3Dprinted transparent skull lets scientists see a mouse brain work

first_img Share your voice What it feels like to kill 563 mice for science Scientists connect a human brain and ‘rat cyborg’ brain together Rodent experiments The See-Shell could aid scientists studying human brain conditions like concussions, Alzheimer’s and degenerative conditions like Parkinson’s disease. “These are studies we couldn’t do in humans, but they are extremely important in our understanding of how the brain works so we can improve treatments for people who experience brain injuries or diseases,” says neuroscientist Timothy Ebner. Post a comment Researchers at the University of Minnesota have figured out how to open a window into the brains of mice by using a transparent skull implant. It’s called the See-Shell.  “What we are trying to do is to see if we can visualize and interact with large parts of the mouse brain surface, called the cortex, over long periods of time,” says mechanical engineering professor Suhasa Kodandaramaiah, co-author of a study on the See-Shell that appeared in the journal Nature Communications on Tuesday.  A spider’s erection, and other cool things trapped in ambercenter_img A video released by the university shows a sped-up mouse brain scan as seen through the See-Shell. “Changes in brightness correspond to waxing and waning of neural activity. Subtle flashes are periods when the whole brain suddenly becomes active,” the school notes.The researchers digitally scan a mouse’s skull and use the data to create a matching transparent piece using a 3D printer. The skull is then surgically replaced with the See-Shell. The mouse studied by the team did not reject the implant, which allowed them to monitor its brain over several months. The researchers intend to make the See-Shell commercially available to other researchers. 20 Photos Sci-Tech Tags 0last_img read more

Inside the farm of the future

first_img Tags Tech Industry Mobile 3:02 0 Microsoft’s FarmBeats program uses the company’s Azure cloud to connect agricultural devices and generate data intended to help farms operate more efficiently. Sensors embedded in the soil use the cloud to communicate with drones that circle farms to direct irrigation patterns and herbicide distribution and to optimize the harvesting of crops. CNET visited Microsoft’s Cloud Collaboration Center in Redmond, Washington, to learn more about how the cloud, AI and the internet of things (IoT) are transforming business.”We use machine learning and image recognition to understand how our crops are growing,” said Jason Zander, executive vice president of Microsoft Azure. “Today a lot of irrigation systems … just kind of throw water everywhere. Being able to leverage drones and some of these sensors means we save water and get better production out of [farms].”The cloud is evolving rapidly, said Zander. “A decade ago the cloud helped mobile phones become ubiquitous. Today, the cloud becomes really powerful when it helps other emerging technologies like AI and IoT. It’s exciting because we can help entire [business] sectors quickly become more efficient.” Now playing: Watch this: Artificial intelligence (AI) Drones Cloud computing Microsoft Share your voice Post a comment The farm of the future is in the cloud Your next salad might be grown in the cloud and served with a side of artificial intelligence.Cloud computing, a technology that relies on clustered servers positioned across the globe, supports everything from drones to machine learning and the smart home. Using cloud tech, farms are about to become a lot smarter as well.last_img read more

Full Show We Share Information For A Good Nights Sleep Aug 7

first_imgOn Monday’s Houston Matters: It could be the most important public service we provide on Houston Matters: We help out you and other Houstonians to get something we all desperately need: a good night’s sleep.We welcome your questions about sleep and sleep disorders for Dr. Richard Castriotta, the director of pulmonary and sleep medicine at UTHealth’s McGovern Medical School, and the medical director of the Memorial Hermann Sleep Disorders Center.Also this hour, We discuss developments in Houston sports with Jeff Balke, who writes for Houston Press and Houstonia Magazine.Houston Matters offers a free daily, downloadable podcast here, on iTunes, Stitcher and various other podcasting apps. Sharelast_img read more

Video goes viral of guards dragging bumped passenger off United flight

first_img Posted by << Previous PostNext Post >> Monday, April 10, 2017 CHICAGO — Three security officials dragged a passenger from a United Airlines flight at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport when the man reportedly refused to leave his seat after being asked to deplane because the flight was overbooked.A statement from United says “Flight 3411 from Chicago to Louisville was overbooked. After our team looked for volunteers, one customer refused to leave the aircraft voluntarily and law enforcement was asked to come to the gate.”United said it apologized “for the overbook situation.”One passenger posted the video on Facebook. It shows the guards grabbing then dragging the passenger down the aisle. Screaming is heard and other passengers say “Oh my God” and “Look at what you did to him.”United said airline representatives chose four passengers at random when no volunteers agreed to leave the overbooked flight. They requested law enforcement assistance when one of them refused to leave.The passenger who posted the video said United asked for four passengers to relinquish their seats for airline employees on stand-by. Travelweek Group center_img Share Tags: United Airlines Video goes viral of guards dragging bumped passenger off United flightlast_img read more