High winds are making this a difficult fire to fig

first_imgHigh winds are making this a difficult fire to fight. Airtankers and Helicopters are lifting water into the area.  You can read the latest on the A fire ban is in effect for all of Arizona with the following prohibited:    •    All open fires and campfires.    •    Other types of outdoor fires that produce open flames such as lamp oil in tiki lamps.    •    Fireworks and other pyrotechnic displays.    •    Outdoor use of equipment that generates open flames or a spark. This restricts the use of welding equipment and chain saws.     •    Campfires, charcoal grills, and stove fires (wood, charcoal, and coal burning) are prohibited on all Prescott National Forest lands, roads, and trails; except within developed recreation sites where grills and campfire rings are provided (Pressurized liquid or gas stoves, lanterns and heaters meeting safety specifications are allowed).    •    Smoking is prohibited except within enclosed vehicles, buildings, or developed recreation sites where the area is cleared of all flammable material.    •    Campfires are not allowed at the designated dispersed sites within the Prescott Basin.  Metal posts identify designated dispersed sites with a number.[photo taken Thursday afternoon] The local Highschool in SpringValley has been turned into a staging area for the fire crews, Driving by yesterday afternoon, the Highschool grounds are a hive of activity, with trailers and tents on the football and the baseball field.[photo taken by Charles Wicker Wednesday evening] May 18, 2012The sky due west from Arcosanti is filled with ominous smoke from what is called the ‘Gladiator Fire’. The fire started on Sunday, May 13. in Crown King, a small town on top of the Bradshaw Mountains about 30 miles from Arcosanti. It quickly spread and has now burned over 6000 acres. [photo taken Wednesday afternoon]center_img Expect smoke in the area.  Smoke sensitive individuals in affected areas may need to take action to mitigate the conditions.  Remaining indoors, using air conditioning or temporarily moving to an unaffected area may be necessary. Visibility is an excellent measure of air quality.  If visibility is ten miles or more, the air quality is good.  Visibility of six to nine miles indicates moderate air quality.  Three to five miles of visibility indicates conditions unhealthy for sensitive groups.  One and a half to two and a half miles, the air quality is unhealthy.  One to one and a quarter miles indicates the air quality is very unhealthy.  If visibility due to smoke is less than a mile, the air quality is hazardous.  For more smoke information and air quality forecasts, visit azfireinfo.[photo taken Thursday evening]last_img read more

House committee considers bipartisan pension tax relief for surviving spouses

first_img Categories: Glenn News 06Mar House committee considers bipartisan pension tax relief for surviving spouses Rep. Glenn cosponsors Democratic lawmaker’s billLansing — Surviving spouses will not be subject to a pension tax increase as a result of the loss of their loved one under bipartisan legislation considered Wednesday in the House Tax Policy Committee.State Rep. Gary Glenn, R-Midland, an original co-sponsor of Rep. Jim Townsend’s House Bill 4124, said the bipartisan effort to update Michigan’s pension tax exemption so widowed spouses remain eligible demonstrated the issue’s importance.“Surely this is something everyone can agree on, that a grieving spouse shouldn’t be further burdened with a tax increase triggered by the death of their loved one,” Rep. Glenn said. “I did not support the new pension tax to begin with, but until we can repeal it in full, this is at least a step back in the right direction.”Under current law, the age of the oldest spouse determines the tax category that applies to the pension and retirement benefits of both spouses. If the older spouse passes away first, the surviving spouse could experience a tax increase on retirement income.The legislation ensures that surviving spouses continue to receive the same tax rate, limitations and restrictions so long as they have filed a joint tax return in the past with their spouse and have not remarried during the tax year in which they file.During his presentation, Townsend, D-Royal Oak, thanked Rep. Glenn for cosponsoring the legislation and said he is proud to have Glenn’s support.The bill is expected to be approved by the committee next week and go to the full House for consideration.last_img read more

Rep Hughes memorializes fallen police officer during ceremony

first_img07Sep Rep. Hughes memorializes fallen police officer during ceremony State Rep. Holly Hughes today during a Sept. 11 ceremony in the Capitol honored a fallen Norton Shores police officer who died in the line of duty.Hughes, of Montague, read the name of Norton Shores Police Officer Jonathan Ginka, who died May 10 in a vehicle accident.“Officer Ginka served his community well, first as a member of the North Muskegon Fire Department and then as a law enforcement officer. He was the epitome of a selfless public servant,” Hughes said. “I hope honoring him in our annual ceremony will bring comfort to his family.”Hughes said the House began its Sept. 11 ceremony in 2011 to honor Michigan’s first responders and members of the military who died in the line of duty.“We honor these men and women who are heroes to us all for the selfless dedication they have to their communities and their nation,” Hughes said. “Just like the first responders and military members who rushed into the World Trade Center and Pentagon on that horrific day in 2011, these local heroes rush to the aid of people in their communities or defense of their nation.”PHOTO INFORMATION: State Rep. Holly Hughes, of Montague, today was joined by Norton Shores Police Chief John Gale and Lt. Michael Kasher as her guests for the Michigan House’s annual Sept. 11 Memorial Service at the Capitol. The ceremony remembers first responders and members of the military from Michigan who died in the line of duty in the past year. Categories: Hughes News,Newslast_img read more

Rep Maturen New state budget saves taxpayers money while improving roads public

first_img21Jun Rep. Maturen: New state budget saves taxpayers money while improving roads, public safety Categories: News Governor signs one of two main budget billsState Rep. David Maturen joins Gov. Rick Snyder and legislative colleagues for a bill-signing ceremony today.State Rep. David Maturen today said the newly signed state budget plan reins in government spending while investing in top priorities such as road repairs, public safety and health care.“I’m pleased we were able to come up with a spending plan that respects Michigan’s hardworking taxpayers,” Maturen said after attending a bill-signing ceremony with Gov. Rick Snyder and legislative colleagues. “The new budget increases investments in the programs that matter most while making our state government more efficient, effective and accountable and spending less money than the previously enacted budget.”The governor today signed Senate Bill 848, a budget bill covering multiple state departments and agencies. A separate bill that provides funding for K-12 schools and higher education remains under consideration.Highlights of the legislation signed today include:Savings for taxpayers and smart financial planning. Spending from a fund that covers multiple state departments and agencies – called the general fund – is projected to be less next budget year than during the current year. A prison will be closed and budgets for several state departments will decline as state government becomes more efficient and eliminates waste. Maturen noted the new budget pays down debt and puts more money into the state’s main savings account, key steps that will continue to reduce the burden on Michigan’s hard-working taxpayers in the future.Road repairs. The state continues to accelerate its timeline for reconstructing roads and bridges with a record-high $4 billion investment. State-level funding will be $1 billion higher than just a few years ago, with more measures to make sure projects are done on time and on budget with strengthened warranties.Public safety. The bill signed today includes grants to make school buildings safer across the state and also expands Michigan’s OK2SAY confidential tip reporting program. The plan funds training for 155 new Michigan State Police troopers.Health care. More resources will fight the opioid abuse crisis and boost community mental health services.Maturen, of Vicksburg, played a key role in retaining funding for the Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program after its previous funding source was eliminated. The program supports volunteers who monitor water quality in local lakes and document changes in lake quality. A number of local lakes, including Gull Lake, Indian Lake, Little Long Lake, Barton Lake, West Lake and Duck Lake, participate in the program.“The Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program plays a vital role in training and assisting volunteers to ensure that reliable water quality data is available,” Maturen said. “The information they provide helps shape management plans that protect our lakes and ensure our kids and grandkids will be able to enjoy Michigan’s natural resources long into the future.”###last_img read more