High winds are making this a difficult fire to fig

first_imgHigh winds are making this a difficult fire to fight. Airtankers and Helicopters are lifting water into the area.  You can read the latest on the A fire ban is in effect for all of Arizona with the following prohibited:    •    All open fires and campfires.    •    Other types of outdoor fires that produce open flames such as lamp oil in tiki lamps.    •    Fireworks and other pyrotechnic displays.    •    Outdoor use of equipment that generates open flames or a spark. This restricts the use of welding equipment and chain saws.     •    Campfires, charcoal grills, and stove fires (wood, charcoal, and coal burning) are prohibited on all Prescott National Forest lands, roads, and trails; except within developed recreation sites where grills and campfire rings are provided (Pressurized liquid or gas stoves, lanterns and heaters meeting safety specifications are allowed).    •    Smoking is prohibited except within enclosed vehicles, buildings, or developed recreation sites where the area is cleared of all flammable material.    •    Campfires are not allowed at the designated dispersed sites within the Prescott Basin.  Metal posts identify designated dispersed sites with a number.[photo taken Thursday afternoon] The local Highschool in SpringValley has been turned into a staging area for the fire crews, Driving by yesterday afternoon, the Highschool grounds are a hive of activity, with trailers and tents on the football and the baseball field.[photo taken by Charles Wicker Wednesday evening] May 18, 2012The sky due west from Arcosanti is filled with ominous smoke from what is called the ‘Gladiator Fire’. The fire started on Sunday, May 13. in Crown King, a small town on top of the Bradshaw Mountains about 30 miles from Arcosanti. It quickly spread and has now burned over 6000 acres. [photo taken Wednesday afternoon]center_img Expect smoke in the area.  Smoke sensitive individuals in affected areas may need to take action to mitigate the conditions.  Remaining indoors, using air conditioning or temporarily moving to an unaffected area may be necessary. Visibility is an excellent measure of air quality.  If visibility is ten miles or more, the air quality is good.  Visibility of six to nine miles indicates moderate air quality.  Three to five miles of visibility indicates conditions unhealthy for sensitive groups.  One and a half to two and a half miles, the air quality is unhealthy.  One to one and a quarter miles indicates the air quality is very unhealthy.  If visibility due to smoke is less than a mile, the air quality is hazardous.  For more smoke information and air quality forecasts, visit azfireinfo.[photo taken Thursday evening]last_img read more

One of the biggest miners unions in South Africa

first_imgOne of the biggest miners’ unions in South Africa is demanding doubled wages. The threat is for a massive strike like the one that had a big impact on platinum supply last year. Some gold bugs are hopeful this would boost the price of gold. Maybe even just the threat could give us a nice tailwind. Not so fast. Remember that while South Africa is the world’s top platinum producer, it lost that status for gold years ago. More important is that platinum is consumed as an industrial metal. Most of the gold ever mined is still within easy reach and in purified form, as bullion or jewelry. The potential supply of “recycled” gold is practically infinite, compared to the market. This makes mine supply a less important factor in the price of gold than it is for any other metal. For gold, it’s all about demand. That’s why we call it a “fear barometer.” As long as fear and chaos abound in global markets, demand will keep gold in high demand—and prices up. Place your bets accordingly.last_img read more

