be pursued will include establishing prerequisite conditions under which Jamaica can export fisheries products into China, in accordance with international regulations governing the trade of food.Mr. Shuping, in his address, said the arrangement represented China’s gift to Jamaica in commemoration of its 55th year of Independence.“The signing of this document is (indicative) that Jamaica is equally able to export to China,” Mr. Shuping stated, adding that both countries remained “good friends.”Rainforest Seafoods and B & D Trawling Limited are the first two companies that will export products to China under the agreement.Director of Marketing and Corporate Affairs, Rainforest Seafoods, Roger Lyn, said his company is raring to go.“We’re very excited about this new MoU that the Ministry has signed…between the Government of Jamaica and the Government of China. Currently, we are already exporting live lobster to the region and whole lobster and tails. We’re looking forward with this new development with China, which is a big market, to see growth. We expect our numbers to double regarding export, which can only be good for the country,” Mr. Lyn told JIS News.Chief Executive Officer, B & D Trawling Limited, Roderick Francis, shared similar sentiments.“What this will do is open up access for Jamaicans to ship live lobsters to the second largest market in the world and eventually open up to other products in agriculture which is great for Jamaica on a whole. This first step is really big for Jamaica,” he saidlast_img read more

Fredriksen Others in for Up to 9 Newcastlemaxes at Bohai

first_imgzoom Chinese shipbuilder Bohai Shipbuilding Heavy Industries has received an order for up to nine Newcastlemaxes, according to broker reports.John Fredriksen Group has been tied to an order for up to four 208,000 dwt bulkers at the yard, comprising two firm and two optional ships, Compass Maritime said in a weekly report.The ships are scheduled for delivery in the fourth quarter of 2019, Asiasis said referring to the order.Berge Bulk has also been linked to an order for up to four Newcastlemaxes, also two firm plus two optional vessels.The ships are said to be slated for delivery in the first half of 2020.The company is yet to provide World Maritime News with a comment on the matter.Finally, Singapore’s RGL Shipping has reportedly placed an order for one Newcastlemax, to be delivered to the company in the first half of 2020.The bulkers will be built in accordance with the NOx IMO Tier II emission standards and are priced at around USD 45 million respectively, as disclosed by Compass Maritime.RGL Shipping and Berge Bulk have already had ships built by Bohai.Based on the data provided by VesselsValue, Bohai delivered one Capesize bulker to Berge Bulk in 2017, the Berge Grossglockner, and is going to deliver another Capesize to the company this year, the Berge Olympus.RGL Shipping is also set to take delivery of a Capesize newbuilding from the yard this year, the 210,000 dwt PSU Third.Both ships are expected to be delivered to their respective owners in January.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more