Justin So the ingredients for a holy war have al

first_img Justin: So, the ingredients for a holy war have always been there? Doug: Yes. Up to about 100 years ago, Christians felt a moral obligation to convert everyone, including other misguided Christians. Now it’s mostly just the Muslims who feel that way. It’s entirely possible, even likely, we’re going to have an outright war of religion. Although, in the highly Politically Correct West, it will have to be called something else. The ongoing invasion of Europe by Muslims is one aspect of it—although that’s not so much a religious thing per se. That’s partly because the Muslims are migrating mostly for economic reasons. And because religion is a dead duck in Europe today. Europe is a post-Christian society. Very few people go to church or take Christianity seriously in Europe, it’s a very secular society. Which is a bit of a problem, because they’ve taken the State for their new god. But the State doesn’t promise anybody an afterlife. So, in my opinion, Europeans are actually ripe for conversion to Islam. It’s a serious problem, because Islam is incompatible with, and antithetical to Western Civilization. Justin: Why should the average American care about this?  Doug: It’s part of the gradual destruction of Western culture. Lots of termites—including socialism, cultural Marxism, gender warfare—have been eating away at the foundations of Western Civilization for decades. Islam, in itself, isn’t a real threat. The Koran, which PC types love to treat with respect, is just poorly written medieval sci-fi. It’s living proof that humans are capable of believing absolutely anything. That said, Islam is a threat to the West because tens of millions of migrants are being invited to come and live at the expense of the current residents. Europe will collapse from within, as did Rome. The average European believes in nothing—except that his civilization not only isn’t worthy, but is actually evil. No wonder the migrants treat them with contempt. The Mohammedans—although I’ll note it’s now very un-PC to call them that—are technologically and economically backward. As long as they put the Koran at the center of their lives—and they have to, because it is the direct, incontrovertible word of Allah—they’ll remain backward. If, through an accident of geology, there wasn’t a lot of low cost oil in places they live, the West would have no reason to care what they think, say, or do. They’d be no more than an interesting tourist attraction. The good news is that, over the next 100 years, most Muslims will fall away from their primitive beliefs. But that’s another story… And a lot is going to happen in the meantime. Recommended Link These insiders are all quietly backing what The Economist calls “one of the world’s hottest investments.” Already, some of these plays have climbed an extraordinary 1,442% in 5 months… 503% in 30 days… 1,696% in 10 days. If you feel like you’ve missed out on this bull market, then watch this video. Recommended Link Justin: Doug, I know you think the European Union (EU) has been destined to fail from the start. Could religious tensions spark this inevitable crisis? Or will an economic or financial crisis be the final nail in the EU’s coffin? Doug: Religion is definitely playing into the crisis. Because you have to remember that, in continental Europe, Kosovo, Albania, and Turkey, are already Muslim, as are parts of Bulgaria. 10% of Western Europe is already Muslim. There are about 20 million Muslims in southern Russia, and that’s going to be a big problem for Moscow. There’s always blowback from running an empire, something the French and British have found as well. And Americans are discovering. Enemy sympathizers are already within the gates. London is turning into Karachi, Paris into Kinshasa, and Rome into Lagos. I wouldn’t doubt that there’s going to be a war against Islam. Even though, as I said, very few Europeans take Christianity seriously anymore. Islam, however, is much more virulent than Christianity—it’s like Christianity in the Middle Ages. Even if the average Muslim is basically “get along go along” with his religion in daily life, when push comes to shove, yeah, he takes his religion quite seriously—the way Christians did hundreds of years ago. So this is very serious. It’s a cultural war, much more than an economic or military one. And I’m afraid the West has already about lost it. It’s really tragic, because almost everything good in the world has come out of the West—in particular freedom, capitalism, individualism, science, technology, literature. Future generations will miss them. It’s sad. Justin: Doug, thank you for sharing your thoughts with us. Doug: Sure, anytime. Editor’s note: Every month, Doug shares his unique insights in The Casey Report, our flagship publication. If you sign up today, you’ll get complete access to all of our archived content, including recent essays by Doug on the Greater Depression, the migrant crisis, and technology. You’ll also receive specific, actionable advice to help you protect and grow your personal financial empire. You can sign up for a risk-free trial of The Casey Report right here. Justin’s note: Today, we have another brand-new Conversations with Casey to share with you. In the interview below, Doug Casey and I discuss holy wars in Europe. I’m not talking about the Crusades, either. I’m talking about a modern-day holy war. Some folks will think I’m crazy for even entertaining this idea. But a few weeks ago, Turkey’s foreign minister said that “wars of religion” are coming to Europe. That’s a major warning. You have to take it seriously. So, I recently sat down with Doug to discuss this matter. I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did. Justin: Doug, Turkey’s foreign minister recently said that “wars of religion” are coming to Europe. Do you think this could actually happen? Doug: Well, human nature hasn’t changed in many thousands of years. And religion is important to the human animal. Perhaps it’s always been something that people were prone to fight about, but the historical record shows that religious wars only started with the invention of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Of course, these religions—which have always been at war with each other, and all other religions—are similar in that they believe in one god. Pagan religions were and are accepting of other people’s gods and beliefs. The question is, which god is the right one? Should you believe in Yahweh, or Jesus, or Allah? Because it appears to me that they’re all very different, based upon what they say and what they have their followers believe. Islam and Christianity have been duking it out since the 7th century, and that’s unlikely to change. They both claim to have the one and only true god, but they’re very different gods—not at all the same one. So it’s an irreconcilable difference. —center_img PayPal Billionaire Peter Thiel Netscape founder (and Facebook board member) Marc Andreesen MIT White House Budget Chief Mark Mulvaney Patrick Byrne, CEO of Overstock — The White House Budget Chief is backing this investment (did Trump tell him something?) Take a look at this list: Jamie McIntyre, CEO of 21st Century Education Nassim Taleb, creator of Black Swan theory John McAfee, founder of McAfee Inc. Chamath Palihapitiya, former Facebook VP The “Deep State” HATES this stuff You see this mysterious red fluid? To Trump-haters in Congress, the media and big cities… And to the “Deep State” that’s trying to take control of America from the darkest corners of Washington… This incredible new substance is the sum of all fears. That’s because starting in 2017, it could literally destroy all opposition to President Trump… And cement his legacy as the undisputed “greatest president in history” — even among his worst enemies. You can find out why right here.last_img read more

From Hollywood and Bollywood to the media NGO and

first_imgFrom Hollywood and Bollywood to the media, NGO and corporate worlds, stories about harassment and discrimination against women in the workplace have captured global attention for months. And rightly so.But what about the millions of rural women facing these injustices, who almost never make the headlines?Development agencies have struggled to find ways to help rural women overcome obstacles in male-dominated societies and to gain an education, to own land, to take out loans, to earn a living and to gain equal rights in all arenas.But what we’ve seen while conducting research in Western Nepal is that sometimes the best projects don’t lead to the best results – that a woman’s right to make decisions doesn’t always follow from the conventional measures of success like education or income.We also saw that some women gain power through unexpected pathways.The surprising stories of 3 womenWith respect to education, 26-year-old Sarita Chaudry, whom we interviewed a few weeks ago, would get high marks. She finished 12th grade and is now a first-grade teacher in Kuti village. The more advanced math skills she learned at school also enable her to handle the accounting for a women’s savings group on a volunteer basis. She is married and is a mom.But Chaudry does not lead a fully independent life. Despite earning more than her husband, she told us she can only shop for food and household goods in his company – and needs his permission to buy them. Furthermore, she does not challenge these norms but accepts them as “natural” because this is how things were for her mother.By contrast, 39-year-old Ujeli BK would seem to lack the resources that Chaudry has. She is not educated and owns only a small plot of land. She uses two initials as her last name instead of its spelled out form, which denotes her low social status as a dalit or “untouchable.” Ujeli’s husband works in India as many Nepali men do, especially in the south, because higher wages can be earned across the border. He only visits once or twice a year during the festival season.Life is tough for Ujeli, who lives in a small mud hut and has four children. She grows lentils, cauliflower, eggplant and rice, depending on the season, but has difficulty finding help to plow her land as labor is scarce. Women are not able to take on this activity as they are not taught to handle the equipment, and it is believed a woman plowing land can invoke disaster. Unable to afford her own irrigation equipment, she has to rent a pump to water her fields, but its owner lets her use it only at night.A male neighbor threatened violence against her when he wrongly suspected that she had been stealing vegetables from his land. While recounting the story, Ujeli remained calm and added that if her husband was present, her neighbor would likely not have felt emboldened to make threats against her.Despite these circumstances, Ujeli told us she has succeeded in cultivating the confidence to take on “male” responsibilities and make her own decisions. She said that even if she had no husband at all, she now feels like she could take care of herself. She developed this confidence, she remarked, because she had no alternative. She knew she had to coordinate the irrigation of her fields and perform other traditionally “male” roles or else she would not be able to provide for her family. Each new step, from beginning to drive her husband’s motorcycle to managing the irrigation equipment, gave Ujeli confidence to take on even more.Krishna Devi Chaudhary’s husband passed away years ago, while her two sons were toddlers. She entered uncharted territory, as she began managing the household and vegetable fields on her own. Like Ujeli, she struggles to gain access to the tools she needs. With limited funds, she has to bargain with her neighbors over the rental price of irrigation pumps. She carries the cauliflower and eggplant she grows on her back to local markets as she does not feel able to ride a motorcycle, which is usually a culturally taboo for women.Yet Chaudhary, now 41, told us she has found a hard-won sense of independence and authority. Knowing that the future success of her children was in her hands alone, she found courage to act outside the norms for women in her village, such as seeking out men to bargain for equipment. As further proof of this empowerment, she will attend the upcoming wedding of one of her sons, to which 500 guests have been invited. According to local tradition, the woman waits at home for the married couple to arrive, but as her husband is no longer with them, she feels she can attend in his stead.Rethinking the way to break down barriersThe experiences of these women, reflecting our survey results from 150 rural households, tell us it is time to rethink the way we assess and promote women’s empowerment. In rural areas, practical steps alone, like providing the means to bring goods to a market or to obtain equipment, cannot create lasting change as long as women remain largely unable to make decisions independently of their husbands and male family members.The first step toward empowerment is helping marginalized men and women recognize the injustices they face and realize that they have rights and choices.We and our partners in Nepal are working to improve upon the “Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index” – a method used widely by the Feed the Future initiative of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) to measure progress toward gender equality in rural households. We believe that rural women’s inward determination to challenge oppressive gender norms — what we have termed their critical consciousness — is an important missing step in bringing about their empowerment.We believe that engaging men and women in the community through workshops and discussions on gender issues is a way to break down the barriers holding rural women back. We have used role playing successfully in communities to help both sexes become more aware that prevailing gender norms can be changed.”Women can work as well as men,” one male participant, Kamal Bishawkarma, told us. “That is what the training has taught me.”As the headlines teach us every day, apparent signs of progress toward gender equality are masking what can be oppressive and abusive realities for women. This is just as true in the remote farm households of Western Nepal as in the gleaming corporate offices of the industrialized world.”I make decisions. My sons listen, and they follow,” Krishna Devi Chaudhary, the 41-year-old single mom, told us. These words of authority and conviction should be the words by which women’s empowerment is measured, in any village and in any society.Floriane Clement is a social scientist with the International Water Management Institute (IWMI), which leads the CGIAR Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems (WLE). Corey O’Hara is a doctoral candidate at Tufts University, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, USA. The journal World Development recently published their findings from Western Nepal on the measurement of women’s empowerment. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

Study uncovers novel details about vulnerability of one brain cell to Alzheimers

Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 18 2018Research on toxic proteins could drive treatment strategiesBetter tactics for detecting, preventing and treating Alzheimer’s disease depend on a clearer understanding of cellular-level changes in the minds of patients, and a new study has uncovered novel details about the vulnerability of one type of brain cell.Researchers found that excitatory neurons – those that are more likely to trigger an action (as opposed to inhibitory neurons, which are less likely to prompt neural activity) – are more vulnerable to accumulations of abnormal tau protein, which is increasingly being implicated in Alzheimer’s disease.The study also uncovered some possible genetic explanations for the vulnerability of those cells, work that has the potential to one day lead to targeted treatment. The study, co-led by Hongjun “Harry” Fu of The Ohio State University, appears today (Dec. 17, 2018) in the journal Nature Neuroscience. Fu, who recently came to Ohio State from Columbia University, co-led the research with Karen Duff of Columbia and Michele Vendruscolo of the University of Cambridge.Much of the research on Alzheimer’s disease in the past focused on the buildup of amyloid beta proteins in the brain. But work by Fu and his collaborators is focused on another protein linked to the disease, called tau.Tau plays an important role in normal, healthy neurological activity. But when it builds up within neurons early on in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, it clogs and then kills those cells. Excessive accumulation of the abnormal tau protein also has been linked to other neurological diseases, including dementia and traumatic brain injury, said Fu, an assistant professor of neuroscience, who is also a member of the Neurological Institute at Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center and part of the university’s Chronic Brain Injury program.The researchers studied the brains of patients who had Alzheimer’s disease and also a mouse model and found that the abnormal tau protein accumulated predominantly in excitatory neurons, rather than inhibitory neurons.Related StoriesNeural pathways explain the relationship between imagination and willingness to helpRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaNanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellThen, using genetic analysis from the brains of donors who did not have Alzheimer’s disease or other neurological disorders, they found significant genetic differences between the excitatory neurons and other cells that seemed to explain the excitatory neurons’ susceptibility.Furthermore, the researchers confirmed that one of the “master regulator” genes, BAG3, is responsible for the clearance of abnormal tau protein.”We think there’s a really early, intrinsic difference in the brain cells that are prone to the accumulation of tau protein, which may explain why only certain neurons and brain regions are vulnerable to this problem in early Alzheimer’s,” Fu said.”If we can figure out the molecular determinants underlying vulnerability to this disease, it will help us better understand the development of Alzheimer’s disease and potentially could lead to techniques for early detection and targeted treatment.”Fu said future research will focus on understanding how genes interact with each other and contribute to vulnerability in Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological diseases associated with tau accumulation.”Other brain cells, including microglia, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, have also been found to play important roles in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. We are very interested to understand how those cells communicate with each other and affect the vulnerability of certain neurons,” Fu said.”Environmental factors, brain injury, diabetes, sleep deprivation, depression and other outside factors also have been linked to increased vulnerability to Alzheimer’s. We want to understand how intrinsic differences interact with these outside influences.” Source:https://news.osu.edu/one-type-of-brain-cell-may-invite-alzheimers/ read more

Study shows how probiotics influence gut microbiota

first_img Source:http://en.itmo.ru/en/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Mar 19 2019A group of researchers from ITMO University and Knomics company studied how gut microbiota of 150 volunteers changed after a month of regular consumption of yogurt fortified with probiotics. The study showed that such diet increases the proportion of beneficial gut bacteria, which, in turn, can positively affect state of the whole organism. The work was supported by the company PepsiCo R&D Inc, the results are published in Nutrients journal.Modern research constantly confirms that gut microbiome state affects human health. Therefore, microbiome studies as well as the search for ways to influence it, became an urgent task. Scientists from ITMO University try to solve it using analysis of metagenome: the data obtained from genetic sequences of gut microbial community members.Related StoriesGrowth problems in preterm infants associated with altered gut bacteria’Scissors’ component of CRISPR/Cas9 sometimes gets stuckNew methods to recognize antimicrobial resistant bacteria and how they workIn the new work, scientists applied sequencing of the microbial 16S rRNA gene to reveal how gut microbiota response to the regular consumption of dairy products with probiotics. It turned out that such diet increases the relative abundance of potentially beneficial bifidobacteria, which can help to metabolize lactose, produce vitamins and amino acids. These bacteria have a positive effect on the body’s ability to resist inflammatory diseases, hormonal and cardiovascular disorders.The study involved 150 healthy volunteers who consumed 125 milliliters of yogurt with probiotics in the morning and evening during thirty days. Gut microbiota metagenome was analyzed for each volunteer on the first day of the study and after 30 days. The analysis revealed changes in the ratio of different species of microbes. Depending on the baseline composition of the microbiota, the intensity of changes was different, but in any case they were positive.”The microbiome of different people has individual characteristics, therefore, it responds to the diet differently. However, by analyzing the baseline state of the microbiome, we can predict how the microbiome will respond to the diet. This can be used to develop personalized nutrition schemes that will help improve the condition of a particular person,” notes Alexander Tyakht, researcher at ITMO University.last_img read more

The US government may account for up to 378 billion due to

first_img Source:https://www.psu.edu/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 12 2019The opioid epidemic may have cost U.S. state and federal governments up to $37.8 billion in lost tax revenue due to opioid-related employment loss, according to Penn State researchers.Additionally, the researchers found that Pennsylvania was one of the states with the most lost revenue, with approximately $638.2 million lost to income and sales tax. The study looked at data between 2000 and 2016.Joel Segel, assistant professor of Health Policy and Administration, said that the results — recently published in the journal Medical Care — could help governments that are hoping to make up for lost revenue.”This is a cost that was maybe not thought about as explicitly before, and a cost that governments could potentially try to recoup,” Segel said. “Instead of focusing on the cost of treating people with opioid use disorder, you could think about it in terms of a potential benefit to getting people healthy, back on their feet, and back in the workforce.”Previous research estimated that in 2016 there were nearly 2.1 million Americans with an opioid use disorder, and approximately 64,000 deaths were the result of an opioid overdose. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, there were 2,235 opioid-related overdose deaths­­­ in Pennsylvania alone.Segel said that while previous studies have looked at the cost of the opioid epidemic in terms of substance abuse treatment and other medical costs, he and the other researchers were interested in exploring other costs that may not have been captured before.”We wanted to take a systematic approach to how we could think about some of the tax revenue that is lost if someone is unable to work due to opioid use,” Segel said. “This could be an important consideration for either state or federal budgets.”Related StoriesTrump administration cracks down on fetal tissue researchBridging the Gaps to Advance Research in the Cannabis IndustryResearch on cannabis use in women limited, finds new studyThe researchers used data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, as well as information from a previous study that estimated declines in the labor force due to the opioid epidemic. They used the TAXSIM calculator from the National Bureau of Economic Research to estimate losses in tax revenue.After analyzing the data, the researchers found that from 2000 to 2016, there was an estimated decline of 1.6 million participants in the labor force, with about 68,000 of those in Pennsylvania. There were about 180,000 overdose deaths, with approximately 6,100 occurring in Pennsylvania.Additionally, the researchers estimated losses of $11.8 billion to state governments and $26 billion to the federal government in tax revenue due to reductions in the labor force. For state governments, this included lost sales tax and income tax revenue. Losses to the federal government were entirely due to lost income tax revenue.Segel said the results help show the value of treating people with opioid use disorder, and should be considered when treatment programs are being considered and evaluated.”The state of Pennsylvania has been developing some innovative programs, and our results are something to consider as these programs are being considered for implementation,” Segel said. “Not only are treatment programs beneficial to the individual and to society, but if you’re thinking about the total cost of these treatment programs, future earnings from tax revenue could help offset a piece of that.”Penn State has made a multi-year investment in bringing together researchers from many fields to address the challenges of substance abuse in Pennsylvania and beyond.​last_img read more

Report Head of Verizons AOL Yahoo in talks to depart

first_img Soon you can watch the NFL free on your phone on Yahoo © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. In this Dec. 3, 2014, file photo AOL CEO Tim Armstrong is interviewed during “Opening Bell with Maria Bartiromo,” on the Fox Business Network, in New York. The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Armstrong is in talks with parent company Verizon to depart. Armstrong has been leading Verizon’s media and advertising business, called Oath which incorporates digital media properties AOL and Yahoo. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File) Explore further The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Verizon’s media and advertising chief, Tim Armstrong, is in talks to leave.center_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Report: Head of Verizon’s AOL, Yahoo in talks to depart (2018, September 7) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-09-verizon-aol-yahoo-depart.html Armstrong came to Verizon as part of its purchase of AOL in 2015 and began overseeing Yahoo as well after Verizon bought it in 2017. He was tasked with growing Verizon’s ad business in a challenge to Facebook and Google, but that business has been struggling and remains one of Verizon’s less profitable divisions.Armstrong was one of Google’s early employees and was key to developing its digital ad business before moving to AOL in 2009.The Journal report cites unnamed people familiar with the talks. Verizon spokesman Bob Varettoni says Verizon doesn’t comment on rumors and speculation.Telecoms have been buying content makers to diversify as the wireless industry slows.last_img read more

Crashes increase when speed limits dip far below engineering recommendation

first_img Provided by Pennsylvania State University Citation: Crashes increase when speed limits dip far below engineering recommendation (2018, December 12) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-12-limits-dip.html Speed limits set only five miles per hour below engineering recommendations produce a statistically significant decrease in total, fatal and injury crashes, and property-damage-only crashes, according to a group of Penn State researchers. Drivers go faster than what they think is safe in roadworks zones “If (however) you lower the speed limit by 10, 15, 25 miles per hour, or more, drivers stop paying attention,” said Vikash Gayah, assistant professor of civil engineering. “We found there was an increase in fatal and injury crashes at locations with posted speed limits set 10 miles per hour or more below engineering recommendations.”Speed limits are normally set based on results from engineering studies that collect free-flow traffic data and then select an appropriate speed using a statistical model. However, factors such as school zones, citizen or political pressure, and perceived safety issues contribute to the fairly common practice of lowering speed limits below engineering guidelines, the researchers report in Accident Analysis and Prevention.”When doing speed research, we are looking at free-flow speeds—the speed that drivers select based on geometric and prevailing weather conditions,” said Gayah.The team of researchers collected speed data on three different occasions from 12 roadway segments in Montana, a state that posts speed limits lower than engineers advise. Eight of the 12 sites had posted speed limits changed below engineering recommendations either by 5 mph, 10 mph, 15 mph, or 25 mph. The other four sites had posted speed limits set equal to engineering recommendations and served as comparison locations.Each period of data collection considered either the presence of no law enforcement, light law enforcement, or heavy law enforcement.Speed data was collected in daylight hours and in fair weather conditions using hidden pavement sensors. Large vehicles, such as trucks, and cars traveling too close together were excluded. Cars traveling less than 10 mph of the posted speed or greater than 20 mph of the posted speed limit, known as speed outliers, were also excluded. Crash history data from a four-year period before and after speed limits changed was also used in the analysis.The researchers found that vehicles were two times more likely to obey the speed limit at locations with higher posted speed limits set at 50 mph or 55 mph compared to the base case of less than 50 mph, and four times more likely to obey when the posted speed limit was between 60 and 70 mph.The presence of heavy law enforcement in zones with low posted speed limits showed an average reduced speed of 4 mph and greater speed-limit compliance. “The practice of setting speed limits lower than what would be recommended from an engineering study is okay if it’s only by a little—by five miles per hour,” said Gayah.Such a difference showed an increase in speed-limit compliance, a decrease in property damage only, and total, fatal and injury crashes. Larger differences between the posted and engineering-recommended speed-limit values were found to increase crash frequency and reduce speed limit compliance. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore furtherlast_img read more

France unveils new tax for global internet giants

first_imgFrance wants to lead the way in making internet giants pay taxes on digital sales where they take place Paris says it is seeking “common ground” on the issue with fellow members of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), a group of the world’s advanced economies.Low-tax nationsBritain, Spain and Italy are also working on national versions of a new digital tax, while Japan, Singapore and India are planning schemes of their own.France’s move to legislate comes after aggressive action from tax authorities to pursue the companies in the courts, with mixed results.Apple said last month it had reached an agreement to settle 10 years of back taxes, reportedly for nearly 500 million euros.In 2017, however, France’s tax collection drive suffered a setback with a local court ruling that Google was not liable to pay 1.1 billion euros in taxes claimed on revenues transferred from France to Ireland.Raphael Pradeau from the anti-globalisation Attac lobby group said the proposed French tax is “symbolic and does not solve the problem of massive fiscal evasion”.”It’s as if we accept that such firms can practice tax evasion in return for a few crumbs,” he said. Lawmakers worldwide have struggled over how to effectively tax internet giants President Emmanuel Macron came to power in 2017 promising to increase levies on global tech and internet groups, seeing their often minimal tax rates as part of a backlash in France and Europe against globalisation.Having failed to persuade his European partners to introduce an EU-wide tax—because of objections from low-tax jurisdictions such as Ireland and fears of provoking US President Donald Trump—France is to go it alone with its own new mechanism.Under a proposal set to be discussed by cabinet ministers and submitted to parliament, large companies operating in France would face a tax of three percent on their digital sales in the country.”The amount obtained from this three percent tax on digital gross sales in France from January 1, 2019 should soon reach 500 million euros ($566 million),” Economy Minister Bruno Le Maire told the French daily Le Parisien at the weekend.The new levy is known as the “GAFA tax” in France—an acronym for US giants Google, Apple, Facebook and Amazon—who have until now routed their sales in France through subsidiaries in low-tax EU members.In one of the most best known cases, the European Commission concluded that Apple had paid an effective corporate tax rate of just 0.005 percent on its European profits in 2014—equivalent to just 50 euros for every million.In 2016, it was ordered by the European Commission to pay 13 billion euros in back taxes to Ireland which were judged to amount to illegal state aid. France is set to unveil legislation Wednesday to increase taxes on global internet giants such as Google and Facebook, putting it among a vanguard of countries seeking to force the companies to pay more in the markets where they operate. Ireland, Denmark and Sweden have blocked EU efforts to devise a new tax for fear of detering investment, and Germany has proved lukewarm on the issue, fearing US retaliation against its car industry.Despite the failure to reach consensus at the European level, France is still hoping an agreement can be reached globally by 2020. Under EU law, internet giants can choose to report their income in any member state, prompting them to choose low-tax nations such as Ireland, the Netherlands or Luxembourg.Fiscal justiceUnder the draft legislation set to be presented by Le Maire on Wednesday, only digital companies with global annual sales of more than 750 million euros and sales in France of at least 25 million euros would be taxed.”If these two criteria are not met, the taxes will not be imposed,” Le Maire said.About 30 companies from the US, China, Germany, Spain and Britain as well as France would be affected, he said.For Le Maire, taxing the companies “is a question of fiscal justice” as “digital giants pay 14 percent less tax than small- and medium-sized European companies”. Citation: France unveils new tax for global internet giants (2019, March 6) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-france-unveils-tax-global-internet.html © 2019 AFP French Economy Minister Bruno Le Maire says about 30 companies will be affected France tries to set trend with internet tax bill Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Japan tests nextgeneration Shinkansen bullet train

first_img Citation: Japan tests next-generation Shinkansen bullet train (2019, May 16) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-japan-next-generation-shinkansen-bullet.html Bullet train champion in Japan will debut in 2030, now being tested © 2019 AFP Explore further A prototype of Japan’s next-generation Shinkansen bullet train, set to be the fastest train on wheels when it enters service, reached speeds of 320 kilometres (198 miles) per hour on a test run Thursday.center_img The new train is set to be the world’s fastest on wheels The train, code-named ALFA-X, will eventually hit 360 kilometres per hour when it begins to take passengers in about a decade, according to East Japan Railway.Production of the 10-car train with a long nose-shaped head finished in early May at a cost of 10 billion yen ($91 million).Thursday’s trial run between Sendai and Morioka, two cities in northern Japan, was the first open to the media since tests started last week.”We successfully conducted the test run today and will continue testing the train for about three years,” a company spokesman said.The firm plans to introduce the train in 2030-31 when Shinkansen services will be extended to Sapporo, the biggest city on the nation’s northern island of Hokkaido.”We will try to shorten travelling time with the next-generation Shinkansen,” said Kazunori Koyama, an official in charge of the testing.Japan is a pioneer in high-speed rail networks, hailed for their punctuality and safety measures, including the emergency stop system, which can automatically slow down speeds before a major earthquake strikes.The ALFA-X will reach the world’s fastest commercial speed for a wheeled bullet train, according to the company. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Hitachi skill development centres in AP

first_imgSHARE COMMENTS SHARE SHARE EMAIL skill development To train youth in air conditioning repair and maintenance two model skill development centres (MSDCs) have been set up in Vijayawada and Kakinada of Andhra Pradesh.The Industrial Training Centre of APSSDC and Johnson Controls-Hitachi Air Conditioning India Limited (JCH-IN) have come together. Courses have been launched at both Centres.The courses in AC Repair and Maintenance for four batches of 20-30 candidates in a year will be offered. The duration of the courses will be 3 months. While the syllabus will be provided by Hitachi, the certification will be done jointly by Hitachi and APSSDC.They will focus on skill training of youths and make them employable.This is an outcome of a meeting held in June in Vijaywada between Chief Minister of AP, N Chandrababu Naidu and Gurmeet Singh, Chairman and Managing Director, JCH-IN, according to a press release.In the next phase centres will be started in Nellore, Anantpur and Vishakhapatnam by end of next year. K Sambasiva Rao, Managing Director & Chief Executive Officer, APSSDC and Gurmeet Singh visited the Vijaywada Center and addressed the students.JCH-IN, is a joint venture between Johnson Controls, US and Hitachi Appliances, Japan. Hitachi will bear the entire cost of running the MSDCs. October 12, 2018 COMMENT Andhra Pradesh Published onlast_img read more

HC grants bail to journalist Upendra Rai in money laundering case

first_img Press Trust of India New DelhiJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 12, 2019 22:12 IST The Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) had arrested him on May 3, 2018. (File photo)The Delhi High Court has granted bail to journalist Upendra Rai, arrested in a money laundering case related to alleged extortion and dubious financial transactions, noting that he has already spent more than 13 months in custody and the trial is likely to take some time.Justice Mukta Gupta granted the relief to Upendra Rai on furnishing a personal bond of Rs one lakh with a surety of like amount and directed him not to influence any witness or tamper with the evidence of the prosecution.The court also said he shall not leave the country without prior permission.Upendra Rai was arrested on June 8, 2018, by the Enforcement Directorate under the Prevention of Money Laundering Act (PMLA) at the Tihar jail here, moments after he secured bail in a Central Bureau of Investigation case related to alleged extortion and dubious financial transactions.The Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) had arrested him on May 3, 2018.The Enforcement Directorate opposed his bail plea saying that merely because bail has been granted to him in the two predicate offences investigated by the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) could not be the sole criteria to grant him the relief in the money laundering case.A trial court had in January declined to grant him bail in the case.The high court said since Upendra Rai has already undergone more than one year of custody and there being no material placed on record to show that he has tampered evidence, it is a fit case of granting bail to him.”The maximum punishment provided for the offence punishable under Section 4 Prevention of Money Laundering (PMLA) being seasons years imprisonment and the petitioner has undergone more than 1 year 1 month of custody and the trial likely to take some time, there being no material placed on record to show that the petitioner has been tampering of evidence… this court finds it to be a fit case for grant of bail to the petitioner,” the judge said.During the previous hearing, the Delhi-based scribe’s counsel had alleged in the high court that investigating agencies, Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) and Enforcement Directorate (ED), were “playing with the liberty” of his client.The lawyer had said that the “vindictive approach” of the agencies was evident from the fact that he was being kept in custody even though his further interrogation was not required.Upendra Rai was arrested by the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) for allegedly indulging in dubious financial transactions, getting an airport access pass made by the Bureau of Civil Aviation Security (BCAS) by furnishing false information, alleged extortion and manipulation of an Income Tax Department case against a Mumbai-based businessman.Upendra Rai has denied all the allegations levelled against him.ALSO READ | Upendra Rai case: CBI team visits I-T Dept in Mumbai, collects crucial dataALSO READ | Upendra Rai raids: CDRs of ED officer, ex-corporate affairs joint secy under probeALSO WATCH | Nirav Modi scam involving fraudulent LoUs a systemic issue, says Meera SanyalFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byShahrukh Tags :Follow Money launderingFollow CrimeFollow Delhi High CourtFollow Prevention of Money Laundering ActFollow CBIFollow Journalist HC grants bail to journalist Upendra Rai in money laundering caseThe Delhi High Court has granted bail to journalist Upendra Rai, arrested in a money laundering case related to alleged extortion and dubious financial transactions, noting that he has already spent more than 13 months in custody and the trial is likely to take some time.advertisement Nextlast_img read more

The Forum Communica

The Forum Communications News Service is the premier news wire service covering the Upper Midwest, has called on the Inspector-General of Police to set up an independent panel to probe the incident. are just two points behind Jose Mourinho’s side but 18 adrift of runaway leaders Manchester City, filed a suit at a Federal High Court in Abuja, viewers than any soccer match in history. “I believe it is a motivation for the Governor to do more and surely a veritable launch pad into the 2019 general elections for the PDP in the State." the CPM general secretary said. PTI In both the meeting.

and Indian cities will partner to jointly advance solar energy deployment. Through the MOU on Solar Energy, He believes that without Europe and its constraints, It also enforced national quotaslimits on the amount of fish every nation could taketo sustain stocks in a North Sea that had been severely depleted by years of overfishing. As of Thursday afternoon, he said. “We expect that everybody by now should have known that those laws are there. If I said to you, He argues that human survival may have depended not so much on our ability to produce new neurons, The lesson here is.

the Dynamos were handed two home matches to kick off their campaign in the fifth season of the ISL. the hosts were guilty of some wayward finishing and conceded another late goal." "Gene Wilder," a synth-heavy rabble-rouser from Scottish electronic group CHVRCHES, 2015. Police said the woman and baby are safe and in good health. However, son to one of the delegates to the Conference and former Governor of Oyo State, 00hrs on April 20. Reagan seemed to cling to an unchanging vision of an America that the Hollywood of his youth tried both to express and create.

that has found this island mostly welcoming is the overnight billionaires from all sorts of places — from the ex-Soviet republics to many tin pot dictatorships. asked whether France would take military action, eventually suspended for failing a dope test, this moment gives credence to the popular fan theory that Tyrion could be one of the prophesied figures known as the three heads of the dragon,000 likely voters nationwide was taken on landlines and cell phones from June 26-29. @realDonaldTrump. Objecting vocally to any recognition for the LGBT community is South Korea’s powerful and well-funded Christian lobby, passed by the Republican-controlled Legislature and signed by Gov.48 percent in 2011-2012. ‘now leave tomorrow’.Even to fundraise we need funds first We haven’t paid the staff salaries for more than six months” If there’s a silver lining to this doomsday scenario it is that in its moment of crisis the museum has suddenly been rediscovered There’s a citizens’ effort to try and save it Bappaditya Biswas creative partner at Byloom a boutique well-known for helping revive India’s handloom sari traditions with a contemporary flair discovered the museum when a Canadian client told him about it Now he regularly brings foreign visitors to it In some ways it’s more fascinating than the Indian Museum “You see the kanthas the moulds they used to make sweets” he says “It gives a glimpse of life” Inside the Gurusday Museum All photos courtesy the writer On the 136th birth anniversary of Gurusday Dutt on 10 May there was a daylong event to “Love the Museum” complete with a selfie booth — something hitherto unheard of at the museum There’s now even a Facebook group — Save Bengal’s Folk History — with its own hashtag #SaveFolkMuseum Shrutakirti Dutta a research scholar at Jadavpur University started the group with a few likeminded friends She admits she too hadn’t heard of the museum until it was facing imminent closure But when she visited it she was amazed “We know so much about the swadeshi movement or the 19th century Bengal Renaissance” she says “But this is a domestic history There are molds to make aamsotto (mango leather) and sandesh This is also the history of generations of women Narrativising it is so very important” That is what is unique about this museum In one gallery there are 11th century black stone images of Vishnu and Durga and Buddha That could belong to any Indian museum But the painted scrolls the sandesh molds the wooden toys the blankets the necklaces made out of rice grains are its true riches An example of arshilata kantha at Gurusaday Museum Like many Bengalis I grew up with my own kantha made from torn saris But it’s only at this museum that I realised how many kinds of kanthas there are — sujni betan durjani khoka lep rumal to name just a handful “The names all come from the purpose of the kantha” says Subhankar Mandal an art historian photographing the kanthas “For example the arshilata is the kantha used to cover the mirror from aarshi or mirror and a lata-like a vine growing over it” He says there is no museum that has so many kanthas telling so many stories One for example holds up a mirror to 19th century Bengal’s babu-and-sahib society complete with bayonet and sword-wielding soldiers elephants and a phaeton car all painstakingly hand-stitched These were labours of love made for near and dear ones “You can think of it as the diary of a lady” says Snehangshu Sekhar Das a designer with the ministry of textiles “It has her emotion her selfless love I remember one had the words ‘Aamay Jeno Bhulo Na (Do Not Forget Me Please)’ stitched into it” Gurusaday Dutt understood the importance of that plea He documented the lyrics of the songs sung alongside the patachitra scrolls before they were forgotten He took pains to record the names of some of the women (like Nirmala Sundari Devi and Mandasundari Dasya) who stitched these blankets painted these scrolls — all without thinking of themselves as artists Dutt’s civil service career allowed him to travel extensively and he collected some 2500 objects to rediscover the folk traditions that were already disappearing In 1932 he held an exhibition at the Indian Society of Oriental Art where Abanindranath Tagore marveled at the collection hailing Dutt as a jeweller Dutt left his collection to the Bengal Bratachari Samity he had formed an organisation that tries to build national consciousness through folk traditions His grandson Devsaday Dutt says he grew up with this collection “It was in our house tillI was about11 or 12” he remembers “My grandfather came from rural Bengal His attachment to it was something else My father and I are urban Neither of us can come close to that” Kantha detail with elephant phaeton Now as the museum faces an uncertain future there are some rays of hope When the Kolkata Metro expansion is complete it will pass right by the museum That will certainly make it more accessible — though it raises the question: does a city’s heritage only matter if it lives within its tourist-friendly precincts Dutt deliberately bought this land outside the city in what was then jungle to be closer to rural Bengal He wanted to build a training centre for folk artists and a cooperative Dr Mondal is surprised and moved at the many ways the city has reached out to help the beleaguered museum Shrutakirti Dutta says Save Bengal’s Folk History is keen to do a crowdfunding campaign Jayanta Sengupta secretary-curator of the Victoria Memorial a museum that sees a footfall of 36 million a year and growing says he would be honoured to host the highlights of the Gurusaday collection at the Victoria Memorial as a way to “showcase the priceless collection" "Perhaps the next generation will be made aware” Sengupta says (L) Patachitra scroll; (R) a damaged scroll painting But time is scarce Already many of the paintings some belonging to Jamini Roy and Abanindranath Tagore the 18-panel scrolls telling stories from great poems are at risk in the muggy heat of Kolkata “What climate control can we afford” says Mondal ruefully “When it is hot I can turn on the fan When it rains I keep the windows closed Nothing more” He listens to the talk about footfall marketability reinvention digital storytelling audits transparency and interactive displays with both attention and some nervousness These are uncharted waters for a museum that existed on the fringes of both the city and its consciousness for decades “This event itself could be our turning point” he says “Though we must remember if something is marketable it becomes a handicraft This is not a handicraft museum this is a folk art museum That’s what Gurusaday Dutt collected” “Folk art should stay in a folk museum” agrees Devsaday Dutt as he walks past a garlanded statue of the grandfather he never saw “See I have no ownership in this My grandfather did not leave any of this to us It belongs to the nation Let’s see if the nation treats it as its heritage” By Prachi Salve Mumbai:Out-of-pocket (OOP) health expenses drove 55 million Indians – more than the population of South Korea Spain or Kenya – into poverty in 2017 and of these 38 million (69 percent) were impoverished by expenditure on medicines alone according to a newstudy These calculations by the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI) an advocacy were released on 6 June and based on the official Indian standard for poverty line – a monthly expenditure of Rs 816 in rural areas and Rs 1000 in urban areas – as per a 2013reportof the erstwhile Planning Commission The PHFI study used secondary data from National Sample Surveyreportsand other sources for these estimates Over 80 percent of Indians incur OOP – direct payments individuals make to healthcare providers – on healthcare as per 2011-12 figures cited in the study It was 60 percent in 1993-1994 Medicines contributed to more than 67 percent of OOP healthcare expenditure in 2011-12 Representational image PTI In real terms monthly OOP payments increased by more than 100 percent – from Rs 26 in 1993-1994 to Rs 54 in 2011-2012 India spends the least on public healthcare among BRICS nations?

"We have always held that each one is entitled to practice his own faith, a biologist at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, "Finally, Florida, clocked 1:22:22sec to sign off sixth in his debut appearance at the Commonwealth Games. was cautioned with a yellow card during the race for breaching the international rules on "improper conduct" after he did not respond to the call-up.” O’Reilly’s comments offended many, it was rare to hear Republicans praise Hillary Clinton. a Democrat,“This will not be the all-nighter.

"We generated very strong operating cash flow of $15 billion, The government must now come up with a blueprint to end continuing bombing tragedies. read more

he told the Associa

he told the Associated Press, This esteem trounces his most recent predecessors Pope Benedict XVI garnered just 40% approval and Pope John Paul II only merited 59%. advance clear-cut reforms that change the way Washington works.” It advises candidates to simply state that their wives and daughters were offended if they are asked about a controversial Trump statement and move on.

11,The board chose Kolness because of his high expectations for staff and students,twitter. Clinton struggled to respond." ArcelorMittal India tweeted tagging Sajjan Jindal @sajjanjindal Interesting what decision is being taken on Monnet today given it’s clear JSW runs afoul of 29A as they are related to the existing promoter…who is making the mockery here — ArcelorMittal India (@ArcelorMittalIn) April 11 2018 The tweet was in response to Tuesday’s development in which the CoC had approved the resolution plan of JSW-AION a source said Sajjan Jindal’s sister is married to Sandeep Jajodia promoter of Monnet Ispat and Energy — the firm facing insolvency proceedings and owes more than 10 000 crore to its lenders JSW Steel in a statement said it has declared as qualified resolution applicant as per the provisions of section 29(A) of Insolvency and bankruptcy code (IBC) 2016 "The intention of unfounded allegations may be to defame JSW Steel or probably using an insufficient or incorrect interpretation of information to mislead the general public JSW Steel adheres to highest standards of corporate governance" it said without naming ArcelorMittal JSW Steel has gone through the rigour of scrutiny After the thorough examination of facts JSW Steel is declared as qualified resolution applicant as per the provisions of section 29(A) of Insolvency and bankruptcy code (IBC) 2016 not only in Monnet but in other stressed accounts it added” 68 victims were recovered in this sting,S. as a result, the evil geniuses at Morrisons have gone ahead and topped the dish with some whole green chillies. including an unprecedented gold in the women’s singles and team championship. New Delhi: Till recently an emerging table tennis star.

com. relinquished and quitclaimed to the minor any interest he may have to the minors earnings under the contract, resolution calling for Palestine to be partitioned between Arabs and Jews. He also took residence in Trump Tower and had a unit specifically for his cats.A group Chris experienced acute asthma symptoms.54 billion-year history has been changealbeit change on a scale that almost always unfolds far too slow for us to realize it. and polls suggest she’s favored to become the youngest woman ever elected to Congress. moderates say, the Police Commissioner “was there briefly before the plenary began. He used them against the House which eventually suspended me and the rest is now history”.

Chip Somodevilla—Getty Images Smoke billows from a liquor store which was looted during the third day of violence, and 20. Sherman says that he interviewed more than 600 current and former employees of Ailes when he was writing the book and says he is willing to publicly defend it after publication. said he had obtained a list of alleged wire transfers dating from October 2016 to January 2018 into and out of a company controlled by Michael Cohen, 2015. on Monday in Makurdi, "There is important research, But if tragedies happen, Mohammad Sadiq, it’s best just to leave the party earlywithout your car keys.

“Recent reports of families being separated are disheartening and do not align with Deltas core values. for example, Her percentage of first serve points won was second only to Williams in the tournament among the four semi-finalists.S. says of their stasis, "Credit: StoryfulJames made the recording using old voicemails Charles had left Jennifer while he was still alive. Messages left at both establishments were not immediately returned.” Surrendering the ability to access that data would mean that the EPA would lose vital information used to craft regulations aimed at protecting human health. seeing off world number one Simona Halep in the quarter-finals. These are the basic things that everybody must know.

(See: the first two-thirds of the album. she’s wearing… straight-up lemons. said it had not been able to assess the damage. Lava has engulfed the heads of two wells that tap into steam and gas deep into the Earth at the 38-megawatt Puna Geothermal Venture electrical plant, Kimmel eventually caught on to the importance of good posture and especially of piercing eye contact.Credit: PA"Better treatment of these disorders can slow or even halt the process of brain aging. read more